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Old August 4th, 2017, 01:44 PM   #1
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Now the SJW's come for Engineering schools

It is Mao's Cultural Revolution, albeit in slow-motion. But make no mistake, the ends sought are the same.

One of the features of their growing power is the phenomenon of “engineering education” programs and schools. They have sought out the soft underbelly of engineering, where phrases such as “diversity” and “different perspectives” and “racial gaps” and “unfairness” and “unequal outcomes” make up the daily vocabulary. Instead of calculating engine horsepower or microchip power/size ratios or aerodynamic lift and drag, the engineering educationists focus on group representation, hurt feelings, and “microaggressions” in the profession.

An excellent example is the establishment at Purdue University (once informally called the “MIT of the Midwest”) of a whole School of Engineering Education. What is this school’s purpose? Its website tells us that it “envisions a more socially connected and scholarly engineering education. This implies that we radically rethink the boundaries of engineering and the purpose of engineering education.”

I have always thought my own education in engineering was as scholarly as possible. Once I became a professor, I never worried about how “socially connected” the education we provided at Michigan State for engineering students was. With trepidation, I read on to see if I was missing something important. I learned to my dismay that Purdue’s engineering education school rests on three bizarre pillars: “reimagining engineering and engineering education, creating field-shaping knowledge, and empowering agents of change.”

...

The recently appointed dean of Purdue’s school, Dr. Donna Riley, has an ambitious agenda.

In her words (italics mine): “I seek to revise engineering curricula to be relevant to a fuller range of student experiences and career destinations, integrating concerns related to public policy, professional ethics, and social responsibility; de-centering Western civilization; and uncovering contributions of women and other underrepresented groups…. We examine how technology influences and is influenced by globalization, capitalism, and colonialism…. Gender is a key…[theme]…[throughout] the course…. We…[examine]… racist and colonialist projects in science….”

That starts off innocently enough, discussing the intersection of engineering with public policy and ethics, but then veers off the rails once Riley begins disparaging the free movement of capital, the role of Western civilization, and the nature of men, specifically “colonialist” white men. How can it improve the practice of engineering to bring in such diversions and distractions?

Riley’s purpose seems not to be how best to train new engineers but to let everyone know how bad engineers have been, how they continue to “oppress” women and persons of color, how much we need “diverse perspectives,” and how the “struggle” continues to level all distinctions and differences in society.

Lest the reader believe I exaggerate, let him peruse a periodical called the Journal of Engineering Education, the Society for Engineering Education’s flagship journal. In each number, readers find at least one article with a title such as “Diversifying the Engineering Workforce” or “Understanding Student Difference” (January, 2005, Vol. 94, No. 1).

I chose this volume at random, but they are all like that. The first section of the latter article is “Three Facets of Student Diversity” in which the authors explain how to “motivate” and “retain” students in engineering, the emphasis being on minorities and women. We’re told that “diversity in education refers to the effects of gender and ethnicity on student performance.” Issues like “validation” and “learning styles” are discussed, and of course the instructor must teach “to address all three forms of diversity.”

...

https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017...l-engineering/
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Old August 4th, 2017, 01:56 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Maverick View Post
It is Mao's Cultural Revolution, albeit in slow-motion. But make no mistake, the ends sought are the same.

One of the features of their growing power is the phenomenon of “engineering education” programs and schools. They have sought out the soft underbelly of engineering, where phrases such as “diversity” and “different perspectives” and “racial gaps” and “unfairness” and “unequal outcomes” make up the daily vocabulary. Instead of calculating engine horsepower or microchip power/size ratios or aerodynamic lift and drag, the engineering educationists focus on group representation, hurt feelings, and “microaggressions” in the profession.

An excellent example is the establishment at Purdue University (once informally called the “MIT of the Midwest”) of a whole School of Engineering Education. What is this school’s purpose? Its website tells us that it “envisions a more socially connected and scholarly engineering education. This implies that we radically rethink the boundaries of engineering and the purpose of engineering education.”

I have always thought my own education in engineering was as scholarly as possible. Once I became a professor, I never worried about how “socially connected” the education we provided at Michigan State for engineering students was. With trepidation, I read on to see if I was missing something important. I learned to my dismay that Purdue’s engineering education school rests on three bizarre pillars: “reimagining engineering and engineering education, creating field-shaping knowledge, and empowering agents of change.”

