Political Forums  

Go Back   Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Education

Education Educational System Forum - For topics and discussions about the educational system


Thanks Tree18Thanks
  • 3 Post By Clara007
  • 1 Post By Clara007
  • 5 Post By RNG
  • 3 Post By imaginethat
  • 1 Post By Camelot
  • 1 Post By imaginethat
  • 1 Post By skews13
  • 3 Post By BubbaJones
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 4th, 2016, 07:21 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Clara007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Arizona
Posts: 7,261
Lightbulb Oregon is Investing in Blue Collar Skills

How Oregon is investing in the next generation of blue collar workers | PBS NewsHour

Our nation has been extremely concerned with "JOBS" and our unemployment rate. This article speaks to the need for blue collar skills, vocational education and/or retraining those who want to get back into the job market where these blue collar skills are desperately needed.
Here's an excerpt: "Last summer, two-thirds of Oregon employers reported to the Oregon employment department difficulty filling job vacancies, saying they werenít receiving enough applicants or too many applicants lacked the necessary skills. This mismatch is nationwide. The National Skills Coalition, a Washington, D.C. group that advocates for worker training, says while 15 percent of U.S. jobs are low skilled, and 31 percent are high skilled, 54 percent are middle skilled. But only 44 percent of the countryís workers are trained in those middle skills, a 10 percent gap.
Oregonís skills gap is better than the national average, only four percent. But some states have a much greater gap. For example, Alabama, 13 percent, and New Jersey, 15 percent."
Some of us can remember when our high schools had 'shop', home ec, mechanics, industrial arts, etc. I guess it's time to bring back the good old days and start training our kiddos to be welders, carpenters, electricians and plumbers.
Thanks from skews13, roastpork and Athena
Clara007 is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 07:23 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Clara007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Arizona
Posts: 7,261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clara007 View Post
How Oregon is investing in the next generation of blue collar workers | PBS NewsHour

Our nation has been extremely concerned with "JOBS" and our unemployment rate. This article speaks to the need for blue collar skills, vocational education and/or retraining those who want to get back into the job market where these blue collar skills are desperately needed.
Here's an excerpt: "Last summer, two-thirds of Oregon employers reported to the Oregon employment department difficulty filling job vacancies, saying they werenít receiving enough applicants or too many applicants lacked the necessary skills. This mismatch is nationwide. The National Skills Coalition, a Washington, D.C. group that advocates for worker training, says while 15 percent of U.S. jobs are low skilled, and 31 percent are high skilled, 54 percent are middle skilled. But only 44 percent of the countryís workers are trained in those middle skills, a 10 percent gap.
Oregonís skills gap is better than the national average, only four percent. But some states have a much greater gap. For example, Alabama, 13 percent, and New Jersey, 15 percent."
Some of us can remember when our high schools had 'shop', home ec, mechanics, industrial arts, etc. I guess it's time to bring back the good old days and start training our kiddos to be welders, carpenters, electricians and plumbers.

Let me add this. This same scenario came up on a recent 60 Minutes show when Tim Cook (Apple CEO) explained WHY so many of the Apple tech jobs were going to China. Our American workers did not have the skills to build computer components.
Thanks from roastpork
Clara007 is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 08:05 AM   #3
RNG
Senior Member
 
RNG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: LA LA Land North
Posts: 26,275
I have ranted about the overuse amounting to abuse of universities and colleges and an underutilization of tech schools. In the current economic environment, journyman tradesmen (if that is the recognized label you use) command as high and often higher salaries than college educated people, even those working in their fields.

And we need people with those skills.

For some reason, college or university became THE goal. A big mistake.
RNG is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 08:18 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
imaginethat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Posts: 55,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by RNG View Post
I have ranted about the overuse amounting to abuse of universities and colleges and an underutilization of tech schools. In the current economic environment, journyman tradesmen (if that is the recognized label you use) command as high and often higher salaries than college educated people, even those working in their fields.

And we need people with those skills.

For some reason, college or university became THE goal. A big mistake.
Dude, college is like four years of partying with like mom and dad picking up the tab.

I've been in and out of the building trades for most of my life. The overall level of competency displayed by younger people has gone down steadily. I think a big part of it comes from a basic lack of the ability to visualize, and a generational multiplier effect.

My dad repacked our car's wheel bearings. He painted his house. He demonstrated "the trades" to me, and got me interested in them.

One day, I'm 10 or 11, he came home from work and I had disassembled the lawnmower, everything I could take apart. I sat there in the middle of a bunch of parts.

