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Old September 13th, 2017, 07:04 AM   #71
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https://youtu.be/6n6afpnIS4g
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Old September 13th, 2017, 12:20 PM   #72
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Two idiots in a Youtube vid. What amazing expertize.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 12:26 PM   #73
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Irma most powerful hurricane ever?

Bald faced lie.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 12:28 PM   #74
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Irma most powerful hurricane ever?

Bald faced lie.
When it was out in the Atlantic it was. What really saved Florida is that it lost a lot of strength going over Cuba. Cuba saves your ass again.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 12:35 PM   #75
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When it was out in the Atlantic it was. What really saved Florida is that it lost a lot of strength going over Cuba. Cuba saves your ass again.
Nope
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Old September 13th, 2017, 12:52 PM   #76
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When it was out in the Atlantic it was. What really saved Florida is that it lost a lot of strength going over Cuba. Cuba saves your ass again.

Technically she was the most powerful hurricane in the north Atlantic. Not however the most powerful storm ever. Storms tend to get even stronger when they wonder into the Gulf of Mexico. The water there was around 85 degrees right now which tends to feed the storms.

You are correct though, Cuba scraped off a bit of Irma's strength then she made the turn north and hit land so didn't really have time to restrengthen. Luckily she also wasn't a huge rain maker.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 03:31 PM   #77
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I just read your post time and time again and....
....you still can't quite comprehend it......as must be quite common for you.

Meanwhile, as you dither and flounder in your own ignorance, major storms ARE getting stronger....and I just love the way you denier cult wackos would try to deny that fact by saying: "there've been no hurricanes making landfall in the USA for 12 years". Hard to say that now, huh? Of course claiming there was a "hurricane drought" involved moronically ignoring the fact that the USA only covers about 2% of the surface of the Earth, and super storms were not at all absent for the last decade on the rest of the Earth.

Here's just a few examples of the Catagory 4 and 5 storms elsewhere, courtesy of Wikipedia.....

Typhoon Meranti, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Ferdie, was one of the most intense tropical cyclones on record. Impacting the Batanes in the Philippines, Taiwan, as well as Fujian, China in September 2016, Meranti formed as a tropical depression on September 8 near the island of Guam. It became a super typhoon early on September 12, as it passed through the Luzon Strait, ultimately reaching its peak intensity on September 13 with 1-minute sustained winds of 315 km/h (195 mph). Shortly afterwards, it passed directly over the island of Itbayat. Meranti passed to the south of Taiwan as a super typhoon, and began weakening steadily as a result of land interaction. By September 15, it struck China as a Category 2-equivalent typhoon, becoming the strongest typhoon on record to impact Fujian Province. In total, Meranti caused 30 deaths and approximately US$2.6 billion in damage.

***

Hurricane Patricia was, at the time, the second-most intense tropical cyclone on record worldwide, behind Typhoon Tip in 1979, with a minimum atmospheric pressure of 872 mbar (hPa; 25.75 inHg).[1] Originating from a sprawling disturbance near the Gulf of Tehuantepec, south of Mexico, in mid-October 2015, Patricia was first classified a tropical depression on October 20. Initial development was slow, with only modest strengthening within the first day of its classification. The system later became a tropical storm and was named Patricia, the twenty-fourth named storm of the annual hurricane season. Exceptionally favorable environmental conditions fueled explosive intensification on October 22. A well-defined eye developed within an intense central dense overcast and Patricia grew from a tropical storm to a Category 5 hurricane in just 24 hours—a near-record pace. On October 23, the hurricane achieved its record peak intensity with maximum sustained winds of 215 mph (345 km/h).[nb 1][nb 2] This made it the most intense tropical cyclone on record in the Western Hemisphere, and the strongest globally in terms of 1-minute maximum sustained winds. Late on October 23, Patricia made landfall near Cuixmala, Jalisco, with winds of 150 mph (240 km/h). This made it the strongest landfalling hurricane on record along the Pacific coast of Mexico. Hundreds of thousands of people were directly affected by the storm, mostly in Guatemala. At least six fatalities were attributed to the event: four in El Salvador, one in Guatemala, and one in Nicaragua. Torrential rains extended into southeastern Mexico, with areas of Quintana Roo and Veracruz reporting accumulations in excess of 19.7 in (500 mm). Damage in Chetumal reached 1.4 billion pesos (US$84.1 million). As a tropical cyclone, Patricia's effects in Mexico were tremendous. Violent winds tore roofs from structures and stripped coastal areas of their vegetation. Preliminary assessments indicated hundreds of homes to be destroyed; seven fatalities were linked to the hurricane directly or indirectly, including one during evacuations. Total damage was estimated to be in excess of 5.4 billion pesos (US$323.3 million), with agriculture and infrastructure comprising the majority of losses. Flooding partially associated with remnant moisture from Patricia inflicted US$52.5 million in damage across Southern Texas.

