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Old March 7th, 2015, 02:50 PM   #71
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Here in Oz...I'd venture to say "it's the food". We have a huge export food industry so quality is of a high standard...and seafood is ubiquitous fare. Land is readily available to anyone...and back yard garden produce is pretty normal.
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Old March 7th, 2015, 10:10 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by Jimmyb View Post
Your chart is raw data and does not account for the heterogeneity of the US’s lifestyles and behaviors that are not under the control of medicine compared to other countries regarding life expectancy: Auto accident deaths, smoking related disease deaths, obesity related disease and death. Regarding most all cancers and diseases, the US has superior outcomes over other countries, and especially countries with socialized medicine.
can you read twerp1
"The researchers suggest that the relatively low life expectancies in the US cannot be explained by the size of the nation, racial diversity, or economics," says the document, which ranks the US 38th in the world for life expectancy overall.

"Instead, the authors point to high rates of obesity, tobacco use and other preventable risk factors for an early death as the leading drivers of the gap between the US and other nations."

Continue reading the main story
Risk factors

smoking
obesity
high blood pressure
high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol
high dietary trans fatty acids
high salt intake
low dietary omega 3 fatty acids
high blood glucose
low intake of fruits and vegetables
alcohol abuse
physical inactivity
Source: University of Washington

"We weren't surprised that we had lower life expectancies than other countries, but we were surprised by the fact that we were falling further behind," says Dr Ali Mokdad, professor of global health at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

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Last edited by seamanstaines; March 7th, 2015 at 10:31 PM.
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Old March 7th, 2015, 10:19 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
What the figure comes from is WHO.. I posted this earlier in this thread.

THE ONLY REASON THAT US HAS SHORTER LIFE SPANS

is because we are have more freedom to take risks..

ONCE AGAIN if you take out cases were people DIE IN ACCIDENTS (example car crashes to experimental ultra light crashes, the "Hey Watch this" factor"

you see these are no indication of healthcare system.

Where BREAST CANCER survival and other diseases are indicaitons of the quality of healthcare.
drivel, U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health - Institute of Medicine

The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world, but it is far from the healthiest. For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages than people in almost all other high-income countries. This health disadvantage prevails even though the U.S. spends far more per person on health care than any other nation. To gain a better understanding of this problem, the NIH asked the National Research Council and the IOM to investigate potential reasons for the U.S. health disadvantage and to assess its larger implications.
No single factor can fully explain the U.S. health disadvantage. It likely has multiple causes and involves some combination of inadequate health care, unhealthy behaviors, adverse economic and social conditions, and environmental factors, as well as public policies and social values that shape those conditions. Without action to reverse current trends, the health of Americans will probably continue to fall behind that of people in other high-income countries. The tragedy is not that the U.S. is losing a contest with other countries, but that Americans are dying and suffering from illness and injury at rates that are demonstrably unnecessary.
Reports of Interest
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Old March 7th, 2015, 10:37 PM   #74
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The US is the only country that uses the full WHO definition of live birth and other countries eliminate several of the criteria. Switzerland uses only two of the four criteria. In Switzerland, the criteria is that an infant must be at least 30 centimeters long to be considered living. This allows other countries to use weight, gestation period, and length to classify a baby as not being born alive, and the US classifies the as born alive. The U.S. uses the data collected by the United Nations Statistics Division on U.S. infant mortality vis-a-vis Italy, which has three different criteria for infant death from three different regions.

The US counts every live birth, which means all premature births. Many countries do not count premature births as live births, and do not count them as live births if they die within a certain period of time. We do more for premature infants than most countries, which skews the numbers.


When factoring in all the criteria, the US has one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the world.

The numbers in your chart are raw numbers devoid of the criteria of the counties regarding what they consider a live birth.
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr63/nvsr63_05.pdf


