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Old December 6th, 2010, 08:17 PM   #1
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A truly free press — one unfettered by concerns of nationalism — is apparently a terrifying problem for elected governments and tyrannies alike.



It shouldn’t be.



In the past week, after publishing secret U.S. diplomatic cables, secret-spilling site WikiLeaks has been hit with denial-of-service attacks on its servers by unknown parties; its backup hosting provider, Amazon, booted WikiLeaks off its hosting service; and PayPal has suspended its donation-collecting account, damaging WikiLeaks’ ability to raise funds. MasterCard announced Monday it was blocking credit card payments to WikiLeaks, saying the site was engaged in illegal activities, despite the fact it has never been charged with a crime.



Meanwhile, U.S. politicians have ramped up the rhetoric against the nonprofit, calling for the arrest and prosecution and even assassination of its most visible spokesman, Julian Assange. Questions about whether current laws are adequate to prosecute him have prompted lawmakers to propose amending the espionage statute to bring Assange to heel or even to declare WikiLeaks a terrorist organization.



WikiLeaks is not perfect, and we have highlighted many of its shortcomings on this web site. Nevertheless, it’s time to make a clear statement about the value of the site and take sides:



WikiLeaks stands to improve our democracy, not weaken it.



The greatest threat we face right now from Wikileaks is not the information it has spilled and may spill in the future, but the reactionary response to it that’s building in the United States that promises to repudiate the rule of law and our free speech traditions, if left unchecked.



Secrecy is routinely posited as a critical component for effective governance, a premise that’s so widely accepted that even some journalists, whose job is to reveal the secret workings of governments, have declared WikiLeaks’ efforts to be out of bounds.



Transparency, and its value, look very different inside the corridors of power than outside. On the campaign trail, Barack Obama vowed to roll back the secrecy apparatus that had been dramatically expanded under his predecessor, but his administration has largely abandoned those promises and instead doubled-down on secrecy.



One of the core complaints against WikiLeaks is a lack of accountability. It has set up shop in multiple countries with liberal press protections in an apparent bid to stand above the law. It owes allegiance to no one government, and its interests do not align neatly with authorities’. Compare this, for example, to what happened when the U.S. government pressured The New York Times in 2004 to drop its story about warrantless wiretapping on grounds that it would harm national security. The paper withheld the story for a year-and-a-half.



WikiLeaks’ role is not the same as the press’s, since it does not always endeavor to vet information prior to publication. But it operates within what one might call the media ecosystem, feeding publications with original documents that are found nowhere else and insulating them against pressures from governments seeking to suppress information.



Instead of encouraging online service providers to blacklist sites and writing new espionage laws that would further criminalize the publication of government secrets, we should regard WikiLeaks as subject to the same first amendment rights that protect The New York Times. And as a society, we should embrace the site as an expression of the fundamental freedom that is at the core of our Bill of Rights, not react like Chinese corporations that are happy to censor information on behalf of their government to curry favor.



WikiLeaks does not automatically bring radical transparency in its wake. Sites like WikiLeaks work because sources, more often than not pricked by conscience, come forward with information in the public interest. WikiLeaks is a distributor of this information, if an extraordinarily prolific one. It helps guarantee the information won’t be hidden by editors and publishers who are afraid of lawsuits or the government.



WikiLeaks has beaten back the attacks against it with the help of hundreds of mirror sites that will keep its content available, despite the best efforts of opponents. Blocking WikiLeaks, even if it were possible, could never be effective.



A government’s best and only defense against damaging spills is to act justly and fairly. By seeking to quell WikiLeaks, its U.S. political opponents are only priming the pump for more embarrassing revelations down the road.



http://www.wired.com...eaks-editorial/





Wikileaks Mirrors





Mirror List

Wikileaks is currently mirrored on 729 sites (updated 2010-12-06 22:32 GMT)



http://wikileaks.ch/mirrors.html
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Old December 8th, 2010, 06:41 PM   #2
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I think Wikileaks is VERY STRANGE!!!!



