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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:26 AM   #11
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:34 AM   #12
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I am a born again devout Christian. My faith is a private issue, and I don't agree that religion, any religion, should be taught in school.
All we can do is live by example, shine a light for others to follow. Forcing anyone into something is never the answer.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:36 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Nwolfe35 View Post
History? As I already said you donít use the Bible to teach history because itís historically inaccurate? Besides, what history is it teaching? The book ends almost 1,500 years before America is ever discovered.

How is it teaching language? The original writings are in languages no longer used. To teach english we have far better books to do that.

Culture? Which culture? The Bible concerns itself with one tribe from the Middle East. Western European culture was influenced by the religion the Bible is the holy text of but you donít need to study the Bible to understand the influence.
The history in the Bible is the history our founders studied and it effected their decisions. Even in those cases where you say it is in inaccurate it is part of the world view of those who believed it.

Culture? Everywhere you go in the US you are not far from a church. US culture.

Language? There are over 1000 idioms used in American English derived from the Bible. Even those that have fallen into disuse still exist in our heritage of literature.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:38 AM   #14
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I am a born again devout Christian. My faith is a private issue, and I don't agree that religion, any religion, should be taught in school.
All we can do is live by example, shine a light for others to follow. Forcing anyone into something is never the answer.
This thread is not about teaching Christianity, itís about being honest about history, culture, and language.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:57 AM   #15
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What if there was one book that influenced history, language and culture more than any other?

What if that book was not included in any curriculum of public education?

Wouldnít that be stupid?

....wait, .... oh yeah, that is the way it is.
The Bible? Sure, pick one:

"Versions and translations
"Further information: Bible translations and List of Bible translations by language

"The original texts of the Tanakh were mainly in Hebrew, with some portions in Aramaic. In addition to the authoritative Masoretic Text, Jews still refer to the Septuagint, the translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, and the Targum Onkelos, an Aramaic version of the Bible. There are several different ancient versions of the Tanakh in Hebrew, mostly differing by spelling, and the traditional Jewish version is based on the version known as Aleppo Codex. Even in this version there are words which are traditionally read differently from written, because the oral tradition is considered more fundamental than the written one, and presumably mistakes had been made in copying the text over the generations.[citation needed]

"The primary biblical text for early Christians was the Septuagint. In addition, they translated the Hebrew Bible into several other languages. Translations were made into Syriac, Coptic, Ethiopic, and Latin, among other languages. The Latin translations were historically the most important for the Church in the West, while the Greek-speaking East continued to use the Septuagint translations of the Old Testament and had no need to translate the New Testament.

"The earliest Latin translation was the Old Latin text, or Vetus Latina, which, from internal evidence, seems to have been made by several authors over a period of time. It was based on the Septuagint, and thus included books not in the Hebrew Bible.

"According to the Latin Decretum Gelasianum (also known as the Gelasian Decree), thought to be of a 6th-century document[92][93] of uncertain authorship and of pseudepigraphal papal authority (variously ascribed to Pope Gelasius I, Pope Damasus I, or Pope Hormisdas)[94][95][96] but reflecting the views of the Roman Church by that period,[97] the Council of Rome in 382 AD under Pope Damasus I (366Ė383) assembled a list of books of the Bible. Damasus commissioned Saint Jerome to produce a reliable and consistent text by translating the original Greek and Hebrew texts into Latin. This translation became known as the Latin Vulgate Bible, in the fourth century AD (although Jerome expressed in his prologues to most deuterocanonical books that they were non-canonical).[98][99] In 1546, at the Council of Trent, Jerome's Vulgate translation was declared by the Roman Catholic Church to be the only authentic and official Bible in the Latin Church.

"Since the Protestant Reformation, Bible translations for many languages have been made. The Bible continues to be translated to new languages, largely by Christian organizations such as Wycliffe Bible Translators, New Tribes Mission and Bible societies."

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible#...d_translations

(My emphasis - more detail @ the URL)

So - Step right up, step right up!
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 09:58 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by webguy4 View Post
This thread is not about teaching Christianity, itís about being honest about history, culture, and language.
We have books to teach those subjects.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 10:05 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by hoosier88 View Post
The Bible? Sure, pick one:

"Versions and translations
"Further information: Bible translations and List of Bible translations by language

"The original texts of the Tanakh were mainly in Hebrew, with some portions in Aramaic. In addition to the authoritative Masoretic Text, Jews still refer to the Septuagint, the translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, and the Targum Onkelos, an Aramaic version of the Bible. There are several different ancient versions of the Tanakh in Hebrew, mostly differing by spelling, and the traditional Jewish version is based on the version known as Aleppo Codex. Even in this version there are words which are traditionally read differently from written, because the oral tradition is considered more fundamental than the written one, and presumably mistakes had been made in copying the text over the generations.[citation needed]

"The primary biblical text for early Christians was the Septuagint. In addition, they translated the Hebrew Bible into several other languages. Translations were made into Syriac, Coptic, Ethiopic, and Latin, among other languages. The Latin translations were historically the most important for the Church in the West, while the Greek-speaking East continued to use the Septuagint translations of the Old Testament and had no need to translate the New Testament.

"The earliest Latin translation was the Old Latin text, or Vetus Latina, which, from internal evidence, seems to have been made by several authors over a period of time. It was based on the Septuagint, and thus included books not in the Hebrew Bible.

"According to the Latin Decretum Gelasianum (also known as the Gelasian Decree), thought to be of a 6th-century document[92][93] of uncertain authorship and of pseudepigraphal papal authority (variously ascribed to Pope Gelasius I, Pope Damasus I, or Pope Hormisdas)[94][95][96] but reflecting the views of the Roman Church by that period,[97] the Council of Rome in 382 AD under Pope Damasus I (366Ė383) assembled a list of books of the Bible. Damasus commissioned Saint Jerome to produce a reliable and consistent text by translating the original Greek and Hebrew texts into Latin. This translation became known as the Latin Vulgate Bible, in the fourth century AD (although Jerome expressed in his prologues to most deuterocanonical books that they were non-canonical).[98][99] In 1546, at the Council of Trent, Jerome's Vulgate translation was declared by the Roman Catholic Church to be the only authentic and official Bible in the Latin Church.

"Since the Protestant Reformation, Bible translations for many languages have been made. The Bible continues to be translated to new languages, largely by Christian organizations such as Wycliffe Bible Translators, New Tribes Mission and Bible societies."

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bible#...d_translations

(My emphasis - more detail @ the URL)

So - Step right up, step right up!
Now youíre talking. Kids should learn this stuff.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 10:15 AM   #18
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Hobson's choice?

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Originally Posted by webguy4 View Post
...

In the long run every book contains errors.

...
Until quite recently, the various Christian Bibles weren't books @ all - they were collections of scrolls. & they weren't read, they were sung - or perhaps chanted is the right word.

There is an enormous amount of history & theology, blood & suffering behind the various Bibles, quite beyond their content.
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 10:19 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nwolfe35 View Post
(Assuming you are talking about the Bible)

What if that book contained numerous historical and scientific errors?

What if the main purpose of that book was to teach an unproven (And unprovable) theology?

What would the purpose be of introducing such a book into a school curriculum?

We can teach the impact of the Christian religion on Western Civilization (and we do) without introducing its Holy Text.
https://carm.org/manuscript-evidence
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Old January 23rd, 2018, 10:20 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by urbrother View Post
is theory fact? yes or no works
Scientific Theory?

Yes, a scientific theory is established enough to be taught as fact in school.
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