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Old August 22nd, 2017, 02:21 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by Clara007 View Post
This was so predictable.

Last year marked the fifth consecutive year Santa Barbara County’s agriculture industry has struggled with labor shortages, which have ranged from 15 to 26 percent. Farmers, therefore, must leave crops to rot in the fields. An estimated $13 million of strawberries, broccoli, leafy greens, and other unharvested produce were plowed under last year, up from five years ago when losses amounted to an estimated $4.4 million, according to the region’s Grower-Shipper Association.

Strawberries are just one small piece of the labor shortage. In the last decade, according to the Pew Research Center, more Mexican immigrants have been leaving the United States than have been arriving. As Mexico’s economy improves and becomes less reliant on agriculture, Mexicans are having fewer children and “feeling less the push to migrate north,” said Lucas Zucker of CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy).

Security has also tightened along the southern border. The Obama administration deported about three million undocumented immigrants between 2009 and 2016, according to Pew, many more than the two million the Bush administration deported during the eight years prior.

Labor Shortage Leaves $13 Million in Crops to Rot in Fields

AND there's more:

In the spring of 2011, Georgia’s fruit and vegetable growers faced a crippling drought. But it wasn’t for lack of rain; rather, their supply of farmworkers had dried up almost overnight. Typically, migrant pickers made their way north from Florida’s winter tomato fields into Georgia to harvest its Vidalia onions, bell peppers, and blueberries. But that year, “they just didn’t come,” says Charles Hall, executive director of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association. The pickers avoided the state, leaving “crops in the field rotting.”

What happened? Just after taking office that winter, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed a bill that, he vowed, would “crack down on the influx of illegal immigrants into our state.” Known in civil-liberties circles as Georgia’s racial-profiling law, House Bill 87 encouraged local police officers to check the immigration status of anyone suspected of violating any regulation, including traffic rules, and imposed harsh penalties on anyone caught “harboring an illegal alien.” The governor probably didn’t intend for his signature immigration law to cost his state’s farm sector loads of cash. But his timing couldn’t have been worse.
A shortfall of 11,000 workers—representing about 85 percent of peak employment—caused $75 million in crop losses that spring alone, with a total hit to the state economy of $103.6 million that season, according to a study by the University of Georgia. Neighboring Alabama passed an even more draconian law later that year, spurring its immigrant farmworkers to exit en masse and costing the state up to 6 percent of its gross domestic product.
Now, the entire country is governed by a chief executive who vows to make life miserable for undocumented immigrants. Pursuing what might be called his “bad hombre” theory, President Donald Trump swiftly made good on promises to ramp up deportations after taking office.

Just as in Georgia, the rest of the nation’s farms lean heavily on the very group of people targeted by the president. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, the US harvest requires between 1.5 million and 2.2 million workers annually—and at least half of them are undocumented.

Trump?s Crackdown on Immigration Is Terrible News for Anyone Who Eats Food ? Mother Jones
There is no shortage of illegal aliens in this state. In fact we have an over abundance. In a state that harbors these criminals. Could it be that the illegal alien employers are hiring them in the service area, and construction?
But of course, the answer to the agricultural problem is to allow more illegals in. Which is why Mother Jones is on my...don't bother list.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 02:27 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clara007 View Post
This was so predictable.

Last year marked the fifth consecutive year Santa Barbara County’s agriculture industry has struggled with labor shortages, which have ranged from 15 to 26 percent. Farmers, therefore, must leave crops to rot in the fields. An estimated $13 million of strawberries, broccoli, leafy greens, and other unharvested produce were plowed under last year, up from five years ago when losses amounted to an estimated $4.4 million, according to the region’s Grower-Shipper Association.

Strawberries are just one small piece of the labor shortage. In the last decade, according to the Pew Research Center, more Mexican immigrants have been leaving the United States than have been arriving. As Mexico’s economy improves and becomes less reliant on agriculture, Mexicans are having fewer children and “feeling less the push to migrate north,” said Lucas Zucker of CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy).

Security has also tightened along the southern border. The Obama administration deported about three million undocumented immigrants between 2009 and 2016, according to Pew, many more than the two million the Bush administration deported during the eight years prior.

Labor Shortage Leaves $13 Million in Crops to Rot in Fields

AND there's more:

In the spring of 2011, Georgia’s fruit and vegetable growers faced a crippling drought. But it wasn’t for lack of rain; rather, their supply of farmworkers had dried up almost overnight. Typically, migrant pickers made their way north from Florida’s winter tomato fields into Georgia to harvest its Vidalia onions, bell peppers, and blueberries. But that year, “they just didn’t come,” says Charles Hall, executive director of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association. The pickers avoided the state, leaving “crops in the field rotting.”