***

Typhoon Koppu, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Lando, was a powerful and devastating tropical cyclone that struck Luzon in October 2015. It was the twenty-fourth named storm and the fifteenth typhoon of the annual typhoon season. Similar to Goni earlier in the year, Koppu originated from a tropical disturbance east of the Mariana Islands on October 10. Moving briskly west, the system consolidated into a tropical depression the following day and further into a tropical storm on October 13. Situated over the warm waters of the Philippine Sea, Koppu quickly deepened. The storm reached its peak intensity on October 17 with ten-minute sustained winds of 185 km/h (115 mph) according to the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center assessed Koppu to have been a Category 4-equivalent super typhoon with one-minute sustained winds of 240 km/h (150 mph). The storm caused tremendous structural damage in coastal provinces, with thousands of structures damaged or destroyed. Prolonged, heavy rains—peaking at 1,077.8 mm (42.43 in) in Baguio—exacerbated the storm's effects and resulted in widespread flooding. At least 58 people were killed across the country and more than 100,000 others were displaced. Preliminary damage totals, primarily from agriculture, amount to 11 billion pesos (US$235.8 million).

***

Typhoon Rammasun, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Glenda, was one of only three Category 5 super typhoons on record in the South China Sea, with the others being Pamela in 1954 and Meranti in 2016. Rammasun had destructive impacts across the Philippines, South China, and Vietnam in July 2014. It was the seventh tropical cyclone of the season to be named by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA). Rammasun is a Siamese word for thunder god.[1] After Lingling and Kajiki earlier in 2014, Rammasun became the third tropical cyclone, and first typhoon to directly impact the Philippines in 2014. The storm formed on July 9, 2014 and dissipated on July 20th after affecting the Caroline Islands, the Mariana Islands, the Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Macau, and Vietnam. It had 1-minute sustained wind speeds of 260 km/h (160 mph) and caused 196 fatalities and total damages of $7.13 billion (2014 USD).

***

Typhoon Haiyan, known as Super Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, was one of the most intense tropical cyclones on record. On making landfall, Haiyan devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines.[1] It is the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record,[2] killing at least 6,300 people in that country alone.[3] In terms of JTWC-estimated 1-minute sustained winds, Haiyan is the strongest landfalling tropical cyclone on record. In January 2014, bodies were still being found.[4] The thirtieth named storm of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season, Haiyan originated from an area of low pressure several hundred kilometers east-southeast of Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia on November 2, 2013. After becoming a tropical storm and attaining the name Haiyan at 0000 UTC on November 4, the system began a period of rapid intensification that brought it to typhoon intensity by 1800 UTC on November 5. By November 6, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) assessed the system as a Category 5-equivalent super typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale; the storm passed over the island of Kayangel in Palau shortly after attaining this strength. Thereafter, it continued to intensify; at 1200 UTC on November 7, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) upgraded the storm's maximum ten-minute sustained winds to 230 km/h (145 mph), the highest in relation to the cyclone. The Hong Kong Observatory put the storm's maximum ten-minute sustained winds at 285 km/h (180 mph)[5] prior to landfall in the central Philippines, while the China Meteorological Administration estimated the maximum two-minute sustained winds at the time to be around 78 m/s (280 km/h or 175 mph). At the same time, the JTWC estimated the system's one-minute sustained winds to 315 km/h (195 mph), unofficially making Haiyan the strongest tropical cyclone ever observed based on wind speed, a record which would then be surpassed by Hurricane Patricia in 2015 at 345 km/h (215 mph).[6] Haiyan is also tied with Typhoon Meranti in 2016 as the strongest tropical cyclone in the Eastern Hemisphere by wind speed; several others have recorded lower central pressure readings. At 20:04 UTC on November 7, the eye of the cyclone made its first landfall in the Philippines at Guiuan, Eastern Samar. Gradually weakening, the storm made five additional landfalls in the country before emerging over the South China Sea. Turning northwestward, the typhoon eventually struck northern Vietnam as a severe tropical storm on November 10. Haiyan was last noted as a tropical depression by the JMA the following day. The cyclone caused catastrophic destruction in the Visayas, particularly on Samar and Leyte. According to UN officials, about 11 million people were affected – many were left homeless.[7] Total fatalities came to 6,329 confirmed dead and 1,074 missing. The damages amounted to $2.86 billion (2013 USD).

