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Old June 25th, 2017, 05:50 PM   #21
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Almost two years ago, I wrote an article for Politico endorsing Donald Trump for president. It was a tongue-in-cheek effort—I “supported” Trump only because I thought he would lose to Hillary Clinton, disastrously, and that his defeat would cleanse the Republican Party of the extremism and nuttiness that drove me out of it. I had hoped that post-2016, what remained of the moderate wing of the GOP would reassert itself as it did after the Goldwater debacle in 1964, and exorcise the crazies.

Trump was a guaranteed loser, I thought. In the Virginia presidential primary, I even voted for him, hoping to hasten the party’s demise. In the weeks before the November election, I predicted a Clinton presidency would fix much of what ails our country. On November 8, I voted for Clinton and left the ballot booth reasonably sure she would win.

Needless to say, I was as dumbfounded by the election results as Max Bialystock was by the success of “Springtime for Hitler.” For two months after Trump won, I couldn’t read any news about the election, and considered abandoning political commentary permanently. It wasn’t just that Trump disgusted me; I was disgusted with myself for being so stupid. I no longer trusted my own powers of observation and analysis.

Almost everything that has happened since November 8 has been the inverse of what I’d imagined. Trump didn’t lose; he won. The Republican Party isn’t undergoing some sort of reckoning over what it believes; his branch of the Republican Party has taken control. Most troubling, perhaps, is that rather than reassert themselves, the moderate Republicans have almost all rolled over entirely.

Trump has turned out to be far, far worse than I imagined. He has instituted policies so right wing they make Ronald Reagan, for whom I worked, look like a liberal Democrat. He has appointed staff people far to the right of the Republican mainstream in many positions, and they are instituting policies that are frighteningly extreme. Environmental Protection Administration Administrator Scott Pruitt proudly denies the existence of climate change, and is doing his best to implement every item Big Oil has had on its wish list since the agency was established by Richard Nixon. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is actively hostile to the very concept of public education and is doing her best to abolish it. Every day, Attorney General Jeff Sessions institutes some new policy to take incarceration and law enforcement back to the Dark Ages. Trump’s proposed budget would eviscerate the social safety net for the sole purpose of giving huge tax cuts to the ultrawealthy.

And if those policies weren’t enough, conservatives—who, after all, believe in liberty and a system of checks and balances to restrain the government to its proper role—have plenty of reason to be upset by those actions Trump has taken that transcend our traditional right-left ideological divide. He’s voiced not only skepticism of NATO, but outright hostility to it. He’s pulled America back from its role as an international advocate for human rights. He’s attacked the notion of an independent judiciary. He personally intervened to request the FBI to ease up on its investigation of a former adviser of his, then fired FBI Director James Comey and freely admitted he did so to alleviate the pressure he felt from Comey’s investigation. For those conservatives who were tempted to embrace a “wait-and-see” approach to Trump, what they’ve seen, time and again, is almost unimaginable.

And yet as surprising as this all has been, it’s also the natural outgrowth of 30 years of Republican pandering to the lowest common denominator in American politics. Trump is what happens when a political party abandons ideas, demonizes intellectuals, degrades politics and simply pursues power for the sake of power.

continue reading...

?Trump Is What Happens When a Political Party Abandons Ideas? - POLITICO Magazine
I love the the liberal meltdown.
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Old June 26th, 2017, 03:19 AM   #22
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Don't bother. Someday for you...has already gone.
Duw, there's deep. Like the cess-pool you live in, I suppose!
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Old June 26th, 2017, 09:10 AM   #23
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Honestly--between you and R to L--what a bunch a twaddle. The Democrats LOST an election. For the love of Mike. People act/talk like it's the first time in the history of the world! The Democratic Party isn't dead or dying or on life support. IT LOST. An election. AND here's a news flash: America has another election in 4 years---and another 4 years after that, etc. etc. etc.

