Political Forums  

Go Back   Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Environment

Environment Environmental Politics Forum - Environmental issues, global warming, pollution, and proposals


Thanks Tree12Thanks
  • 4 Post By imaginethat
  • 2 Post By RNG
  • 1 Post By BubbaJones
  • 1 Post By imaginethat
  • 2 Post By Clara007
  • 1 Post By right to left
  • 1 Post By Libertine
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 1st, 2017, 05:21 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
imaginethat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Posts: 53,682
Why You Need More Dirt in Your Life

Basically, our immune systems are getting soft and flabby.
Why You Need More Dirt in Your Life
Soil helps build up our defenses against disease and imparts a sense of the sacred—and we are killing it.


It’s estimated that children now spend less time outside than the average prisoner. This could have devastating effects: Kids need to be exposed to the microbes in the soil to build up their defenses against diseases that may attack them later. But it’s not just children, Paul Bogard explains in his new book, The Ground Beneath Us. The EPA estimates that the average American adult now spends 93 percent of their life indoors. As we retreat indoors, more and more of the earth is disappearing, with an estimated quarter of a million acres paved or repaved in the United States each year.

When National Geographic caught up with Bogard by phone at his home in Minnesota, the author explained why Iowa is the most transformed state in the U.S., how soil is alive but we’re killing it, and how places where terrible things happened can become sacred ground.

You write, “We are only just now beginning to understand the vast life in the soil, what it does, and how our activities on the surface may affect it.” Talk us through some highlights of the new science—and how you became so passionate about dirt.

It began with this statistic: that those of us in the Western world now spend about 90-95 percent of our time inside, in our houses, work places, in our cars. We’re living our lives separated from the natural world. When we walk outside, many of us walk on pavement. There’s this literal separation from the natural ground, from the soil, the dirt. It made me think, what are the costs of this separation? And it struck me as symbolic of our separation of these many different kinds of grounds that sustain us. Our food, water, energy, even our spirits come from these different grounds.

One of the first scientific discoveries I found was the hypothesis that human beings need to be exposed to the biota in the dirt, in the ground, especially when they’re kids, as a way of inoculating us to diseases that appear later in life. Kids these days are not being exposed to dirt because they’re not allowed to play outside. Their parents think dirt is dirty. But both the newest science and the oldest traditions tell us the same thing, which is that the ground is alive. The ground gives us life. And in the book I tried to touch on both of those things.
More: Why You Need More Dirt in Your Life
Thanks from foundit66, Sabcat, Jimgorn and 1 others
imaginethat is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 05:26 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Twisted Sister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brown Township, Ohio
Posts: 9,866
Everyone eats a peck of dirt before they die and I ate more than my fair share.
Twisted Sister is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 08:58 AM   #3
RNG
Senior Member
 
RNG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: LA LA Land North
Posts: 24,685
I have seem several MSM reports of studies that show that babies born into families with pets have fewer allergies and less asthma.

And as a kid growing up on the farm, a reality of life was that we played in cow and chicken shit all the time in that they were endemic to our play areas.

Another anecdotal story. I worked the rigs in northern Alberta quite a bit. And living and eating at some of those work camps in those days left a lot to be desired. Refrigeration was at a premium and so condiments were left on the mess tables for weeks on end.

And I can't think of the number of times someone around me would react negatively to some picnic potato salad or whatever and it just didn't bother me. I had developed tolerances to a wide variety of bad bugs from repeated mild exposures.
Thanks from Twisted Sister and Jimgorn
RNG is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 09:17 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
BubbaJones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 5,765
Some years ago I had an acquaintance who was going through a divorce. One of her soon to be exe's parting shots was to turn off all the utilities even though his three children were still living in the house with their mother. She was able to get water and gas turned back on, but lacked the security deposit to get power turned on. They went without power for almost 3 months. Luckily starting in early spring.

Her kids had always had allergies and asthma. After nearly three months of nothing but fresh air to breath, all three of them had stopped needing their meds.

I've also seen a couple of reports that state people are keeping their houses TOO clean. All the anti-bacterial soaps and cleaners do actually work. They work too well and kids growing up in these houses do so without developing full immune systems.

