Political Forums
Forum Notice

Go Back   Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Civil Rights > Gay and Lesbian Rights

Gay and Lesbian Rights Gay and Lesbian Political Rights Forum - For topics and discussions about LGBT


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 1st, 2012, 07:57 AM   #1
Retired
 
highway80west's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 16,769
http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs...-abc-news.html



As her elderly mother was dying, Barbara Johnson lay next to her on the hospital bed, reciting the "Hail Mary." Loetta Johnson, 85, had been a devout Catholic, raising her four children in the church and sending them to Catholic schools.



At her mother's funeral mass at the St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Md., a grieving Barbara Johnson was the first in line to receive communion.



What happened next stunned her. The priest refused Johnson, who is gay, the sacramental bread and wine.



"He covered the bowl with the Eucharist with his hand and looked at me, and said I cannot give you communion because you live with a woman and that is a sin in the eyes of the church," Johnson told ABC News affiliate WJLA.



Her older brother, Larry Johnson, couldn't believe what he had seen.



"I walked to the side of the church to console her, because she was clearly distraught," Johnson told ABC News.



Larry Johnson said his sister, who has been in a committed gay relationship for 19 years, composed herself enough to give her mother's eulogy, but then he was shocked at what happened next. The priest left the altar, Johnson said, and didn't return until his sister was nearly finished speaking.



Family members added that the priest failed to come to the grave site, and the burial was attended by a substitute priest found by the funeral director.



Larry Johnson and his sister were outraged at what occurred on "what would already have been the worst day of my life," he said.



They want the priest, the Rev. Marcel Guarnizo, removed from dealings with parishioners. They also believe he owes them an apology.



"This isn't about gay rights and it isn't about Catholic bashing, it is simply about the conduct of a reprehensible priest," said Johnson.



But the head of DignityUSA, a group that focuses on gay and lesbian rights and the Catholic Church, sees the incident as part of a wider problem.



"The reality is, in some ways, it is very emblematic of the hierarchy's approach to gay people, transgender people," said Marianne Duddy-Burke. "There are little messages of rejection that happen all the time."



Guarnizo did not return an email asking for a comment about the incident.



The Archdiocese of Washington had no public comment about the priest's behavior, but issued a statement that indicated Guarnizo should have taken up the matter of whether Johnson could receive communion in private.



"When questions arise about whether or not an individual should present themselves for communion," the statement said, "it is not the policy of the Archdiocese to Washington to publicly reprimand the person."



The archdiocese said it is looking into the incident and that it would handle it as a personnel issue.



Duddy-Burke of DignityUSA believes the response misses the point.



"I would hope that it provides a wake-up call to church leaders to make them see where the extremes of their policy are leading," she said. "My concern is they will just see this as an isolated incident and fail to see the context."



Both Larry and Barbara Johnson have received letters from the archdiocese of Washington apologizing "that what should have been a celebration of your mother's life was overshadowed by a lack of pastoral sensitivity."



Larry Johnson appreciated the letters and the sentiment behind them.



But in his letter to the archdiocese, Johnson noted that the Church's teachings in relation to personal behavior are complex issues. And he wondered if the priest has any right to determine who is able to receive communion "without any discussion, insight or spiritual awareness" of the person presenting themselves before him.
highway80west is offline  
Remove Ads
Old March 1st, 2012, 07:58 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by H80W
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nwolfe35' timestamp='1330575683' post='386602

As everyone knows who reads my posts, I am a HUGE supporter of gay rights.





Now, having said that, there was another story in this article where the gay people are completely out of line.



Quote:

The Washington Post reports that a woman attending her mother's funeral at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was denied communion when the Rev. Marcel Guarzino told Barbara Johnson that she and her partner were living in sin. Guarzino then walked out on Johnson's eulogy and did not attend burial services. While Johnson has received a formal letter of apology from another member of the church, she said she is still insisting that Guarzino be removed from the parish.


She was in a Catholic Church, they have every right to withhold any sacrament from any person for any reason. She should have not attempted to participate...or if she did and was told she could not, just accept it. It is THEIR religion and she has no business telling them what they must (or must not) do.


