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Old October 24th, 2011, 08:03 AM   #11
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I think maybe I will let Gary speak for himself. Something tells me that he would not necessarily agree with your appraisal of his opinions, at least not 100%.



You speak of 'common secular law.' What do you mean by that?
"Common secular law" is what we in the US call our constitution and laws, which apply to everyone under US jurisdiction. That's in contrast to things like the Mormon prohibition on caffeine and alcohol, the Jewish & Muslim ban on the consumption of pork, or Gary's religious view of homosexuality......which he wants enforced through our common secular law.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 08:18 AM   #12
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Where does 'common secular law' derive its authority? Why do you say 'secular?' I understand what you offer in contrast, but contrast does not define, only demonstrates difference.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 08:59 AM   #13
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Where does 'common secular law' derive its authority? Why do you say 'secular?' I understand what you offer in contrast, but contrast does not define, only demonstrates difference.
I'm not sure what you're getting at. US law is secular, and any laws which lack a secular primary purpose are unconstitutional.



The laws of your bizarre cult should control your life, not mine.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 09:48 AM   #14
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Just asking, Mr. Shrekk. I like to know with whom I am dealing and under what definitions they operate.



Now the establishment clause only prevents the United States Congress from enacting laws establishing a nationwide religion. That clause does not prevent the states from enacting laws concerning, alcohol, gay rights, gay marriage, etc. as you seem to say. I do not see a connection.



And the establishment clause also does not prevent states, if the so decide, to establish religions within their boundaries. In fact, all 13 original states maintained laws which established religious requirements on office holders well into the period that began with the ratification of the Constitution. The last of those laws was in effect almost eighty years after the Constitution was ratified, until 1877, in New Hampshire. If you would like a reference for that, please see http://undergod.proc...p?resourceID=69 . The states originated their respective establishment clauses on their own authority. And they obviously did not cede to the federal government oversight authority to be used to regulate religious requirements within their borders under the Constitution. Those establishment statutes existed for decades into the Constitution period. And the states rescinded the laws in question under their own authority, not on any authority from imposed by the federal government. So I'm not sure by what authority you claim, 'any laws which have primarily a religious purpose are unconstitutional.' Would you please cite for me the documentary evidence that supports that each of the states comprising the United States of America handed to our federal government the authority to regulate the enactment of laws respecting religion within their respective boundaries? Because unless you can, then I am trying to understand how you can possibly be correct.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 10:29 AM   #15
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Now the establishment clause only prevents the United States Congress from enacting laws establishing a nationwide religion. That clause does not prevent the states from enacting laws concerning, alcohol, gay rights, gay marriage, etc. as you seem to say. I do not see a connection.



And the establishment clause also does not prevent states, if the so decide, to establish religions within their boundaries. In fact, all 13 original states maintained laws which established religious requirements on office holders well into the period that began with the ratification of the Constitution. The last of those laws was in effect almost eighty years after the Constitution was ratified, until 1877, in New Hampshire. If you would like a reference for that, please see http://undergod.proc...p?resourceID=69 . The states originated their respective establishment clauses on their own authority. And they obviously did not cede to the federal government oversight authority to be used to regulate religious requirements within their borders under the Constitution. Those establishment statutes existed for decades into the Constitution period. And the states rescinded the laws in question under their own authority, not on any authority from imposed by the federal government. So I'm not sure by what authority you claim, 'any laws which have primarily a religious purpose are unconstitutional.' Would you please cite for me the documentary evidence that supports that each of the states comprising the United States of America handed to our federal government the authority to regulate the enactment of laws respecting religion within their respective boundaries? Because unless you can, then I am trying to understand how you can possibly be correct.
I linked above to the Lemon Test, but you might want to learn about the Incorporation Doctrine, as well as the 1947 Everson v Board of Ed case. While you're right that initially the states could continue to remain theocracies, that hasn't technically been true since the civil war. The 14th Amendment extends the Bill of Rights to the states and the Everson ruling was an inevitable consequence of that - a variety of SCOTUS rulings since that time has cemented the fact that the establishment clause in the federal constitution applies to the states, not just Congress.



As I said, the sharia laws of your bizarre cult are your business - not mine, and not the government's.

I'm not surprised that members of the American Taliban and other Christofascists don't like that.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 02:45 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Radicalcentrist' timestamp='1319478531' post='363647

Now the establishment clause only prevents the United States Congress from enacting laws establishing a nationwide religion. That clause does not prevent the states from enacting laws concerning, alcohol, gay rights, gay marriage, etc. as you seem to say. I do not see a connection.



And the establishment clause also does not prevent states, if the so decide, to establish religions within their boundaries. In fact, all 13 original states maintained laws which established religious requirements on office holders well into the period that began with the ratification of the Constitution. The last of those laws was in effect almost eighty years after the Constitution was ratified, until 1877, in New Hampshire. If you would like a reference for that, please see http://undergod.proc...p?resourceID=69 . The states originated their respective establishment clauses on their own authority. And they obviously did not cede to the federal government oversight authority to be used to regulate religious requirements within their borders under the Constitution. Those establishment statutes existed for decades into the Constitution period. And the states rescinded the laws in question under their own authority, not on any authority from imposed by the federal government. So I'm not sure by what authority you claim, 'any laws which have primarily a religious purpose are unconstitutional.' Would you please cite for me the documentary evidence that supports that each of the states comprising the United States of America handed to our federal government the authority to regulate the enactment of laws respecting religion within their respective boundaries? Because unless you can, then I am trying to understand how you can possibly be correct.
I linked above to the Lemon Test, but you might want to learn about the Incorporation Doctrine, as well as the 1947 Everson v Board of Ed case. While you're right that initially the states could continue to remain theocracies, that hasn't technically been true since the civil war. The 14th Amendment extends the Bill of Rights to the states and the Everson ruling was an inevitable consequence of that - a variety of SCOTUS rulings since that time has cemented the fact that the establishment clause in the federal constitution applies to the states, not just Congress.