...

The recently appointed dean of Purdue’s school, Dr. Donna Riley, has an ambitious agenda.

In her words (italics mine): “I seek to revise engineering curricula to be relevant to a fuller range of student experiences and career destinations, integrating concerns related to public policy, professional ethics, and social responsibility; de-centering Western civilization; and uncovering contributions of women and other underrepresented groups…. We examine how technology influences and is influenced by globalization, capitalism, and colonialism…. Gender is a key…[theme]…[throughout] the course…. We…[examine]… racist and colonialist projects in science….”

That starts off innocently enough, discussing the intersection of engineering with public policy and ethics, but then veers off the rails once Riley begins disparaging the free movement of capital, the role of Western civilization, and the nature of men, specifically “colonialist” white men. How can it improve the practice of engineering to bring in such diversions and distractions?

Riley’s purpose seems not to be how best to train new engineers but to let everyone know how bad engineers have been, how they continue to “oppress” women and persons of color, how much we need “diverse perspectives,” and how the “struggle” continues to level all distinctions and differences in society.

Lest the reader believe I exaggerate, let him peruse a periodical called the Journal of Engineering Education, the Society for Engineering Education’s flagship journal. In each number, readers find at least one article with a title such as “Diversifying the Engineering Workforce” or “Understanding Student Difference” (January, 2005, Vol. 94, No. 1).

I chose this volume at random, but they are all like that. The first section of the latter article is “Three Facets of Student Diversity” in which the authors explain how to “motivate” and “retain” students in engineering, the emphasis being on minorities and women. We’re told that “diversity in education refers to the effects of gender and ethnicity on student performance.” Issues like “validation” and “learning styles” are discussed, and of course the instructor must teach “to address all three forms of diversity.”

...

https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017...l-engineering/
I would start Engineering 101 with Thermodynamics. If the students can't keep up with the course material, booted.
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Old August 4th, 2017, 03:06 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Maverick View Post
It is Mao's Cultural Revolution, albeit in slow-motion. But make no mistake, the ends sought are the same.

One of the features of their growing power is the phenomenon of “engineering education” programs and schools. They have sought out the soft underbelly of engineering, where phrases such as “diversity” and “different perspectives” and “racial gaps” and “unfairness” and “unequal outcomes” make up the daily vocabulary. Instead of calculating engine horsepower or microchip power/size ratios or aerodynamic lift and drag, the engineering educationists focus on group representation, hurt feelings, and “microaggressions” in the profession.

An excellent example is the establishment at Purdue University (once informally called the “MIT of the Midwest”) of a whole School of Engineering Education. What is this school’s purpose? Its website tells us that it “envisions a more socially connected and scholarly engineering education. This implies that we radically rethink the boundaries of engineering and the purpose of engineering education.”

I have always thought my own education in engineering was as scholarly as possible. Once I became a professor, I never worried about how “socially connected” the education we provided at Michigan State for engineering students was. With trepidation, I read on to see if I was missing something important. I learned to my dismay that Purdue’s engineering education school rests on three bizarre pillars: “reimagining engineering and engineering education, creating field-shaping knowledge, and empowering agents of change.”

...

The recently appointed dean of Purdue’s school, Dr. Donna Riley, has an ambitious agenda.

In her words (italics mine): “I seek to revise engineering curricula to be relevant to a fuller range of student experiences and career destinations, integrating concerns related to public policy, professional ethics, and social responsibility; de-centering Western civilization; and uncovering contributions of women and other underrepresented groups…. We examine how technology influences and is influenced by globalization, capitalism, and colonialism…. Gender is a key…[theme]…[throughout] the course…. We…[examine]… racist and colonialist projects in science….”

That starts off innocently enough, discussing the intersection of engineering with public policy and ethics, but then veers off the rails once Riley begins disparaging the free movement of capital, the role of Western civilization, and the nature of men, specifically “colonialist” white men. How can it improve the practice of engineering to bring in such diversions and distractions?

