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Old May 24th, 2017, 09:19 PM   #61
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Tsunami! A large mass of rock is set to slide into the sea on one of the Canary Islands and the giant rock slide and resulting Tsunami is pointed at the US. A Tsunami moves at the speed of a passenger jet and where can people in Southern Florida evacuate to?
Yeah, one day in the future that giant rock slide on that island in the east Atlantic is very likely to occur, based on a documentary I've seen. And I think the whole east coast of the US is at risk.

But there is also evidently calving off of the sea floor off of the eastern seaboard along the coast of the Carolinas that occurs on occasion, of which are thought to have caused tsunamis in the Atlantic in the distant past. Essentially, those events are pieces of the North American continent's edge quite literally falling onto the deeper ocean abyssal plain.

And now that I think about it, I'm kinda relieved to live around 700 hundred feet above sea level these days...
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Old May 24th, 2017, 09:28 PM   #62
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The super rich mansions shown in the pic are on the intracoastal waterway and have a barrier island separating them from the Atlantic Ocean. The intracoastal waterway can be dammed delaying them from getting swamped on the Sun Coast of South Florida. The Gulf of Mexico side of South Florida is called the Gold Coast.
I believe the government in the Miami region is already looking at places like Venice and the Netherlands for ideas about how to hold back the ocean.

And I guess if the residents of that region want to stay there long term, they are probably going to have to cough up a lot of dough, so to speak, to do just that.
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Old May 24th, 2017, 11:16 PM   #63
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I believe the government in the Miami region is already looking at places like Venice and the Netherlands for ideas about how to hold back the ocean.

And I guess if the residents of that region want to stay there long term, they are probably going to have to cough up a lot of dough, so to speak, to do just that.
Well no, since the Netherlands was built below sea level and Miami is above sea level.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 03:12 AM   #64
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There is no panic to sell houses on the coast in Florida at all. Not from the uber rich and not from the moderately well off. Nothing. There is no panic because it is BS. They all know it but they like to play politics. It is exactly like when the Hollywood elites vowed to move out of the country if Trump was elected. They didn't. Why? Because that was BS too.
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High Ground Is Becoming Hot Property as Sea Level Rises

Climate change may now be a part of the gentrification story in Miami real estate

By Erika Bolstad, ClimateWire on May 1, 2017


MIAMI — One of the first sea-level rise maps Broadway Harewood saw was a few years back, when climate activists gathered in his neighborhood to talk about how global warming would affect people in less-affluent South Florida communities.

Harewood had a realization, one that he illustrates with his hands. One hand represents the city of Miami Beach. The opposite hand, moving like the incoming tide, demonstrates how the seas will eventually rise, potentially bringing the coastline of South Florida closer to Miami's historically black neighborhoods — properties like his investments in Liberty City that sit on comparatively higher ground.

"Oh, Miami Beach is going under, the sea level is coming up," Harewood said. "So now the rich people have to find a place to live. My property is 15 feet above sea level, theirs is what? Three under?

"So OK," he said, taking on the voice of a rich developer, "let's knock down the projects, and we move in and push them out."

If there's anything more complicated than the global forces of thermal expansion, ice sheet melt and ocean circulation that contribute to worldwide sea-level rise, it might be the forces of real estate speculation and the race-based historical housing patterns that color present-day gentrification in Miami.

One of the great ironies of those historic housing patterns in Miami is that for decades under Jim Crow, laws and zoning restricted black people to parts of the urban core, an older part of the community that sits on relatively higher ground along a limestone ridge that runs like a topographic stripe down the eastern coast of South Florida. Now, many of those neighborhoods, formerly redlined by lenders and in some places bound in by a literal color wall, have an amenity not yet in the real estate listings: They're on higher ground and are less likely to flood as seas rise.

Whether it's climate change or an eye for good real estate returns, historically black communities on higher ground are increasingly in the sights of speculators and investors. Real estate investment may no longer be just about the next hot neighborhood, it may also now be about the next dry neighborhood.

"It's hideously complicated, like everything else," said Hugh Gladwin, an anthropologist at Florida International University in Miami whose specialty is using geographic information system mapping to understand large, diverse urban settings. He's beginning to see evidence that suggests climate change is now a part of the gentrification story in Miami real estate.

"The real issue is: Are people making real estate decisions based on climate change futures, rather than sort of normal speculation?" Gladwin said.

...

Continued here:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...a-level-rises/
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Old May 29th, 2017, 05:16 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by baloney_detector View Post
No its not. Your article says nothing at all about it. Its a nothingburger.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 06:41 AM   #66
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No its not. Your article says nothing at all about it. Its a nothingburger.
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Old May 31st, 2017, 03:14 PM   #67
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No its not. Your article says nothing at all about it. Its a nothingburger.
Apparently, you didn't actually read or comprehend the article.

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Old May 31st, 2017, 03:27 PM   #68
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Rosie O'Donnell has a house in Miami Beach. Right on the water just inches away from being submerged. Is she trying to fool some sucker into buying this once multi million dollar home for next to nothing?
Rosie should stay in her Miami home. She has nothing to worry about since her body mass will displace any rise in sea level.
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Old May 31st, 2017, 03:31 PM   #69
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Well no, since the Netherlands was built below sea level .
What a silly thing to - build below sea level
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Old May 31st, 2017, 04:29 PM   #70
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What a silly thing to - build below sea level
The Dutch were pushed there by more warring Germanic tribes. The Dutch (like deutsch) move to the "hollow" land or low lands to known as Holland. The swamps they were pushed into was very undesirable and so they were no longer threatened there. They made the best of it.
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