As I said, the sharia laws of your bizarre cult are your business - not mine, and not the government's.

I'm not surprised that members of the American Taliban and other Christofascists don't like that.


You make a reasonable point, and that is that at any particular time, the federal judiciary or the Supreme Court can make the Constitution mean anything that it wants it to mean. And we are bound to live with that. And that is how various private and public agendas become law. And the 14th Amendment is vague enough as to allow the Supreme Court promulgate a doctrine of Separate but Equal for almost 60 years, but then turn on a dime and claim that that doctrine was incorrect. So if we are going to argue various court decisions, rather than the facts as they exist, then we can demonstrate anything we might like to demonstrate.



But I asked you when the states authorized the federal government to regulate the enactment of laws respecting religion within their respective boundaries. I asked for a fact. Your answer is an opinion of the meaning of the 14th Amendment. OK, fine. That is as good of an answer as I can expect.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 04:04 PM   #17
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But I asked you when the states authorized the federal government to regulate the enactment of laws respecting religion within their respective boundaries. I asked for a fact. Your answer is an opinion of the meaning of the 14th Amendment. OK, fine. That is as good of an answer as I can expect.
They did that through the supremacy clause and the 14th Amendment, specifically the following section of the 14th Amendment:

Quote:
No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States;
As SCOTUS has gradually changed its interpretation of the scope of those "privileges or immunities" to incorporate most of the bill of rights (the Incorporation Doctrine), the states have necessarily been obligated to respect those rights.



Otherwise a state could criminalize Judaism or deny you your right to free speech.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 04:15 AM   #18
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Shrekk,



I do not argue for or against opinions of various court cases. The history of the republic demonstrates that the courts are every bit political institutions as they are institutions of justice. I expect that you may even agree with me on that, to a certain extent. I argue the intent of the state legislatures who ratified the 14th Amendment in1868. When they ratified the 14th Amendment, the legislatures of the states did not intend to give up the state's rights guaranteed and retained under the 10th Amendment. And whatever the legislatures intended the 14th Amendment to mean, is the meaning imparted to that amendment, and is therefore what it means today. Meaning is imparted at inception, not by others, who have their own personal preferences on the matter, later.



Irrespective of the fact that the failure by the southern states to ratify the 14th Amendment at the time resulted in military rule by the federal government in those states, and a federal bypassing of authority of the state legislatures in those states, and then the imposition of the reconstruction acts on those states, all which through coercion prompted the amendment's passing, it would be another eighty years before anyone would imagine that this amendment dealt with any certain states' right to legislate with respect to religion within its borders. That is certified by the fact that two states maintained their laws requiring religious tests until as late at 1877, in the full view of the federal government, and in view of all of the other states, at which time the legislatures of these states, on their own authority, reflecting the will of the people of those states, repealed those requirements.



The Founders respected a state's right to legislate according to the will of its people. That will changes over time. It is transient. But it changes from within. And never, except in the most egregious cases involving the denial of basic human rights, or a violation of a federal contract with a state, did the Founders envision a federal government to impose its will, denying the states their guaranteed sovereignty, for transient reasons. The Declaration of Independence speaks to this principle, however seemingly in reverse, allowing that the people should not revolt against governments for transient reasons. But because the authority of the federal government derives from those same people and from the states, that authority should also not be used by a federal government to revolt against a state's rights for those same transient reasons. Because in America, the federal government receives its authority from the states and from the people of those states, the states and the people are the supreme government, not the federal government. So a usurpation of state's rights by the federal government is every bit the same revolt against authority as a common revolt of the people against an established government. For this reason, the imposition of a federal government's will against the constitutional right of sovereignty of a state, ostensibly using the authority given to it by that same state, should only be used when a state's perceived violation against the rights of a citizen or citizens, has been violated to an egregious degree. Stepping in to ensure the rights of blacks to receive the very same education in government owned and operated institutions of learning, especially when federal funds are being used by that institution, are reasons for federal government intervention. That would be an egregious assault on the rights guaranteed by the equal protection clause. But simply because the citizens of one county seat within a certain state decide of their own volition to place a plaque commemorating the Ten Commandments in their local courthouse, that at best is a transient issue, one owned by the citizens of that county and state to decide, and the federal government therefore has no jurisdiction to intervene. However this court case from 1947, seemingly, has given rise to a whole system of federal powers theretofore unknown to anyone alive, certainly not the people or the states. I expect that the case in question was decided with all good intentions. Cases generally are. But I also doubt that the courts deciding this case, even themselves envisioned that this decision would carry the implications others who have come along afterward infer from it.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 08:03 AM   #19
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Ah yes.......states rights. That's the dog whistle I thought you were coming from.



Thanks, but I much prefer a country where blacks and whites are free to intermarry and where the states - and the feds - are no longer free to impose Jim Crow laws or sharia laws (like DOMA).
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Old October 25th, 2011, 08:37 AM   #20
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Ah yes.......states rights. That's the dog whistle I thought you were coming from.



Thanks, but I much prefer a country where blacks and whites are free to intermarry and where the states - and the feds - are no longer free to impose Jim Crow laws or sharia laws (like DOMA).


I don't like a top-down secularocracy any more than a top-down theocracy. Secularists and theocrats have no problem with the federal government dictating to the states and the people. It's a "holy cause" to both groups.
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