In the United States and most European countries, no gestational
age or birthweight lower limit is placed on the reporting of live births
or infant deaths, although a few countries do have lower limits for birth
registration or reporting (7,8,10). Some studies have found variations
between countries in the distribution of births and infant deaths at
22–23 weeks of gestation, suggesting the possibility of variations in
reporting at these early gestational ages (11–13). Thus, events at less
than 24 weeks of gestation were excluded from the analysis (except
for Figure 1) to ensure international comparability.
This is not meant to
minimize the importance of these early infant deaths, which contribute
substantially to the United States’ overall infant mortality rate; rather,
the approach recognizes that accurate international comparisons may
not be possible for events at less than 24 weeks of gestation.
The Kitagawa method is a further development of direct standardization
that more precisely quantifies the relative contribution of
changes in variable-specific rates and in population composition to the
total changes in rates in cases where both are changing simultaneously
(14). In this report, the Kitagawa method is used to estimate the percent
contribution of differences in the distribution of births by gestational age,
and in gestational age-specific infant mortality rates to the overall
difference in infant mortality rates between countries. It is also used to
estimate the infant mortality rate that would have occurred, and the
number of infant deaths that could have been averted, had different
conditions been present.
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Old March 7th, 2015, 10:47 PM   #75
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NHS means British healthcare rated top out of 11 western countries, with US coming last - UK - News - The Independent
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Old March 8th, 2015, 04:04 AM   #76
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Are dental plan available, there? They should be!
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Old March 8th, 2015, 04:46 AM   #77
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Then why are you more likely to die in the British Healthcare system than the US system?

You are basing this on life expectancy, which has a massive outlier population, ACCIDENTAL DEATHS (these are not HEALTHCARE RELATED).

People in the US do activities hobbies and actions that create a higher rate of accidental death.

Unfortunately... In the US if you are caught DUI, you don't lose your ability to get a license to drive.. 25,000+ people die each and every year because of that, many die before they access the healthcare system.. they are DOA.

So if I have Cancer and you have the Same Cancer.. I WILL MOST LIKELY SURVIVE because I am in the US healthcare system, and you are in the UK system

If I have Diabetes and you have Diabetes, I WILL MOST LIKELY SURVIVE AND HAVE A BETTER QUALITY of life, Why, Because I am in the US healthcare system and you are in the UK System.

But I am more likely to die because some idiot is driving while stoned or drunk.
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Last edited by TNVolunteer73; March 8th, 2015 at 04:58 AM.
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Old March 8th, 2015, 04:54 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by TNVolunteer73 View Post
Then why are you more likely to die in the British Healthcare system than the US system?

You are basing this on life expectancy, which has a massive outlier population, ACCIDENTAL DEATHS (these are not HEALTHCARE RELATED).

People in the US do activities hobbies and actions that create a higher rate of accidental death.

Unfortunately... if you are caught DUI, you don't lose your ability to get a license to drive.. 25,000+ people die each and every year because of that, many die before they access the healthcare system.. they are DOA.

So if I have Cancer and you have the Same Cancer.. I WILL MOST LIKELY SURVIVE because I am in the US healthcare system, and you are in the UK system

If I have Diabetes and you have Diabetes, I WILL MOST LIKELY SURVIVE AND HAVE A BETTER QUALITY of life, Why, Because I am in the US healthcare system and you are in the UK System.

But I am more likely to die because some idiot is driving while stoned or drunk.
"driving while stoned AND drunk"
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Old March 8th, 2015, 05:11 AM   #79
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Notice how the severely intellectually challenged individuals try to point out minute differences in outcomes, while having no idea of what those numbers mean.
The US has for example the best detection rate for prostate cancer, the best cure rate for Prostate cancer (also the highest death rate from prostate cancer, something they never get to).

What the ignore is the bottom line of the comparison, the UK health care system costs $3400 per person, the US system $8500 per person.
You could pay the annual health care for the average Briton AND the average German, for what the average American costs, and still have money left over.

In a market system, where the differences in product are minute, but the price differences are enormous, what does that imply?
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Old March 8th, 2015, 05:15 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by goober View Post
Notice how the severely intellectually challenged individuals try to point out minute differences in outcomes, while having no idea of what those numbers mean.
The US has for example the best detection rate for prostate cancer, the best cure rate for Prostate cancer (also the highest death rate from prostate cancer, something they never get to).

What the ignore is the bottom line of the comparison, the UK health care system costs $3400 per person, the US system $8500 per person.
You could pay the annual health care for the average Briton AND the average German, for what the average American costs, and still have money left over.

In a market system, where the differences in product are minute, but the price differences are enormous, what does that imply?


Yes, I have noticed that in you, challenged..

Yes we pay more, but we LIVE LONGER. is a better quality of life and a longer life with this better quality, worth a little more money?

Last edited by TNVolunteer73; March 8th, 2015 at 05:23 AM.
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