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Old March 27th, 2018, 07:07 PM   #1
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The End of Winter

Written by a man who lives a little north of Fairbanks, AK. A short excerpt:
Alaska’s record-low temperature (set on my birthday, January 23rd, in 1971) was eighty below zero. One night during the omega block, the National Weather Service predicted that this mark would be surpassed. Although that didn’t happen, the thermometer at my cabin registered seventy-eight below. A couple of nights later, the barometric pressure at Northway (near Alaska’s border with the Yukon) was 31.85 inches of mercury—the highest reading ever recorded in North America. At temperatures like these, one false move can be costly. When a neighbor, back in the woods beyond me, couldn’t get his propane stove to work, he brought the tank inside his cabin to warm it up. The tank exploded. Badly burned, my neighbor dragged himself through the night almost two miles out to the road. I still remember the drops of frozen blood all along the trail.

...A decade later, on New Year’s Eve, in 1999, my wife (that former girlfriend) and I hosted a bonfire at our house, in the hills north of Fairbanks. As the twenty-first century dawned in Alaska, our thermometer read fifty-seven degrees below zero. We and our friends revelled in it. But the following winter the temperature in Fairbanks never reached forty below. This was a first, in the brief recorded history of local weather. However, it would quickly become the new normal. High-temperature records began to be set with regularity, in both summer and winter. I remember the first time that we saw lightning and heard thunder in December, which was followed by a heavy freezing rain. It had always been that the roads around town were better in winter, when a hard crust of dry, compacted snow filled in all the potholes and offered plenty of traction. Now we had frequent freezing and thawing, and treacherous glazes of thick black ice.
The End of Winter
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Old March 27th, 2018, 07:13 PM   #2
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I will get this out of the way for them.....FAKE NEWS.......LOL
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Old March 27th, 2018, 07:32 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imaginethat View Post
Written by a man who lives a little north of Fairbanks, AK. A short excerpt:
Alaska’s record-low temperature (set on my birthday, January 23rd, in 1971) was eighty below zero. One night during the omega block, the National Weather Service predicted that this mark would be surpassed. Although that didn’t happen, the thermometer at my cabin registered seventy-eight below. A couple of nights later, the barometric pressure at Northway (near Alaska’s border with the Yukon) was 31.85 inches of mercury—the highest reading ever recorded in North America. At temperatures like these, one false move can be costly. When a neighbor, back in the woods beyond me, couldn’t get his propane stove to work, he brought the tank inside his cabin to warm it up. The tank exploded. Badly burned, my neighbor dragged himself through the night almost two miles out to the road. I still remember the drops of frozen blood all along the trail.

...A decade later, on New Year’s Eve, in 1999, my wife (that former girlfriend) and I hosted a bonfire at our house, in the hills north of Fairbanks. As the twenty-first century dawned in Alaska, our thermometer read fifty-seven degrees below zero. We and our friends revelled in it. But the following winter the temperature in Fairbanks never reached forty below. This was a first, in the brief recorded history of local weather. However, it would quickly become the new normal. High-temperature records began to be set with regularity, in both summer and winter. I remember the first time that we saw lightning and heard thunder in December, which was followed by a heavy freezing rain. It had always been that the roads around town were better in winter, when a hard crust of dry, compacted snow filled in all the potholes and offered plenty of traction. Now we had frequent freezing and thawing, and treacherous glazes of thick black ice.
The End of Winter
Such weather would be considered a frozen hell by me.
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Old March 28th, 2018, 03:05 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imaginethat View Post
Written by a man who lives a little north of Fairbanks, AK. A short excerpt:
Alaska’s record-low temperature (set on my birthday, January 23rd, in 1971) was eighty below zero. One night during the omega block, the National Weather Service predicted that this mark would be surpassed. Although that didn’t happen, the thermometer at my cabin registered seventy-eight below. A couple of nights later, the barometric pressure at Northway (near Alaska’s border with the Yukon) was 31.85 inches of mercury—the highest reading ever recorded in North America. At temperatures like these, one false move can be costly. When a neighbor, back in the woods beyond me, couldn’t get his propane stove to work, he brought the tank inside his cabin to warm it up. The tank exploded. Badly burned, my neighbor dragged himself through the night almost two miles out to the road. I still remember the drops of frozen blood all along the trail.

...A decade later, on New Year’s Eve, in 1999, my wife (that former girlfriend) and I hosted a bonfire at our house, in the hills north of Fairbanks. As the twenty-first century dawned in Alaska, our thermometer read fifty-seven degrees below zero. We and our friends revelled in it. But the following winter the temperature in Fairbanks never reached forty below. This was a first, in the brief recorded history of local weather. However, it would quickly become the new normal. High-temperature records began to be set with regularity, in both summer and winter. I remember the first time that we saw lightning and heard thunder in December, which was followed by a heavy freezing rain. It had always been that the roads around town were better in winter, when a hard crust of dry, compacted snow filled in all the potholes and offered plenty of traction. Now we had frequent freezing and thawing, and treacherous glazes of thick black ice.
The End of Winter
I am one man too. Its freezing ass cold here in Chicago for spring. So what?
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Old March 28th, 2018, 04:18 AM   #5
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It will be 80 degrees in the Phoenix area today, but our winter (Jan, Feb) was really weird--much cooler than usual. The citrus trees usually bloom first week in March and they are just beginning to bloom now.
This is an unusual pattern for AZ.

In other news: Joe Arpaio says he's still convinced Obama is not a U.S. citizen by birth and he promises to continue his quest for TRUTH, JUSTICE, and the American Way. So, to relate that to weather/climate? Hell hath not frozen over in Maricopa County. LOL
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