While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.


In fact the gay woman would have been given communion had her mother's funeral been held at her Catholic church rather than her mother's. Lot's of Catholic churches are gay-friendly, but you're right that Episcopals today are much more so.



The RCC is also far out of step with its membership on gay rights and homosexuality - between their benighted views on this issue and their broad conspiracy to cover up pedophilia, it's no wonder the RCC is losing members (as well as losing money - both throough reduced collections and through bleeding money out through lawsuits).
skrekk is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 07:58 AM   #3
Retired
 
highway80west's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 16,769
While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.
highway80west is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:01 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Up in the hills hidin' out
Posts: 1,872
Communion is a serious sacrament in many sects of Christianity and less serious in other sects of Christianity. That's why there are different reactions.



My opinion is that is has more to do with "social pressures" and less to do with the scriptural doctrine in "lenient" church sects.
Tony Perkins is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:10 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
It's interesting that homophobic Christians like Tony focus on the communion issue when the real transgressions were far more serious - walking out on the eulogy, and failing to show up to provide the graveside services. Those are a far bigger affront to the entire family of the deceased, rather than just the denial of communion to the one daughter.



No wonder the diocese immediately apologized. I wouldn't be surprised if the priest gets transferred (that's the way the RCC usually sweeps problems under the rug).



And note, the gay daughter is Catholic and normally attends a gay-friendly Catholic church. Too bad they couldn't have held the funeral there.
skrekk is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:15 AM   #6
Retired
 
highway80west's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 16,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
It's interesting that homophobic Christians like Tony focus on the communion issue when the real transgressions were far more serious - walking out on the eulogy, and failing to show up to provide the graveside services. Those are a far bigger affront to the entire family of the deceased, rather than just the denial of communion to the one daughter.



No wonder the diocese immediately apologized. I wouldn't be surprised if the priest gets transferred.



And note, the gay daughter is Catholic and normally attends a gay-friendly Catholic church. Too bad they couldn't have held the funeral there.


I guess it was the mom's wish that the service was held at her church instead of being held at her daughter's church. But if that was not the case, the priest should have consulted with the family a day or two before the service was held about communion. The family could have well taken the funeral service to Ms. Anderson's church instead.



Like I said earlier, my church was contacted and we quickly arranged for the service to be held in the Nave. Too bad for the RCC. Sometimes people learn their lessons the hard way.
highway80west is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:17 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
knowuryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by H80W' timestamp='1330620429' post='386747

[quote name='Nwolfe35' timestamp='1330575683' post='386602']

As everyone knows who reads my posts, I am a HUGE supporter of gay rights.





Now, having said that, there was another story in this article where the gay people are completely out of line.



Quote:

The Washington Post reports that a woman attending her mother's funeral at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was denied communion when the Rev. Marcel Guarzino told Barbara Johnson that she and her partner were living in sin. Guarzino then walked out on Johnson's eulogy and did not attend burial services. While Johnson has received a formal letter of apology from another member of the church, she said she is still insisting that Guarzino be removed from the parish.


She was in a Catholic Church, they have every right to withhold any sacrament from any person for any reason. She should have not attempted to participate...or if she did and was told she could not, just accept it. It is THEIR religion and she has no business telling them what they must (or must not) do.


While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.


In fact the gay woman would have been given communion had her mother's funeral been held at her Catholic church rather than her mother's. Lot's of Catholic churches are gay-friendly, but you're right that Episcopals today are much more so.



The RCC is also far out of step with its membership on gay rights and homosexuality - between their benighted views on this issue and their broad conspiracy to cover up pedophilia, it's no wonder the RCC is losing members (as well as losing money - both throough reduced collections and through bleeding money out through lawsuits).

[/quote]



I read a similar story some years ago about a Catholic Church refusing to hold a funeral for a gay man who died of AIDS, and yet they previously had held a funeral for a mob boss.



As far as I am concerned, the archaic and antiquated Catholic Church can do what they like, but let's face it, how many divorcees, or adulterers or mobsters or people who have had abortions or straight people who engage in sodomy are freely given access to all aspects of The Catholic Church.