After seeing them SEIZE all those domains a couple weeks ago,like www.torrent-finder.com was,ITS QUITE WIERD THEY DIDNT DO THE SAME THING TO WIKILEAKS! (Especially if it IS a legit site which im questioning)
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Old December 8th, 2010, 07:01 PM   #3
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I think Wikileaks is VERY STRANGE!!!!



After seeing them SEIZE all those domains a couple weeks ago,like www.torrent-finder.com was,ITS QUITE WIERD THEY DIDNT DO THE SAME THING TO WIKILEAKS! (Especially if it IS a legit site which im questioning)


Yeah, Wikileaks is indeed strange, Dude. Funny, did you see on Yahoo or AOL News that Libya threatened the UK if they didn't release the Lockerbie bomber, who was supposedly had three months to live with cancer? And he is still alive. The Scottish really fell for it.
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Old December 8th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #4
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The strangest thing about wikileaks is that it really hasn't revealed anything that many people hadn't suspected, anyway. That, and it's doing the job that the press should do in a "free" country.
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Old December 9th, 2010, 03:59 AM   #5
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The strangest thing about wikileaks is that it really hasn't revealed anything that many people hadn't suspected, anyway. That, and it's doing the job that the press should do in a "free" country.


All Will Be Revealed!



http://www.elyrics.n...mir-lyrics.html
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Old December 9th, 2010, 08:02 AM   #6
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The strangest thing about wikileaks is that it really hasn't revealed anything that many people hadn't suspected, anyway. That, and it's doing the job that the press should do in a "free" country.


How much do you think that what Wikileaks publishes is believable anyway?



That's like the late-Joseph McCarthy, who was a self-styled red hunter in the 1950's, who destroyed some careers of politicians in Washington, DC, by claiming they were allied with the Soviet Union then. How much it was believable, you'd have to read about it.



And what Wikileaks is doing is probably destroying friendships and careers of other people. Yeah, it is there to keep people honest. But in a war, doesn't a country have to win at any price without breaking the Geneva Convention rules?



And what has Wikileaks done to show the world what North Korea is doing? The North Koreans must be laughing their asses off, because of what it probably perceived countries like the U.K. and the USA being evil than they are.



Here's one from Australia:





Australian Official Scrambles After WikiLeaks Disclosures



(Dec. 9) -- A member of Australia's Cabinet is scrambling to tout allegiance to his country today after WikiLeaks cables revealed he frequently briefed U.S. diplomats about the inner workings of his government.



Immediately after the WikiLeaks revelations, unknown vandals revised Australian lawmaker Mark Arbib's Wikipedia page to list his job descriptions as "CIA agent, U.S. Mole, Traitor and U.S. Embassy Hero." The material has since been deleted.



A cluster of leaked U.S. diplomatic cables, excerpted on the Sydney Morning Herald's website, list Arbib, an Australian senator and the country's current sports minister, as a "protected" source whose identity should be guarded. They say he's been able to give U.S. officials valuable insider information about Australia's government and power struggles within its ruling Labor Party.



''He has met with us repeatedly throughout his political rise,'' one memo notes. The cables also list two other Australian politicians, a former Labor minister and another member of Parliament, as close sources as well.



Arbib was a key backroom figure in last summer's Australian "coup," in which then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was replaced by Julia Gillard in a Labor Party leadership battle. Arbib was an adviser to Rudd at the time and also a U.S. informant, though there's no evidence that any of his actions were influenced by his meetings with American diplomats.



The senator denies any wrongdoing. He issued a statement today acknowledging that he's met frequently with U.S. officials but saying that essentially such meetings are par for the course.



"I, like many members of the Federal Parliament, have regular discussions about the state of Australian and U.S. politics with members of the U.S. mission and consulate," Arbib said. He noted that he's a member of an Australian-American leadership group that meets regularly and that his alliance with the U.S. is no secret.



"I am publicly known as a strong supporter of Australia's relationship with the United States," his statement said.



Despite Arbib's claim that he's done nothing wrong, Australian media are awash today with such headlines as "Yank in the Ranks" and "Mark Arbib, aka CIA Agent 007."