Riley’s purpose seems not to be how best to train new engineers but to let everyone know how bad engineers have been, how they continue to “oppress” women and persons of color, how much we need “diverse perspectives,” and how the “struggle” continues to level all distinctions and differences in society.

Lest the reader believe I exaggerate, let him peruse a periodical called the Journal of Engineering Education, the Society for Engineering Education’s flagship journal. In each number, readers find at least one article with a title such as “Diversifying the Engineering Workforce” or “Understanding Student Difference” (January, 2005, Vol. 94, No. 1).

I chose this volume at random, but they are all like that. The first section of the latter article is “Three Facets of Student Diversity” in which the authors explain how to “motivate” and “retain” students in engineering, the emphasis being on minorities and women. We’re told that “diversity in education refers to the effects of gender and ethnicity on student performance.” Issues like “validation” and “learning styles” are discussed, and of course the instructor must teach “to address all three forms of diversity.”

...

https://www.jamesgmartin.center/2017...l-engineering/
You sound like a member of the Taliban moaning about women learning to read.
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Old August 4th, 2017, 03:09 PM   #4
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@Maverick,

Dude, feel free to not enroll at Purdue. *shrug*
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Old August 4th, 2017, 03:38 PM   #5
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You sound like a member of the Taliban moaning about women learning to read.
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@Maverick,

Dude, feel free to not enroll at Purdue. *shrug*


Two of the dumbest replies one could ever imagine regarding the OP and what is happening at engineering schools (Purdue is just one example, and is one of the greatest such schools in the world, or was). But what can one expect from the short-bus crowd? At least the second one required some thought, some.
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Old August 4th, 2017, 03:53 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Maverick View Post
Two of the dumbest replies one could ever imagine regarding the OP and what is happening at engineering schools (Purdue is just one example, and is one of the greatest such schools in the world, or was). But what can one expect from the short-bus crowd? At least the second one required some thought, some.
Why was mine dumb?
It seems you do not approve of the engineering courses at Purdue.
Are you attempting to imply this is SOP at ALL engineering schools? I take note you say "at engineering schools" but not ALL engineering schools or at "some" a "few", "many", etc. etc.
So, don't go to Purdue or any other than has the same policy.
Problem is what? What are you afraid of anyway? That the school is not producing qualified & skilled engineering or what?

If they are "the short-bus crowd" how did they get in a position to run major universities, such as "the MIT of the Midwest?"
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Old August 4th, 2017, 03:59 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Maverick View Post
Two of the dumbest replies one could ever imagine regarding the OP and what is happening at engineering schools (Purdue is just one example, and is one of the greatest such schools in the world, or was). But what can one expect from the short-bus crowd? At least the second one required some thought, some.
That is the response that conservatives like you and the Taliban and the Ayatollahs and Bin Laden and the Klan for that matter have to progress.

Maybe the flavor of your mystical cult is different, but the main thrust is that your imaginary friend finds progress offensive....
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Old August 4th, 2017, 04:51 PM   #8
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That is the response that conservatives like you and the Taliban and the Ayatollahs and Bin Laden and the Klan for that matter have to progress.

Maybe the flavor of your mystical cult is different, but the main thrust is that your imaginary friend finds progress offensive....




I have zero idea what you are rambling on about ("mystical cult" and all the rest). And what any of your two posts have to do with the OP. Prescription meds you're using there, or are you self-medicating?
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Old August 4th, 2017, 06:35 PM   #9
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I have zero idea what you are rambling on about ("mystical cult" and all the rest). And what any of your two posts have to do with the OP. Prescription meds you're using there, or are you self-medicating?
I just assume your God finds progress offensive.
The idea that an engineering program should reach out to women and minorities, should teach people to consider the full impact of their work.
You seemed outraged.
That is the reaction of deeply conservative people, like the Taliban, to progress.

You do hate progress right?
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Old August 4th, 2017, 08:03 PM   #10
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I just assume your God finds progress offensive.
The idea that an engineering program should reach out to women and minorities, should teach people to consider the full impact of their work.
You seemed outraged.
That is the reaction of deeply conservative people, like the Taliban, to progress.

You do hate progress right?

You would have to explain what your rantings have to do with the OP. And how what is described in the OP is "progress".
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