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Old April 18th, 2017, 03:29 PM   #1
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Clean Coal: Carbon Capture and Enhanced Oil Recovery

Cheers to them for upscaling without any additional federal funds.

Quote:
Secretary of Energy Rick Perry took part in a ribbon-cutting ceremony today to mark the opening of Petra Nova, the world’s largest post-combustion carbon capture project, which was completed on-schedule and on-budget. The large-scale demonstration project, located at the W.A. Parish power plant in Thompsons, Texas, is a joint venture between NRG Energy (NRG) and JX Nippon Oil & Gas Exploration Corporation (JX).

“I commend all those who contributed to this major achievement,” said Secretary Perry. “While the Petra Nova project will certainly benefit Texas, it also demonstrates that clean coal technologies can have a meaningful and positive impact on the Nation’s energy security and economic growth.”

Funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and originally conceived as a 60-megawatt electric (MWe) capture project, the project sponsors expanded the design to capture emissions from 240 MWe of generation at the Houston-area power plant, quadrupling the size of the capture project without additional federal investment. During performance testing, the system demonstrated a carbon capture rate of more than 90 percent.

At its current level of operation, Petra Nova will capture more than 5,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per day, which will be used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) at the West Ranch Oil Field. The project is expected to boost production at West Ranch from 500 barrels per day to approximately 15,000 barrels per day. It is estimated that the field holds 60 million barrels of oil recoverable from EOR operations.

...

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/04/...-oil-recovery/



Last edited by excalibur; April 18th, 2017 at 03:33 PM.
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Old April 18th, 2017, 03:34 PM   #2
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1) The coal plants still belch out heavy metals and carcinogens and make lots of particulates and ash.

2) The CO2 pumped into the ground to help extract the oil is then pumped out with the oil and released into the atmosphere. It just delays it for a few months.

Big whoopee.
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Old April 18th, 2017, 04:49 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by RNG View Post
1) The coal plants still belch out heavy metals and carcinogens and make lots of particulates and ash.

2) The CO2 pumped into the ground to help extract the oil is then pumped out with the oil and released into the atmosphere. It just delays it for a few months.

Big whoopee.
1) needs to be monitored and limited.


2) is not pollution and we do not need to worry about that at all.
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Old April 18th, 2017, 05:31 PM   #4
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1) needs to be monitored and limited.


2) is not pollution and we do not need to worry about that at all.
1) It is monitored, or can be. But the only way to limit the biggies is to limit the amount of coal burned.

2) Read a science text.
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Old April 18th, 2017, 06:11 PM   #5
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Yeah, CO2 at 400ppm is no problem, unless record crops are seen as a problem.

Still waiting for the warmists to show us where that 'magic thermostat' is located, and what sort of climate they think is ideal. The pre 1850 climate, is that their goal?



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Old April 18th, 2017, 06:13 PM   #6
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Hmmmm...."clean" coal, aye?

Quote:

The National Emissions Inventory prepared by EPA indicates that emissions to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants:

...contain 84 of the 187 hazardous air pollutant identified by EPA as posing a threat to human health and the environment.

...release 386,000 tons of hazardous air pollutants annually that account for 40% of all hazardous air pollutant emissions from point sources, more than any other point source category.

...are the largest point source category of hydrochloric acid, mercury, and arsenic releases to air.

(USEPA 2007)

Coal-fired power plants are also a major source of emissions for several criteria air pollutants; including sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter.


https://www.csu.edu/cerc/researchrep...Plants2011.pdf
But alas, these pollutants are nothing but a part of...ummmm...fresh air. So, nothing to worry about from "clean" coal.

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Old April 18th, 2017, 06:53 PM   #7
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Some more fun facts about..ummm..."clean" coal.:

Quote:

There are numerous damaging environmental impacts of coal that occur through its mining, preparation, combustion, waste storage, and transport. This article provides an overview. Each topic is explored in greater depth in separate articles, as are several related topics:

Acid mine drainage (AMD) refers to the outflow of acidic water from coal mines or metal mines, often abandoned mines where ore- or coal mining activities have exposed rocks containing the sulphur-bearing mineral pyrite. Pyrite reacts with air and water to form sulphuric acid and dissolved iron, and as water washes through mines, this compound forms a dilute acid, which can wash into nearby rivers and streams.[1]

Air pollution from coal-fired power plants includes sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter (PM), and heavy metals, leading to smog, acid rain, toxins in the environment, and numerous respiratory, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular effects.[2]

Air pollution from coal mines is mainly due to emissions of particulate matter and gases including methane (CH4), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO).[3]

Climate impacts of coal plants - Coal-fired power plants are responsible for one-third of America’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, making coal a huge contributor to global warming.[4] Black carbon resulting from incomplete combustion is an additional contributor to climate change.[5]

Coal dust stirred up during the mining process, as well as released during coal transport, which can cause severe and potentially deadly respiratory problems.[6]

Coal fires occur in both abandoned coal mines and coal waste piles. Internationally, thousands of underground coal fires are burning now. Global coal fire emissions are estimated to include 40 tons of mercury going into the atmosphere annually, and three percent of the world's annual carbon dioxide emissions.[7][8]

Coal combustion waste is the nation's second largest waste stream after municipal solid waste.[9] It is disposed of in landfills or "surface impoundments," which are lined with compacted clay soil, a plastic sheet, or both. As rain filters through the toxic ash pits year after year, the toxic metals are leached out into the local environment.[10][11]

Coal sludge, also known as slurry, is the liquid coal waste generated by washing coal. It is typically disposed of at impoundments located near coal mines, but in some cases it is directly injected into abandoned underground mines. Since coal sludge contains toxins, leaks or spills can endanger underground and surface waters.[2]

Forest destruction caused by mountaintop removal mining - According to a 2010 study, mountaintop removal mining has destroyed 6.8% of Appalachia's forests.[12][13]

Greenhouse gas emissions caused by surface mining - According to a 2010 study, mountaintop removal mining releases large amounts of carbon through clearcutting and burning of trees and through releases of carbon in soil brought to the surface by mining operations. These greenhouse gas emissions amount to at least 7% of conventional power plant emissions.[14][15]

Loss or degradation of groundwater - Since coal seams are often serve as underground aquifers, removal of coal beds may result in drastic changes in hydrology after mining has been completed.