''Mark Victor Arbib (born 9 November 1971) is an Australian Traitor and spy for America,'' his Wikipedia page read early this morning, according to a screen shot posted on the Morning Herald's website. ''He will join Benedict Arnold and Judas in the afterlife. He is a public enemy and a villain to his people.''



Wikipedia has since deleted that addition.



Some Australian lawmakers are coming to Arbib's defense today. "I completely reject the idea that he is a spy. I just think that's nonsense," fellow Labor Party "coup" architect Bill Shorten, who is now Australia's assistant treasurer, told Sky News.



"I think that the commentary I've seen this morning in the newspapers is dinner party gossip masquerading as U.S. intelligence. ... Each week someone's got to send a report off to America, so they jot down gossip and conversation," Shorten said, according to Agence France-Presse.



Health Minister Nicola Roxon told Australia's ABC News that she also meets with U.S. diplomats from time to time and that there's nothing out of the ordinary about it. "I don't think people should read anything at all sinister into that," she said.



"I meet diplomats from all over the world, from Bangladesh to the U.S. to New Zealand, Taiwan and Beijing," Australian Sen. Bob Brown told the network.



Deputy Prime Minister Wayne Swan told reporters in Brisbane today that everyone should take a "cold shower" over the leaked diplomatic cables, which he said have been taken out of context.



"I think we ought to exercise just a degree of caution when we're interpreting the translation of conversations," he said, according to the Australian Associated Press. "It doesn't mean that the reportage of them in the cables is accurate, it doesn't mean to say it's well grounded and it certainly doesn't mean to say it's in context."



WikiLeaks has continued to publish bundles of secret U.S. diplomatic cables despite the arrest of the group's Australian founder, Julian Assange. He's being held in a London jail in connection with sexual misconduct allegations in Sweden.



Arbib isn't the first public official upon whom suspicion has fallen because of the WikiLeaks cables. Last week, the German foreign minister's chief of staff resigned after admitting that he was the one who passed information to American diplomats during the formation of Chancellor Angela Merkel's government last year.



Critics of WikiLeaks say unmasking U.S. government contacts can put their lives in danger.

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Old December 9th, 2010, 09:11 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by highway80west View Post
How much do you think that what Wikileaks publishes is believable anyway?



That's like the late-Joseph McCarthy, who was a self-styled red hunter in the 1950's, who destroyed some careers of politicians in Washington, DC, by claiming they were allied with the Soviet Union then. How much it was believable, you'd have to read about it.



And what Wikileaks is doing is probably destroying friendships and careers of other people. Yeah, it is there to keep people honest. But in a war, doesn't a country have to win at any price without breaking the Geneva Convention rules?



And what has Wikileaks done to show the world what North Korea is doing? The North Koreans must be laughing their asses off, because of what it probably perceived countries like the U.K. and the USA being evil than they are.



Here's one from Australia:





Australian Official Scrambles After WikiLeaks Disclosures



(Dec. 9) -- A member of Australia's Cabinet is scrambling to tout allegiance to his country today after WikiLeaks cables revealed he frequently briefed U.S. diplomats about the inner workings of his government.



Immediately after the WikiLeaks revelations, unknown vandals revised Australian lawmaker Mark Arbib's Wikipedia page to list his job descriptions as "CIA agent, U.S. Mole, Traitor and U.S. Embassy Hero." The material has since been deleted.



A cluster of leaked U.S. diplomatic cables, excerpted on the Sydney Morning Herald's website, list Arbib, an Australian senator and the country's current sports minister, as a "protected" source whose identity should be guarded. They say he's been able to give U.S. officials valuable insider information about Australia's government and power struggles within its ruling Labor Party.



''He has met with us repeatedly throughout his political rise,'' one memo notes. The cables also list two other Australian politicians, a former Labor minister and another member of Parliament, as close sources as well.



Arbib was a key backroom figure in last summer's Australian "coup," in which then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was replaced by Julia Gillard in a Labor Party leadership battle. Arbib was an adviser to Rudd at the time and also a U.S. informant, though there's no evidence that any of his actions were influenced by his meetings with American diplomats.



The senator denies any wrongdoing. He issued a statement today acknowledging that he's met frequently with U.S. officials but saying that essentially such meetings are par for the course.