***

Typhoon Bopha, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Pablo, was the strongest tropical cyclone to ever hit the southern Philippine island of Mindanao, making landfall as a Category 5 super typhoon with winds of 175 mph (280 km/h).[1] Bopha originated unusually close to the equator, becoming the second-most southerly Category 5 super typhoon, reaching a minimum latitude of 7.4°N on December 3, 2012. After first hitting Palau, where it destroyed houses, disrupted communications and caused power outages, flooding and uprooted trees, Bopha made landfall late on December 3 on Mindanao, an island that had been devastated by the much weaker Tropical Storm Washi in December 2011.[2][3] The storm caused widespread destruction on Mindanao, leaving thousands of people homeless and more than 600 fatalities.[4] The highest observed wind speeds were 10-minute sustained: 185 km/h (115 mph) and 1-minute sustained: 280 km/h (175 mph). The total fatalities came to 1,067 dead and 834 missing, while the damages amounted to $1.04 billion (USD).

***

Typhoon Megi, known in the Philippines as Super Typhoon Juan, was one of the most intense tropical cyclones on record with 1-minute sustained speeds of 295 km/h (185 mph). Megi was the only super typhoon in 2010. Early on October 18, Megi made its first landfall over Luzon.[1] By passing Luzon, Megi weakened but gradually regained strength in the South China Sea, before weakening and losing its eyewall in the Taiwan Strait. Megi made its second landfall over Zhangpu in Fujian, China on October 23.[2] Megi killed 31 people and caused $255.1 million (2010 USD) in damage over Luzon, making it one of the costliest typhoons in the Philippines.[3] After moving to the South China Sea, the outflow of Megi and a weather front together brought torrential rainfall, caused $42.2 million (2010 USD) in damage and killed 38 people in Yilan, Taiwan, making Megi the deadliest typhoon of 2010 in Taiwan.[4] Megi also caused $411.7 million (2010 USD) in damage over Fujian, China.[5]. Total fatalities were 69 dead and 4 missing. Damages amounted to over $709 million (2010 USD).
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Old September 13th, 2017, 05:03 PM   #78
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Technically she was the most powerful hurricane in the north Atlantic. Not however the most powerful storm ever. Storms tend to get even stronger when they wonder into the Gulf of Mexico. The water there was around 85 degrees right now which tends to feed the storms.

You are correct though, Cuba scraped off a bit of Irma's strength then she made the turn north and hit land so didn't really have time to restrengthen. Luckily she also wasn't a huge rain maker.
6 Hurricanes to make US landfall before it in the past were stronger. So you ridiculous Lefties see this as a sign that Hurricanes are stronger now. Silly. Nobody with a brain is fooled by this goofy idea. Especially in light of the fact that 9 years ago we were told by great minds in global warming science, that we would see greater frequency of hurricane occurrences and greater intensity. What we got instead was no hurricanes touching land in the US.

You Lefties are brainwashed. You are dying to spend a trillion dollars on nothing.
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Old September 13th, 2017, 05:13 PM   #79
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The Ipcc own data shows no increase in storm energy

Hurricanes, Rainfall, and Climate Change - Just Facts
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Old September 13th, 2017, 05:36 PM   #80
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The Ipcc own data shows no increase in storm energy

Hurricanes, Rainfall, and Climate Change - Just Facts
Another member of the fundie menace chiming in. Why don't you read some results from real scientists for a change?
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