Political Forums  

Go Back   Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Forum > Political Ideologies > Progressivism

Progressivism Progressivism Forum - Political Philosophy Forum


Thanks Tree116Thanks
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old May 7th, 2018, 03:22 PM   #181
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: NM
Posts: 1,768
The fire next time

Well, before the next case like this comes up: What exactly can the UK UHS do about these cases - a hopeless prognosis, likely death of the patient. Can the parents or caretakers remove the patient? The last two experiences - this one & Charlie Gard (was it?) seem to indicate that the UHS can enforce its doctors' opinion on the probable outcome of the case. Is that accurate?

Is there an appeal process for the patient or caregivers, if they disagree with the prognosis or the recommended course of treatment? That never seems to be mentioned in these cases - or if so, I missed it. Is any of this process spelled out somewhere so that the patients & caregivers know what to expect if the subject comes up? My impression is that the parents &/or caregivers always seem to be very surprised that the UHS is opposed to intervention in patient care by third parties, no matter where they're from.
Thanks from Twisted Sister
hoosier88 is offline  
Old May 7th, 2018, 03:53 PM   #182
Senior Member
 
Twisted Sister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brown Township, Ohio
Posts: 11,740
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier88 View Post
Well, before the next case like this comes up: What exactly can the UK UHS do about these cases - a hopeless prognosis, likely death of the patient. Can the parents or caretakers remove the patient? The last two experiences - this one & Charlie Gard (was it?) seem to indicate that the UHS can enforce its doctors' opinion on the probable outcome of the case. Is that accurate?

Is there an appeal process for the patient or caregivers, if they disagree with the prognosis or the recommended course of treatment? That never seems to be mentioned in these cases - or if so, I missed it. Is any of this process spelled out somewhere so that the patients & caregivers know what to expect if the subject comes up? My impression is that the parents &/or caregivers always seem to be very surprised that the UHS is opposed to intervention in patient care by third parties, no matter where they're from.
I am not sure of the difference between prognosis and diagnosis not having a medical degree, both words sound similar to me. I think but not sure that prognosis comes first and diagnosis comes second.

edit: The operation was a success but the patient died.

Last edited by Twisted Sister; May 7th, 2018 at 04:19 PM.
Twisted Sister is offline  
Old May 7th, 2018, 05:14 PM   #183
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 10,957
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier88 View Post
Well, before the next case like this comes up: What exactly can the UK UHS do about these cases - a hopeless prognosis, likely death of the patient. Can the parents or caretakers remove the patient? The last two experiences - this one & Charlie Gard (was it?) seem to indicate that the UHS can enforce its doctors' opinion on the probable outcome of the case. Is that accurate?

Is there an appeal process for the patient or caregivers, if they disagree with the prognosis or the recommended course of treatment? That never seems to be mentioned in these cases - or if so, I missed it. Is any of this process spelled out somewhere so that the patients & caregivers know what to expect if the subject comes up? My impression is that the parents &/or caregivers always seem to be very surprised that the UHS is opposed to intervention in patient care by third parties, no matter where they're from.
In the UK, courts tend to defer to the Doctors, in the US, the parents get a little more leeway, but the court will order treatment if superstitious parents try to avoid it.

In this case it was clear that the patient was already brain dead, and would die in a matter of days.
There was no possibility of a different outcome, and so the court protected the patient from misguided wishes of the parents.
Thanks from iolo
goober is offline  
Old May 7th, 2018, 06:42 PM   #184
Put some ice on that
 
Sabcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Earth
Posts: 26,567
Quote:
Originally Posted by goober View Post
In the UK, courts tend to defer to the Doctors, in the US, the parents get a little more leeway, but the court will order treatment if superstitious parents try to avoid it.

In this case it was clear that the patient was already brain dead, and would die in a matter of days.
There was no possibility of a different outcome, and so the court protected the patient from misguided wishes of the parents.
Misguided wishes of life...that is hilarious..
Sabcat is offline  
Old May 8th, 2018, 03:35 AM   #185
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 10,957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabcat View Post
Misguided wishes of life...that is hilarious..
Keep trying pumpkin, the only way to make your argument work, is to ignore reality, something you are pretty good at, but reality is winning, again...
Thanks from iolo
goober is offline  
Reply

  Defending The Truth Political Forum > Political Forum > Political Ideologies > Progressivism

Tags
alfie, baby, dad, death, giving, hospital, mouthtomouth, statemandated



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GOP = Foot in Mouth RNG Current Events 1 October 3rd, 2014 10:19 AM


Facebook Twitter RSS Feed



Copyright © 2005-2013 Defending The Truth. All rights reserved.