I for one open the windows every chance I get. I love fresh air in the house.
Thanks from Sabcat
BubbaJones is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 03:17 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
imaginethat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Western Slope, Colorado
Posts: 53,682
Dealing with pathogens and allergens is like lifting weights for the immune system.
Thanks from Sabcat
imaginethat is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 04:31 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Clara007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,963
It's a miracle that any of us baby boomers are still living. Think about our childhood: Mothers drank and smoked during pregnancy. Smoking was allowed in clinics and hospitals. Kids played outside all day, called in for supper and back outside until bed time. Drank from the garden hose. No car seats. Lead paint. Rode our bikes all over without adult supervision or helmets. WE drank sugary drinks and ate white bread with bologna and mayo--left out for hours. Went sledding without supervision. We were spanked with fly swatters, wooden spoons or bare hands and no one called the police. WE fell out of trees and off our bikes.
If we got in trouble at school we got in MORE trouble at home and were made to apologize for being sassypants.

Aaahhh... the good ol' days.
Thanks from imaginethat and Sabcat
Clara007 is offline  
Old May 1st, 2017, 05:54 PM   #7
Celebrating diversity
 
Sabcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Earth
Posts: 20,483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clara007 View Post
It's a miracle that any of us baby boomers are still living. Think about our childhood: Mothers drank and smoked during pregnancy. Smoking was allowed in clinics and hospitals. Kids played outside all day, called in for supper and back outside until bed time. Drank from the garden hose. No car seats. Lead paint. Rode our bikes all over without adult supervision or helmets. WE drank sugary drinks and ate white bread with bologna and mayo--left out for hours. Went sledding without supervision. We were spanked with fly swatters, wooden spoons or bare hands and no one called the police. WE fell out of trees and off our bikes.
If we got in trouble at school we got in MORE trouble at home and were made to apologize for being sassypants.

Aaahhh... the good ol' days.


Now kids have to have and extra class before reading Tom Sawyer to prepare them for the triggering language and nigger Jim.

College law classes have had to shelter their snowflakes from the triggering language. It may be almost impossible to find attorneys to prosecute or defend crimes such as rape.
Sabcat is offline  
Old May 2nd, 2017, 01:21 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Twisted Sister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brown Township, Ohio
Posts: 9,866
Quote:
Originally Posted by RNG View Post
I have seem several MSM reports of studies that show that babies born into families with pets have fewer allergies and less asthma.

And as a kid growing up on the farm, a reality of life was that we played in cow and chicken shit all the time in that they were endemic to our play areas.

Another anecdotal story. I worked the rigs in northern Alberta quite a bit. And living and eating at some of those work camps in those days left a lot to be desired. Refrigeration was at a premium and so condiments were left on the mess tables for weeks on end.

And I can't think of the number of times someone around me would react negatively to some picnic potato salad or whatever and it just didn't bother me. I had developed tolerances to a wide variety of bad bugs from repeated mild exposures.
Some people have a delicate palate including me. The famous and renown floating restaurant on the other side of Hong Kong Island is a popular tourist stop. I wanted to eat there and took a taxi to it. Not very far away I saw an open air market and went and looked at it first. I saw bushel baskets filled up with what looked like small pepper corns. I looked at that wondering what that is when a local came up talking Chinese. The seller waved his hand over the big basket and the black color were thousands of flies that flew up and underneath was white rice. The seller scooped out and weighed the rice and the flies landed again. Then I went and looked at the unrefrigerated meat section and walked out of the open air market and never ate at the famous floating restaurant.
Twisted Sister is offline  
Old May 4th, 2017, 10:51 AM   #9
forgot my old user name
 
right to left's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by imaginethat View Post
Basically, our immune systems are getting soft and flabby.
Why You Need More Dirt in Your Life
Soil helps build up our defenses against disease and imparts a sense of the sacred—and we are killing it.


It’s estimated that children now spend less time outside than the average prisoner. This could have devastating effects: Kids need to be exposed to the microbes in the soil to build up their defenses against diseases that may attack them later. But it’s not just children, Paul Bogard explains in his new book, The Ground Beneath Us. The EPA estimates that the average American adult now spends 93 percent of their life indoors. As we retreat indoors, more and more of the earth is disappearing, with an estimated quarter of a million acres paved or repaved in the United States each year.

When National Geographic caught up with Bogard by phone at his home in Minnesota, the author explained why Iowa is the most transformed state in the U.S., how soil is alive but we’re killing it, and how places where terrible things happened can become sacred ground.