He says, can you put that back together. I said yeah, and the wheel bearings need grease. He said good, and walked inside. I put it back together.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't see dads doing this now. Everyone takes things to specialists, only the specialists are nothing special....
Thanks from Camelot, Sabcat and Clara007
imaginethat is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 08:41 AM   #5
Talent on loan from god
 
Camelot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 25,051
Hell, I can't remember the last time I saw a kid cutting a lawn.
Thanks from imaginethat
Camelot is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 08:51 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
roastpork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 8,376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camelot View Post
Hell, I can't remember the last time I saw a kid cutting a lawn.
When I was a kid living in Park Ridge, IL., (Hillary's home town), we lived on a corner lot and I had to use a push mower, no motor, to cut the fu#@ing lawn.
roastpork is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 08:54 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
imaginethat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Posts: 55,507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camelot View Post
Hell, I can't remember the last time I saw a kid cutting a lawn.
That's a good example. Mowing a lawn is physical, demands physical skills and effort, and is something you want to do as quickly as possible.

Pretty much just the opposite skill set from the one needed to play video games.
Thanks from Athena
imaginethat is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 09:02 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
skews13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: nirvana
Posts: 8,417
Quote:
Originally Posted by RNG View Post
I have ranted about the overuse amounting to abuse of universities and colleges and an underutilization of tech schools. In the current economic environment, journyman tradesmen (if that is the recognized label you use) command as high and often higher salaries than college educated people, even those working in their fields.

And we need people with those skills.

For some reason, college or university became THE goal. A big mistake.
Yep. My brother, who is also an electrician is knocking down high 6 figures in the Dakotas. The companies out that way are competing for them on the job boards. Wait until oil drilling picks back up again that slowed after oil prices fell. You can pretty much write your own salary, and pick the jobs you want to work on.

I personally don't know any electricians, plumbers, welders, pipe fitters, gas fitters, or HVAC techs that are out of work.

My nephew who graduated with a Bachelors from Virginia Tech, was out of work for two years, and is now working with my brother as an apprentice. He's knocking down $1800 a week. He told me over the holidays he felt like he wasted four years of his life. He talks to friends of his he went to college with that are working in restaraunt jobs back home.
Thanks from Athena
skews13 is offline  
Old January 4th, 2016, 09:34 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
BubbaJones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 6,220
The problem is two fold.

Many high schools have eliminated their vocational programs. Those that still have them make the mistake of sending their "at risk" and "marginal learning" students into those programs. There is this mindset from the 1970s where if a kid wasn't real bright, you sent him to the trades.

Carpentry and plumbing really haven't changed much but the tools used are much more high tech. The codes and regulations have evolved as well. Don't even get me started on automotive systems. Todays cars have multiple computers and networks that all interact with each other. The same is true to a lesser degree in the HVAC world. Bottom line, some kid with a 90 IQ CAN NOT fix these things. Yet most councilors and school administrators still persist in pawning off the marginal students to the trades.

Part of my job is to provide training on new automotive technology to the trade school instructors. I had one guy that finally got his local councilors on board. He simply asked them if they wanted kid A working on THEIR new car ???? He finally got them to understand these marginal learners could NOT do the work. They cannot handle the electronics involved. The advisors finally started sending him decent students.

Years ago most trade schools were separate entities from the jr college and university systems. The administrators in these schools had a fair understanding of the types of students they needed to recruit and educate. They worked with their local industries.

Unfortunately (I saw this first hand) many trade schools have now been absorbed into the a single two year school systems and many of the administrators don't have the understanding of the needs of the trades. They tend to steer better students into a path that leads to a four year degree rather than the trades.

I've been in automotive for nearly 40 years now. NEVER unemployed except by my own choice. I'll never be rich, but I'm far from poor.
Thanks from skews13, Sabcat and Athena
BubbaJones is offline  
Reply

  Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Education

Tags
blue, collar, investing, oregon, skills



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
House Bill Would Make It Harder To Prosecute White-Collar Crime LongWinded Current Events 17 November 17th, 2015 07:13 AM
Billionaires Outspend Blue Collar Citizens 16:1 to Strip Civil Rights Libertine Current Events 19 November 7th, 2014 10:03 AM
Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Tennessee Warns of Sticker Shock excalibur Current Events 56 May 24th, 2013 12:12 AM
Terrorism Scare A Boon For White-Collar Crime intangible child Crime and Punishment 0 October 20th, 2008 07:18 AM


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed



Copyright © 2005-2013 Defending The Truth. All rights reserved.