What happened? Just after taking office that winter, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed a bill that, he vowed, would “crack down on the influx of illegal immigrants into our state.” Known in civil-liberties circles as Georgia’s racial-profiling law, House Bill 87 encouraged local police officers to check the immigration status of anyone suspected of violating any regulation, including traffic rules, and imposed harsh penalties on anyone caught “harboring an illegal alien.” The governor probably didn’t intend for his signature immigration law to cost his state’s farm sector loads of cash. But his timing couldn’t have been worse.
A shortfall of 11,000 workers—representing about 85 percent of peak employment—caused $75 million in crop losses that spring alone, with a total hit to the state economy of $103.6 million that season, according to a study by the University of Georgia. Neighboring Alabama passed an even more draconian law later that year, spurring its immigrant farmworkers to exit en masse and costing the state up to 6 percent of its gross domestic product.
Now, the entire country is governed by a chief executive who vows to make life miserable for undocumented immigrants. Pursuing what might be called his “bad hombre” theory, President Donald Trump swiftly made good on promises to ramp up deportations after taking office.

Just as in Georgia, the rest of the nation’s farms lean heavily on the very group of people targeted by the president. According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, the US harvest requires between 1.5 million and 2.2 million workers annually—and at least half of them are undocumented.

Trump?s Crackdown on Immigration Is Terrible News for Anyone Who Eats Food ? Mother Jones
Fuck it, get rid of all National Borders and immigration laws.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 02:40 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by BubbaJones View Post
Not to argue, but my point was, it's not just the illegals. The whole program is essentially slave labor as most of the migrant harvesters are EXEMPT from min wage and over time rules. Even if they are here legally they get seriously screwed by the farm industry. Since the farm industry is now mostly corporate run, this is huge corporations taking serious advantage of the poorest people. Of course it will never change since we live in a corporatocrisy and the very companies that benefit from this slave labor are the same people with the most influence over our government.
They're are not just getting screwed in the agricultural field. They are getting screwed in every job field. It's a win-win situation for the illegal alien employer. Cheap labor and the taxpayer is forced to subsidize them. Not to mention a state government that turns a blind eye to the situation and is now protecting them. This is what happens when the rule of law breaks down.

Last edited by caconservative; August 22nd, 2017 at 03:35 PM.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 04:43 PM   #54
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One needs to let the soil renew and the rotting crops make good fertilizer; we don't need another dust bowl!
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 04:51 PM   #55
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As the Baby Boomers continue to retire followed by a smaller generation, we will need considerably more foreign workers. That is a demographic fact.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 04:57 PM   #56
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As the Baby Boomers continue to retire followed by a smaller generation, we will need considerably more foreign workers. That is a demographic fact.
If we didn't have so many abortion mills and women that refuse to bear their children we'd probably have enough workers.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 05:30 PM   #57
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If we didn't have so many abortion mills and women that refuse to bear their children we'd probably have enough workers.
So it's them wimmin's fault. They are supposed to be the human equivalent of puppy mill denizens.

Power to the MCPers.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 05:34 PM   #58
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Georgia's shortage of farm labor in 2011 was a self inflicted wound. The farmers had been paying illegal workers knowing that this was something that they should not have done. When the state actually started enforcing the labor laws making it illegal to hire an illegal. Employers should not be able to hire people who are not in this country illegally. Georgia's pain did show us something else... It showed us that when unable to find employment they would self deport. They fled Georgia like a plague was coming.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 05:55 PM   #59
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Georgia's shortage of farm labor in 2011 was a self inflicted wound. The farmers had been paying illegal workers knowing that this was something that they should not have done. When the state actually started enforcing the labor laws making it illegal to hire an illegal. Employers should not be able to hire people who are not in this country illegally. Georgia's pain did show us something else... It showed us that when unable to find employment they would self deport. They fled Georgia like a plague was coming.
That is the basis of what several posters on this board have been saying long and hard. Much of the government and business are hypocrits about the so called illegal alien problem. Put some enforcement in existing laws and have some teeth in the consequences and the problem will, if not go away, decrease significantly.

I have been a strong supporter of prime contractor laws but am usually shouted down by both the right and the left.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 08:33 PM   #60
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As the Baby Boomers continue to retire followed by a smaller generation, we will need considerably more foreign workers. That is a demographic fact.
I love when you guys say things like this.
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