They are free to be hypocritical bigots, and we are free to call them on it.
knowuryder is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:18 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
I wonder what other types of "sinners" this priest regularly denies communion to? Anyone who's been divorced or remarried, or who has ever masturbated?

From the Catechism of Church Citations:



Quote:
2352: By masturbation is to be understood the deliberate stimulation of the genital organs in order to derive sexual pleasure. "Both the Magisterium of the Church, in the course of a constant tradition, and the moral sense of the faithful have been in no doubt and have firmly maintained that masturbation is an intrinsically and gravely disordered action." "The deliberate use of the sexual faculty, for whatever reason, outside of marriage is essentially contrary to its purpose." For here sexual pleasure is sought outside of "the sexual relationship which is demanded by the moral order and in which the total meaning of mutual self-giving and human procreation in the context of true love is achieved."



2396: Among the sins gravely contrary to chastity are masturbation, fornication, pornography, and homosexual practices.


So the question is how many parishioners who masturbate have been denied communion by this bigoted priest?
skrekk is offline  
Old March 1st, 2012, 08:23 AM   #9
Retired
 
highway80west's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 16,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by knowuryder View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk' timestamp='1330621124' post='386751

[quote name='H80W' timestamp='1330620429' post='386747']

[quote name='Nwolfe35' timestamp='1330575683' post='386602']

As everyone knows who reads my posts, I am a HUGE supporter of gay rights.





Now, having said that, there was another story in this article where the gay people are completely out of line.



Quote:

The Washington Post reports that a woman attending her mother's funeral at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was denied communion when the Rev. Marcel Guarzino told Barbara Johnson that she and her partner were living in sin. Guarzino then walked out on Johnson's eulogy and did not attend burial services. While Johnson has received a formal letter of apology from another member of the church, she said she is still insisting that Guarzino be removed from the parish.


She was in a Catholic Church, they have every right to withhold any sacrament from any person for any reason. She should have not attempted to participate...or if she did and was told she could not, just accept it. It is THEIR religion and she has no business telling them what they must (or must not) do.


While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.


In fact the gay woman would have been given communion had her mother's funeral been held at her Catholic church rather than her mother's. Lot's of Catholic churches are gay-friendly, but you're right that Episcopals today are much more so.



The RCC is also far out of step with its membership on gay rights and homosexuality - between their benighted views on this issue and their broad conspiracy to cover up pedophilia, it's no wonder the RCC is losing members (as well as losing money - both throough reduced collections and through bleeding money out through lawsuits).

[/quote]



I read a similar story some years ago about a Catholic Church refusing to hold a funeral for a gay man who died of AIDS, and yet they previously had held a funeral for a mob boss.



As far as I am concerned, the archaic and antiquated Catholic Church can do what they like, but let's face it, how many divorcees, or adulterers or mobsters or people who have had abortions or straight people who engage in sodomy are freely given access to all aspects of The Catholic Church.



They are free to be hypocritical bigots, and we are free to call them on it.

[/quote]



I saw a movie starring Sylvester Stallone and Sharon Stone recently. The mob boss, played by a balding Rod Steiger, praised God by protecting him. Saying things like "you are a good God". What he didn't know was that he was holding a small explosive device. When he realized what he was holding which explode in his face, taking his life, did he call God "bastardo".



Yeah, are these mob bosses truly religious while sanctioning killings of their enemies?
highway80west is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 07:39 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
mytmouse57's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,036
This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.



However, I can also see this being used to drive a wider, essentially fallacious argument. That being -- "Because a priest was, probably unjustly, rude to a lesbian, the Church needs to abandon its traditions and openly embrace, affirm, celebrate and encourage open homosexuality."
mytmouse57 is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 07:42 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Up in the hills hidin' out
Posts: 1,872
Quote:
Originally Posted by knowuryder View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk' timestamp='1330621124' post='386751

[quote name='H80W' timestamp='1330620429' post='386747']

[quote name='Nwolfe35' timestamp='1330575683' post='386602']

As everyone knows who reads my posts, I am a HUGE supporter of gay rights.





