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View Poll Results: Dogs are Naturally Morally Superior to Human Beings
Agree 5 62.50%
Disagree 2 25.00%
Other 1 12.50%
Voters: 8. You may not vote on this poll

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Old March 28th, 2018, 12:21 PM   #21
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Meet the YouTubeer who has s♤x w/ her dog.


https://youtu.be/uYKtTsqfwJw

Well, not a link to her channel but someone who is examining her channel
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Old March 28th, 2018, 09:31 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by MichaelT View Post
These are all traits which are formed by them being pack animals.
I love dogs and I have a dog at the moment, but we should not attribute human constructs to their behaviour, it's unfair to both them and ourselves.
In case you weren't aware, our human heritage is as pack animals also! Maybe that's why humans and dogs have struck up friendships and partnerships for over 40,000 years!

According to experts on dog behavior, dogs have as rich an emotional life as we do, including 'secondary' emotions:

Do Dogs Feel Jealousy or Envy?

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Primary vs. Secondary Emotions
In all social situations there are inequities, and some individuals come out better than others when it comes to rewards. Scientists tend to separate emotions into two categories: primary and secondary. Primary emotions, such as fear, anger, disgust, joy, and surprise, are considered to be universal. Secondary emotions, such as guilt, shame, jealousy, and envy, are thought to require more complex cognitive processes. For example, in the case of envy, you have to actively pay attention to what the other individual is getting and compare it to what you are getting for your efforts. Although there are observations of clear cases of jealousy and envy in primates, such as chimpanzees and baboons, the argument has been made that it would be unlikely to find it in an animal like the dog because it involves self awareness at a level which, until recently, was doubted in dogs. However, people who live around dogs often observe it in their pets.............................................. ...

Putting the Theory to the Test
Friederike Range, of the University of Vienna, decided to see if dogs do show envy or jealousy in an experimental situation where two dogs perform the same task, but one gets rewarded while the other does not. Both dogs learned the simple trick of shaking hands by extending a paw and putting it in a person’s hand. For the test, the dogs were arranged in pairs, seated beside one another. Both dogs in each pair were individually commanded to “shake hands,” but only one dog received a reward. It was expected that if dogs experience jealousy or envy, the unrewarded dog might respond to this unfair distribution of rewards by refusing to continue to obey the command. That is exactly what happened. The dog that was not getting treats for performing soon stopped doing the task. Furthermore, the dog that was not rewarded showed clear signs of stress or annoyance when his partner got the reward.

Some people might protest that this does not really show envy or jealousy. It might well be the case that the dog who was not being rewarded stopped responding simply due to the fact that all unrewarded behaviors eventually tend to disappear because of the process learning theorists call “extinction.” To make sure that it was the interaction between the dogs that was important, rather than just the frustration of not being rewarded, a similar experiment was conducted where the dogs performed the task without a partner, but also without any rewards for his exertions. Under these circumstances, the dog continued to present its paw for a much longer time and did not show the same signs of frustration and annoyance.

One conclusion that emerged from these studies was that jealousy and envy in dogs are not quite as complex as in human beings. When human beings are involved in competitive social situations, every aspect of the reward is carefully scrutinized to try to determine who is getting the best outcome. Dogs do not view this situation under the same kind of microscope. This can be seen when the experimenters changed the situation in a subtle way: Now, again, we have two dogs sitting in front of the experimenter, each being asked in turn to place their paw in her hand. Both dogs are being rewarded for this activity, but one dog gets a very desirable treat (a piece of chicken), while the other dog gets a less desirable treat (a piece of bread). Unlike what might be seen in humans put in the same circumstance, both dogs continue to work and seem to be quite happy with the situation. This means that dogs are sensitive to fairness (whether everyone is being rewarded for their efforts), but not equity (whether all of the rewards are equal).
Do Dogs Feel Jealousy or Envy? ? American Kennel Club
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Old March 28th, 2018, 10:34 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by right to left View Post
In case you weren't aware, our human heritage is as pack animals also! Maybe that's why humans and dogs have struck up friendships and partnerships for over 40,000 years!

According to experts on dog behavior, dogs have as rich an emotional life as we do, including 'secondary' emotions:

Do Dogs Feel Jealousy or Envy?


Do Dogs Feel Jealousy or Envy? ? American Kennel Club
Of all animals, and in my opinion, humans and dogs have the most similar set of normally experienced emotions. We kinda know where dogs are coming from, and vice versa.

Cats, they've got some "bad" human emotions, along with some good ones, some silky sweet.

Horses truly, truly are different, but they do have some human emotions. Besides dogs, cats, horses, what other common domestic animals have human-like emotions?

Or is the point that because we've spent so much time around dogs, cats, and horses we've come to be like them?
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