Half the pop didn't vote, folks. Trump got about 1/4 of the people in this nation to vote for him. 25-26%. Do you get that?? That's the GOP squeaking by--NOT the Dems dying.

Donald Trump did not win the election so much as Hillary Clinton lost it. In 2012, President Obama won with almost 66 million votes; Clinton’s total was just over 62 million. Does that sound like a party ready to call 911??

If the voters show up (which they didn't) voting records are stable. White voters supported the Republican candidate in the past four presidential elections (2004-2016). Similarly, here’s the share of African American voters who backed the Democratic candidate: 88, 95, 93, 88.

Now pay attention, boys. Try to recall Barry Goldwater’s crushing defeat in 1964. After Watergate, Republicans seemed doomed but then came a rally--Ronald Reagan’s two successful terms, followed by the election of George H.W. Bush in 1988. THE GOP on top.
In each case, something (Vietnam, double-digit inflation, recession) altered the calculus and confirmed the long-standing roots of U.S. politics: When Americans are unhappy, they throw out the party in the White House.

THAT's what happened. Now move on and stop spinning this strudel in your noodle. Political parties don't DIE that easily.
Honestly, that is the most scripted piece of writing I have ever seen. I actually feel like I should check to see if its plagiarism. Here is what you need to know.
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Following the 2014 midterm wave, Republicans dominated state legislatures at a rate not seen since the Civil War. Democrats had hoped to rebound in 2016, but thanks in part to Trump’s resilience and widespread Republican gerrymandering, they only made modest gains. Democrats flipped four chambers, but lost control of three, leaving Republicans in charge of 68 state legislative chambers and Democrats just 31.

The above map illustrates the balance of legislative power in state legislatures nationwide. Republicans control both chambers in 32 states, including 17 with veto-proof majorities. Those 32 states cover 61 percent of the U.S. population. Democrats, meanwhile, control the legislature in just 13 states, amounting to 28 percent of the country’s population; only five of those chambers have veto-proof majorities.

With a firm grip on the presidency, Congress, and soon the Supreme Court, Republicans have won more political power in 2016 than in any election since at least 1928, when Herbert Hoover was elected to the White House. Democrats now face a deep hole they need to climb out of to fight back against the coming reactionary policy shift of the pending Trump administration and its allied state governments.
https://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/...d-33-governors

Now, that is from Daily Kos, whom I believe is very leftist. The only thing I disagree with in that paragraph is the blame of gerrymandering. The reason I disagree is very simple. You can not gerrymander a Gubernatorial election.
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Old June 26th, 2017, 12:33 PM   #24
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Honestly, that is the most scripted piece of writing I have ever seen. I actually feel like I should check to see if its plagiarism. Here is what you need to know.

https://www.dailykos.com/story/2016/...d-33-governors

Now, that is from Daily Kos, whom I believe is very leftist. The only thing I disagree with in that paragraph is the blame of gerrymandering. The reason I disagree is very simple. You can not gerrymander a Gubernatorial election.


Haaa....well, YES. MY data is plagiarized. So are my names, dates, and outcomes. Obviously, it's just my opinion that your post is twaddle---but I supposed if you looked hard enough you could find an article with that word too. But you are missing the point and here's another piece of plagiarism.

The last time an American political party died was in 1854. It was the Whigs. (Wiki) But they didn't really die--they just morphed into another political arena. That was called the Republican Party.
The GOP has ruled the school before (these dates are plagiarized): from 1921-30, from 1953-54, from 2003-06....and dang it. The Democratic Party came out swinging--again and again.

So, again. Political parties don't die easily. The Dems may be down but they certainly aren't out. The pendulum ALWAYS swings to the Left....eventually.
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Old June 26th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #25
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One thing that stands out with me is that in my opinion, Trump knows nothing about governance or legislative politics whatsoever. He has never had the experience. He was a businessman, a celebrity. Also, has never served in the military which even for lowly enlisted teaches a lot about delegation of authority and personal politics.