Radical disturbance of 8.4 million acres of farmland, rangeland, and forests, most of which has not been reclaimed -- See The footprint of coal
Heavy metals and coal - Coal contains many heavy metals, as it is created through compressed organic matter containing virtually every element in the periodic table - mainly carbon, but also heavy metals. The heavy metal content of coal varies by coal seam and geographic region. Small amounts of heavy metals can be necessary for health, but too much may cause acute or chronic toxicity (poisoning). Many of the heavy metals released in the mining and burning of coal are environmentally and biologically toxic elements, such as lead, mercury, nickel, tin, cadmium, antimony, and arsenic, as well as radio isotopes of thorium and strontium.[16][17][18]

Mercury and coal - Emissions from coal-fired power plants are the largest source of mercury in the United States, accounting for about 41 percent (48 tons in 1999) of industrial releases.[19]

Methane released by coal mining accounts for about 10 percent of US releases of methane (CH4), a potent global warming gas.[20]

Mountaintop removal mining and other forms of surface mining can lead to the drastic alteration of landscapes, destruction of habitat, damages to water supplies, and air pollution. Not all of these effects can be adequately addressed through coal mine reclamation.

Particulates and coal - Particulate matter (PM) includes the tiny particles of fly ash and dust that are expelled from coal-burning power plants.[21] Studies have shown that exposure to particulate matter is related to an increase of respiratory and cardiac mortality.[22] [23]

Radioactivity and coal - Coal contains minor amounts of the radioactive elements, uranium and thorium. When coal is burned, the fly ash contains uranium and thorium "at up to 10 times their original levels."[24]

Subsidence - Land subsidence may occur after any type of underground mining, but it is particularly common in the case of longwall mining.[25]

Sulfur dioxide and coal - Coal-fired power plants are the largest human-caused source of sulfur dioxide, a pollutant gas that contributes to the production of acid rain and causes significant health problems. Coal naturally contains sulfur, and when coal is burned, the sulfur combines with oxygen to form sulfur oxides.[26]
Thermal pollution from coal plants is the degradation of water quality by power plants and industrial manufacturers - when water used as a coolant is returned to the natural environment at a higher temperature, the change in temperature impacts organisms by decreasing oxygen supply, and affecting ecosystem composition.[27]

Toxins - According to a July 2011 NRDC report, "How Power Plants Contaminate Our Air and States" electricity generation in the U.S. releases 381,740,601 lbs. of toxic air pollution annually, or 49% of total national emissions, based on data from the EPA’s Toxic Release Inventory (2009 data, accessed June 2011). Power plants are the leading sources of toxic air pollution in all but four of the top 20 states by electric sector emissions.

Transportation - Coal is often transported via trucks, railroads, and large cargo ships, which release air pollution such as soot and can lead to disasters that ruin the environment, such as the Shen Neng 1 coal carrier collision with the Great Barrier Reef, Australia that occurred in April 2010.

Waste coal, also known as "culm," "gob," or "boney," is made up of unused coal mixed with soil and rock from previous mining operations. Runoff from waste coal sites can pollute local water supplies.[28]

Water consumption from coal plants - Power generation has been estimated to be second only to agriculture in being the largest domestic user of water.[29]
Water pollution from coal includes the negative health and environmental effects from the mining, processing, burning, and waste storage of coal.


Environmental impacts of coal - SourceWatch
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Old April 19th, 2017, 03:31 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by excalibur View Post
Yeah, CO2 at 400ppm is no problem, unless record crops are seen as a problem.

Still waiting for the warmists to show us where that 'magic thermostat' is located, and what sort of climate they think is ideal. The pre 1850 climate, is that their goal?



There was a scientific study done some years back by a major university. In a controlled outside environment CO2 was released to see if the plants grow bigger or smaller and the test area was several acres in size. The plants grew smaller and many died which is counterintuitive to High School educated graduates and most likely to college educated botanists.
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Old April 19th, 2017, 04:54 AM   #9
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I'm a little befuddled here, boys, and correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't it the GOP (not too long ago) who wanted to shut down the Dept of Energy?? AND isn't it true that Petra Nova benefitted from a $190 million Clean Coal grant from the U.S. Department of Energy...?

But of course, silly me. Rick Perry has an "R" after his name....so it's all good.
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Old April 19th, 2017, 05:18 AM   #10
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I'm a little befuddled here, boys, and correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't it the GOP (not too long ago) who wanted to shut down the Dept of Energy?? AND isn't it true that Petra Nova benefitted from a $190 million Clean Coal grant from the U.S. Department of Energy...?

But of course, silly me. Rick Perry has an "R" after his name....so it's all good.
I can tell by your recent writings that you are depressed. Stop taking Prozac if you are doing it! As Hollywood said take a walk in the woods.
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