You write, “We are only just now beginning to understand the vast life in the soil, what it does, and how our activities on the surface may affect it.” Talk us through some highlights of the new science—and how you became so passionate about dirt.

It began with this statistic: that those of us in the Western world now spend about 90-95 percent of our time inside, in our houses, work places, in our cars. We’re living our lives separated from the natural world. When we walk outside, many of us walk on pavement. There’s this literal separation from the natural ground, from the soil, the dirt. It made me think, what are the costs of this separation? And it struck me as symbolic of our separation of these many different kinds of grounds that sustain us. Our food, water, energy, even our spirits come from these different grounds.

One of the first scientific discoveries I found was the hypothesis that human beings need to be exposed to the biota in the dirt, in the ground, especially when they’re kids, as a way of inoculating us to diseases that appear later in life. Kids these days are not being exposed to dirt because they’re not allowed to play outside. Their parents think dirt is dirty. But both the newest science and the oldest traditions tell us the same thing, which is that the ground is alive. The ground gives us life. And in the book I tried to touch on both of those things.
More: Why You Need More Dirt in Your Life
Topsoil is so essential..and one of the things being destroyed by today's expanding cities and industrial agriculture, that erodes and doesn't build new soil. It's a big factor in growing calamity facing this world, yet so ignored, this piece from 9 years ago is the most recent yet comprehensive look at the topsoil erosion crisis facing the world:

The lowdown on topsoil: It's disappearing
Disappearing dirt rivals global warming as an environmental threat
The lowdown on topsoil: It's disappearing - seattlepi.com

The National Academy of Sciences has determined that cropland in the U.S. is being eroded at least 10 times faster than the time it takes for lost soil to be replaced.

The United Nations has warned of worldwide soil degradation -- especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where soil loss has contributed to the rapidly increasing number of malnourished people.

Healthy topsoil is a biological matrix, a housing complex for an incredibly diverse community of organisms -- billions of beneficial microbes per handful, nitrogen-fixing fungi, nutrients and earthworms whose digestive tracts transform the fine grains of sterile rock and plant detritus into the fertile excrement that gave rise to the word itself ("drit," in Old Norse).

As such, true living topsoil cannot be made overnight, Montgomery emphasized. Topsoil grows back at a rate of an inch or two over hundreds of years. Very slowly.

"Globally, it's pretty clear we're running out of dirt," Montgomery said.

Ron Myhrum, state soil scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's office in Spokane, agreed that global soil loss is a huge problem. But Myhrum said erosion rates in the Northwest region have improved recently because of better conservation farming practices, including federal payments to farmers to leave some natural ground cover in highly erodible areas.

"We don't have the kind of dust storms here we used to have," Myhrum said. "What's more alarming to me than erosion is conversion of farmland to urban use."
Thanks from imaginethat
right to left is offline  
Old May 4th, 2017, 01:13 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Katmandu
Posts: 4,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by RNG View Post
I have seem several MSM reports of studies that show that babies born into families with pets have fewer allergies and less asthma.

And as a kid growing up on the farm, a reality of life was that we played in cow and chicken shit all the time in that they were endemic to our play areas.

Another anecdotal story. I worked the rigs in northern Alberta quite a bit. And living and eating at some of those work camps in those days left a lot to be desired. Refrigeration was at a premium and so condiments were left on the mess tables for weeks on end.

And I can't think of the number of times someone around me would react negatively to some picnic potato salad or whatever and it just didn't bother me. I had developed tolerances to a wide variety of bad bugs from repeated mild exposures.
I get my water from a spring. I credit the crayfish and cave cricket turds for helping my children be allergy free and hardy.
Thanks from imaginethat
Libertine is offline  
Reply

  Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Environment

Tags
dirt, life



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Russians may have serious dirt on the liar Trump. GhostRider Americas 91 January 16th, 2017 12:44 AM
More dirt on the Trumpster GhostRider Americas 2 July 18th, 2016 06:35 PM
Mother Dirt excalibur Current Events 7 September 6th, 2015 08:32 AM
Did Gloria Allred dig up dirt on Meg Whitman? highway80west Americas 34 November 10th, 2010 06:25 AM
More dirt-digging by the Dems Tirya Politicians 4 September 25th, 2008 12:50 PM


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed



Copyright © 2005-2013 Defending The Truth. All rights reserved.