Sort of goes back to business people who get into politics and say "I will run the government like a business." It doesn't work that way. Government and business are two different distinct things. Sounds good, doesn't work. I think Trump thought he could run stuff like a dictator or CEO and anything he says gets done. Does'nt work like that.

My worry now is that other people with absolutely no governance experience jumping in. For instance, "The Rock" a former wrestler turned actor is interested. I doubt it but probably Tom Hanks too. Tom Hanks could get elected because he is so popular.
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Old June 28th, 2017, 03:53 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by senor boogie woogie View Post
One thing that stands out with me is that in my opinion, Trump knows nothing about governance or legislative politics whatsoever. He has never had the experience. He was a businessman, a celebrity. Also, has never served in the military which even for lowly enlisted teaches a lot about delegation of authority and personal politics.

Sort of goes back to business people who get into politics and say "I will run the government like a business." It doesn't work that way. Government and business are two different distinct things. Sounds good, doesn't work. I think Trump thought he could run stuff like a dictator or CEO and anything he says gets done. Does'nt work like that.

My worry now is that other people with absolutely no governance experience jumping in. For instance, "The Rock" a former wrestler turned actor is interested. I doubt it but probably Tom Hanks too. Tom Hanks could get elected because he is so popular.
Sounds like you want to keep an elite class in charge and make sure the peasants no their place huh masta
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Old June 28th, 2017, 04:20 PM   #27
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I love the the liberal meltdown.
Think of it like football game, one team moves the ball, then loses it on downs, the other moves it, punts, back and forth, it's all about field position.

Well, we don't have the socialist cradle to grave system that they have in Europe.
But we do have Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Food Stamps, AFDC, ObamaCare, etc.
We keep adding, and the backlash happens, but not like Iran, where the response to modernity was the Ayatollahs, we get a little movement to the right, but the GOP sucks at governing, and that lays the foundation for the next Democratic wave, and the next leap forward.

The GOP health Care bill is polling between 12% and 16% favorability.
With the majority opposed in almost every state, and a plurality opposed in even in the Reddest states.

Where do you think that leads?
Either the GOP rams through the most unpopular legislation in history or they fail.
And Since January, ObamaCare has polled favorably.

1/3 of the people Mitch McConnell represents, are on Medicaid.


If you can't see where the next Democratic majority is coming from, you aren't looking very hard.
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Last edited by goober; June 29th, 2017 at 03:40 PM.
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Old June 29th, 2017, 03:19 AM   #28
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Sounds like you want to keep an elite class in charge and make sure the peasants no their place huh masta
Whereas you believe in that revolutionary Son of Toil, the starveling Fartman! Jesus wept!
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Old June 29th, 2017, 09:09 AM   #29
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Whereas you believe in that revolutionary Son of Toil, the starveling Fartman! Jesus wept!
And he played second base, and they kept yelling hey Zeus at him. Silly deities always getting confused.
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Old June 29th, 2017, 09:12 AM   #30
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Duw, there's deep. Like the cess-pool you live in, I suppose!


Speaking of cesspools. I suppose by now you've all seen the most recent tweets?? Trump "heard poorly-rated Morning Joe speaks badly of me...Then how come low I.Q. Crazy Mika, along with Psycho Joe, came..
...to Mar-a-Lago 3 nights in a row around New Year's Eve, and insisted on joining me. She was bleeding badly from a face-lift. I said no!"

Posted by THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA??? And Trump wonders why he gets negative press? Jeesh. Can't the media find something positive to say about the president?? Obviously NOT since every day is a new round of nasty, personal bully tactics directed at SOMEONE--SOMEWHERE--because Donny Dude can't BEAR to be criticized.

"MSNBC has released a statement: “It’s a sad day for America when the president spends his time bullying, lying and spewing petty personal attacks instead of doing his job.”
That’s not media bias; that’s descriptive journalism. To paraphrase Harry S. Truman, the media isn’t giving Trump hell. It’s reporting on his tweets, and his critics just think it’s hell."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...=.47d3e6c9e3b0
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