Now, having said that, there was another story in this article where the gay people are completely out of line.



Quote:

The Washington Post reports that a woman attending her mother's funeral at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was denied communion when the Rev. Marcel Guarzino told Barbara Johnson that she and her partner were living in sin. Guarzino then walked out on Johnson's eulogy and did not attend burial services. While Johnson has received a formal letter of apology from another member of the church, she said she is still insisting that Guarzino be removed from the parish.


She was in a Catholic Church, they have every right to withhold any sacrament from any person for any reason. She should have not attempted to participate...or if she did and was told she could not, just accept it. It is THEIR religion and she has no business telling them what they must (or must not) do.


While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.


In fact the gay woman would have been given communion had her mother's funeral been held at her Catholic church rather than her mother's. Lot's of Catholic churches are gay-friendly, but you're right that Episcopals today are much more so.



The RCC is also far out of step with its membership on gay rights and homosexuality - between their benighted views on this issue and their broad conspiracy to cover up pedophilia, it's no wonder the RCC is losing members (as well as losing money - both throough reduced collections and through bleeding money out through lawsuits).

[/quote]



I read a similar story some years ago about a Catholic Church refusing to hold a funeral for a gay man who died of AIDS, and yet they previously had held a funeral for a mob boss.



As far as I am concerned, the archaic and antiquated Catholic Church can do what they like, but let's face it, how many divorcees, or adulterers or mobsters or people who have had abortions or straight people who engage in sodomy are freely given access to all aspects of The Catholic Church.



They are free to be hypocritical bigots, and we are free to call them on it.

[/quote]



I agree. The Minnesota Vikings will not let me kick the footbal, the hypocritical bigots.
Tony Perkins is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 07:48 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytmouse57 View Post
This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.
skrekk is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 08:00 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Up in the hills hidin' out
Posts: 1,872
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


All those in favor of tyranny raise their hands. You can raise both of yours.
Tony Perkins is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 08:33 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Perkins View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk' timestamp='1330706904' post='387051

[quote name='mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049']

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


All those in favor of tyranny raise their hands. You can raise both of yours.

[/quote]



Personally I don't give a shit what a church does within its community, I'm just pointing out that an archbishop sets church policy for his archdiocese and that the priest violated that policy in this case.



That's already earned the priest a rebuke, and might yet get him transferred.
skrekk is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 08:39 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
PaperAlchemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


I was more angry at his walking out than the communion business. Such unprofessional behavior.
PaperAlchemist is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 09:29 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 8,333
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaperAlchemist View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk' timestamp='1330706904' post='387051

[quote name='mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049']

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


I was more angry at his walking out than the communion business. Such unprofessional behavior.

[/quote]



Especially his failure to show up to perform graveside services - that harms the entire family and friends.
skrekk is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 10:49 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Up in the hills hidin' out
Posts: 1,872
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Perkins' timestamp='1330707620' post='387056

[quote name='skrekk' timestamp='1330706904' post='387051']

[quote name='mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049']

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


All those in favor of tyranny raise their hands. You can raise both of yours.

[/quote]



Personally I don't give a shit what a church does within its community, I'm just pointing out that an archbishop sets church policy for his archdiocese and that the priest violated that policy in this case.



That's already earned the priest a rebuke, and might yet get him transferred.

[/quote]



Oh my, another rebel for Jesus.
Tony Perkins is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 11:42 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
knowuryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Perkins View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by knowuryder' timestamp='1330622249' post='386765

[quote name='skrekk' timestamp='1330621124' post='386751']

[quote name='H80W' timestamp='1330620429' post='386747']

[quote name='Nwolfe35' timestamp='1330575683' post='386602']

As everyone knows who reads my posts, I am a HUGE supporter of gay rights.





Now, having said that, there was another story in this article where the gay people are completely out of line.