"I, like many members of the Federal Parliament, have regular discussions about the state of Australian and U.S. politics with members of the U.S. mission and consulate," Arbib said. He noted that he's a member of an Australian-American leadership group that meets regularly and that his alliance with the U.S. is no secret.



"I am publicly known as a strong supporter of Australia's relationship with the United States," his statement said.



Despite Arbib's claim that he's done nothing wrong, Australian media are awash today with such headlines as "Yank in the Ranks" and "Mark Arbib, aka CIA Agent 007."



''Mark Victor Arbib (born 9 November 1971) is an Australian Traitor and spy for America,'' his Wikipedia page read early this morning, according to a screen shot posted on the Morning Herald's website. ''He will join Benedict Arnold and Judas in the afterlife. He is a public enemy and a villain to his people.''



Wikipedia has since deleted that addition.



Some Australian lawmakers are coming to Arbib's defense today. "I completely reject the idea that he is a spy. I just think that's nonsense," fellow Labor Party "coup" architect Bill Shorten, who is now Australia's assistant treasurer, told Sky News.



"I think that the commentary I've seen this morning in the newspapers is dinner party gossip masquerading as U.S. intelligence. ... Each week someone's got to send a report off to America, so they jot down gossip and conversation," Shorten said, according to Agence France-Presse.



Health Minister Nicola Roxon told Australia's ABC News that she also meets with U.S. diplomats from time to time and that there's nothing out of the ordinary about it. "I don't think people should read anything at all sinister into that," she said.



"I meet diplomats from all over the world, from Bangladesh to the U.S. to New Zealand, Taiwan and Beijing," Australian Sen. Bob Brown told the network.



Deputy Prime Minister Wayne Swan told reporters in Brisbane today that everyone should take a "cold shower" over the leaked diplomatic cables, which he said have been taken out of context.



"I think we ought to exercise just a degree of caution when we're interpreting the translation of conversations," he said, according to the Australian Associated Press. "It doesn't mean that the reportage of them in the cables is accurate, it doesn't mean to say it's well grounded and it certainly doesn't mean to say it's in context."



WikiLeaks has continued to publish bundles of secret U.S. diplomatic cables despite the arrest of the group's Australian founder, Julian Assange. He's being held in a London jail in connection with sexual misconduct allegations in Sweden.



Arbib isn't the first public official upon whom suspicion has fallen because of the WikiLeaks cables. Last week, the German foreign minister's chief of staff resigned after admitting that he was the one who passed information to American diplomats during the formation of Chancellor Angela Merkel's government last year.



Critics of WikiLeaks say unmasking U.S. government contacts can put their lives in danger.



People do become concerned when their asses are bared. I haven't heard one doubt cast upon the cables' authenticity.



The problem here isn't the leaks. The problem is what is considered SOP, and the lies told to the American people.



The old tactic of "killing the messenger" is in full swing here....
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Old December 9th, 2010, 09:20 AM   #8
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People do become concerned when their asses are bared. I haven't heard one doubt cast upon the cables' authenticity.



The problem here isn't the leaks. The problem is what is considered SOP, and the lies told to the American people.



The old tactic of "killing the messenger" is in full swing here....




All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. — Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher (1788 – 1860)
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Old December 9th, 2010, 09:37 AM   #9
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All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. — Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher (1788 – 1860)


I tell you what: you must be pretty well scholared in philosophy. You've quoted a lot of them here on DTT, more than I can ever think of.



And I got an A in my philosophy class in college, even though I could not understand some of it. I had the second highest score in the final exam, my professor told me a couple of days later when I was looking for my test score at his office. He was a gentle giant of a man who easily could look like an old-time pro wrestler since he either had his head shaved or he was completely bald in his genes.



He often wore a shirt that showed a bald man, with the words that said, "Ye though I walk through the valley in the shadow of death, you shall fear no evil, for I am the meanest sonuvabitch in the valley."
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Old December 9th, 2010, 11:58 AM   #10
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Refresh this a few times:



http://sowhyiswikileaksagoodthingagain.com/
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