Quote:

The Washington Post reports that a woman attending her mother's funeral at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Gaithersburg, Maryland, was denied communion when the Rev. Marcel Guarzino told Barbara Johnson that she and her partner were living in sin. Guarzino then walked out on Johnson's eulogy and did not attend burial services. While Johnson has received a formal letter of apology from another member of the church, she said she is still insisting that Guarzino be removed from the parish.


She was in a Catholic Church, they have every right to withhold any sacrament from any person for any reason. She should have not attempted to participate...or if she did and was told she could not, just accept it. It is THEIR religion and she has no business telling them what they must (or must not) do.


While we have some new members here like Tony and Fayt, I should repeat this from my own experience.



When I was a member of another church, some years ago a gay man died. The church he worshipped at, a Catholic Church, refused to host the funeral for him and his family. So they contacted my church and it was done there. The Catholic Church gave in, but it was too late. A day after the funeral, the family of the dead man came and worshipped with us. It was all in the local news.



Now if the woman had the service at an Episcopal church like mine, she most likely would have received communion since we are more tolerant. Somehow I wonder if Pope Benedictus Arnold will be more lenient in the future when it comes to have funerals and memorial services whereby giving communion to gay and lesbians.


In fact the gay woman would have been given communion had her mother's funeral been held at her Catholic church rather than her mother's. Lot's of Catholic churches are gay-friendly, but you're right that Episcopals today are much more so.



The RCC is also far out of step with its membership on gay rights and homosexuality - between their benighted views on this issue and their broad conspiracy to cover up pedophilia, it's no wonder the RCC is losing members (as well as losing money - both throough reduced collections and through bleeding money out through lawsuits).

[/quote]



I read a similar story some years ago about a Catholic Church refusing to hold a funeral for a gay man who died of AIDS, and yet they previously had held a funeral for a mob boss.



As far as I am concerned, the archaic and antiquated Catholic Church can do what they like, but let's face it, how many divorcees, or adulterers or mobsters or people who have had abortions or straight people who engage in sodomy are freely given access to all aspects of The Catholic Church.



They are free to be hypocritical bigots, and we are free to call them on it.

[/quote]



I agree. The Minnesota Vikings will not let me kick the footbal, the hypocritical bigots.

[/quote]



That made even less sense than your other posts.
knowuryder is offline  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 11:58 AM   #19
Retired
 
highway80west's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 16,769
Quote:
Originally Posted by skrekk View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaperAlchemist' timestamp='1330709941' post='387063

[quote name='skrekk' timestamp='1330706904' post='387051']

[quote name='mytmouse57' timestamp='1330706381' post='387049']

This particular priest's actions might have been out of line. Though technically, he was correct, perhaps he should have considered the spirit of doctrine over the exact letter of it.


Wrong - he was technically incorrect since he violated the policy of the Washington archdiocese regarding the non-denial of communion.


I was more angry at his walking out than the communion business. Such unprofessional behavior.

[/quote]



Especially his failure to show up to perform graveside services - that harms the entire family and friends.

[/quote]



I know for a fact that a friend of mine, an Episcopal priest who just retired in Washington, DC, would have performed the services had he been contacted as such. My friend is all for SSM. It would have been no problem at all.
highway80west is offline  
Old March 4th, 2012, 04:36 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Nwolfe35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 7,670
The church is free to conduct their services in any way they see fit as long as they are not harming someone else by doing so. (So no human sacrafice!)



If you don't like how the church conducts it's affairs then don't be a Catholic.



If you don't like people marrying someone of the same sex, then don't marry someone of the same sex.



It works both ways.
Nwolfe35 is online now  
Reply

  Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Issues > Civil Rights > Gay and Lesbian Rights

Tags
communion, denied, funeral, lesbian, mother's, woman


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Boy Scouts Removed Mother From Troop After Discovering She Is A Lesbian PaperAlchemist Gay and Lesbian Rights 50 September 8th, 2011 10:22 PM
Patrick Kennedy says he's been barred from Communion CNN Current Events 10 November 24th, 2009 10:58 AM
SC priest: No communion for Obama supporters intangible child Religion 47 November 21st, 2008 12:33 PM


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed



Copyright © 2005-2013 Defending The Truth. All rights reserved.