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Old July 30th, 2017, 09:08 AM   #1
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Portuguese arrived in America 19 years before Columbus

A museum in Toronto wants to recognize the Portuguese presence and prove that the navigator João Vaz Corte-Real was in Canada in 1473. "History is very complex because there are always several versions of events," stressed the president of the Royal Canadian Portuguese Historical Museum.

The Royal Canadian Portuguese Historical Museum in Toronto, Canada, intends to recognize the Portuguese presence in North America nineteen years before Christopher Columbus's arrival to the continent, the institution announced.

"There was always evidence that the Portuguese navigator João Vaz Corte-Real was in Canada in 1473, 19 years before Christopher Columbus's arrival in North America," said Suzy Soares, president of the Royal Canadian Portuguese History Museum (RCPHM) in English).
Some Canadian historians continue today to have some doubts that the former captain-grantee of Angra (Azores) was where Canada is currently located before 1492, but in Portugal for many scholars "is a given Acquired, "now joining the various points of view and prove that João Vaz Corte-Real" actually went through Canada before Columbus. "

"Everybody knows of the existence of the Dighton Stone, located in Berkley, Massachusetts (United States), and has written words that can only be in Portuguese, but the story is very complex because there are always several versions of events," .

Suzy Soares sets the museum's goal to go looking for more evidence and "recognize the discovery of America" by Portuguese navigator João Vaz Corte-Real.
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Old July 30th, 2017, 02:36 PM   #2
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I don't think Columbus ever actually reached the continent of North America.
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Old July 31st, 2017, 04:12 AM   #3
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I don't think Columbus ever actually reached the continent of North America.

Colombo
Arrived in the center of america, not to the north

island
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Old August 5th, 2017, 06:16 AM   #4
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I don't think Columbus ever actually reached the continent of North America.
No, he neither saw nor set foot on the North American continent.
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Old August 5th, 2017, 06:33 AM   #5
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No, he neither saw nor set foot on the North American continent.
The Spaniards gave small pox to the indians who gave syphilis to the rest of the world. Syphilis was unknown in Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa at the time.
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Old August 5th, 2017, 01:37 PM   #6
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The Spaniards gave small pox to the indians who gave syphilis to the rest of the world. Syphilis was unknown in Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa at the time.
To be specific, the disease was identified as early as the 1490's but was not specifically named until 40 years later. It was simply called the "French Disease". Whether it came to Europe via the Colombian Exchange is unknown, because in pre-Renaissance Europe any form of infectious disease was simply called the pox. So the origins of syphilis remain in dispute.
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Old August 5th, 2017, 01:54 PM   #7
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Back to Columbus; he was--in my humble opinion--the greatest failure in human history. Think about it. He set out with the goal of reaching China, making contact with the Empire of the Great Khan, and retiring in fabulous comfort and wealth. He missed by approximately 12,000 miles, in fact he could not have been any further off without leaving the planet. He failed to realize his mistake, even when other navigators with superior skill attempted to inform him that he had gone the wrong way, and that his math was completely wrong (he estimated that the earth was 16,000 miles in circumference and that there was only 1 ocean--there are actually 4 and the circumference of the globe at the equator is closer to 24,000 miles.) He named an entire race of people after a place and culture which they had never encountered, leaving in his wake a swath of genocide and destruction that in some places reached 90%. He then repeated his blunder 3 more times, never owning up to the reality that he wrong. And in the end, he died penniless and broken, having spent the last years of his life in a Spanish prison. REALLY, could he have done any worse?
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Old August 10th, 2017, 10:01 AM   #8
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Christopher Columbus
Columbus was wrong, so he discovered America, but without knowing it. His achievement, however, had immense historical consequences. The navigator was rewarded for his daring and perseverance, something of the great conquerors. He died without recognition and without being convinced that he had discovered a New World.
Of course there were plenty of people here when he arrived several millennia ago. In addition, archaeological research reveals that the Vikings were on the eastern seaboard of North America, around the beginning of the 11th century. For the Europeans of the 15th century, however, these lands were unknown.
Christopher Columbus was born in 1451, but we do not know where. Traditionally it is said that it was Genoese. However, research shows that he may have been Portuguese. There are even doubts about his real name, for there are no known texts in which he has signed as Columbus (or Columbus).
Christopher had two brothers, who also became navigators. He was the son of the weaver Domenico Colombo and grew up in his hometown. Genoa was a great port at the time. Not much is known about his education, but he has acquired the knowledge necessary to become a good cartographer and excellent navigator.
In 1472, at the age of 21, he commanded one of the Genoese Welshmen, in combat against the kingdom of Aragon, part of present-day Spain. As a young man she has participated in several commercial trips around the Mediterranean.

In 1476, a Genoese commercial squad was attacked and the ship on which Columbus was shipwrecked. Colombo managed to reach the coast of Portugal and stayed there for nine years until 1485. At the time, Portugal was Europe's largest maritime power and developed navigation technologies, seeking to reach the Indies by sea, bypassing Africa.
Bartolomeo Colombo, Cristóvão's brother, lived in Lisbon at that time. The two worked as cartographers and then became traders.
In 1479, Cristóvão married Felipa Moniz, daughter of the late Bartolomeu Moniz Perestrelo, captain of the island of Porto Santo, in the Madeira archipelago. On this island, the couple had their son Diogo. His father-in-law's library was rich in maps and texts on navigations, and he came across ideas of cosmographers, such as Toscanelli, who attributed to Earth a much smaller circumference than the real one.
Colombo matured ideas of arriving in the Indies always sailing to the west, until reaching the kingdom of Cipango (Japan). He presented his project to King John II of Portugal, but the King's advisors knew that there were doubts about the real circumference of the Earth, and they believed that they could soon arrive in the Indies, bypassing Africa .
In 1486, with the Portuguese refusal, Columbus presented his project to the kings of Spain, who also refused. He also presented his project in France and England and everyone refused.

In 1488, the Portuguese demonstrated the possibility of reaching the Indies, by sea, bypassing Africa.
In 1492, Queen Isabel of Spain decided to support the Columbus project, which left on 3 August of that year with three ships: Santa Maria, Niña and Pinta. On October 12, they spotted one of the islands of the Bahamas, then also explored part of Cuba and Haiti. Colombo believed to have arrived in Cipango (Japan) and called its inhabitants Indians.
He returned at the beginning of 1493. He passed through Lisbon and recounted his discoveries. The Portuguese realized that the lands found by Columbus belonged to Portugal, according to the Treaty of Alcáçovas. The Portuguese almost went to war with Spain to defend their rights, until negotiations led the two kingdoms to sign the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494.
In November of 1493, Columbus returned to the lands discovered, exploring other islands of the Caribbean, but without finding the riches that he looked for, nor the towns mentioned by Marco Polo. He founded the town of La Isabela, in the present Dominican Republic.

In 1498, he made his third voyage, when he explored part of the coast of Central America and Venezuela. Upon returning, he was arrested in 1500.
In 1501, the Portuguese sent an exploratory mission to the lands discovered by Cabral, with the participation of Amerigo Vespucci. It was possibly after this trip that some began to suspect that the Indies of Columbus would indeed be other lands. But this process of understanding took a few years. The cartographer Johannes Ruysch, for example, on his map of 1507, recorded that the New World was the Land of Santa Cruz and believed that Japan was in the Antilles.
In 1502, Columbus was able to conduct a fourth voyage and explored part of Honduras and the coast of Panama. He believed he was in Indochina and was looking for a ticket to the Indian Ocean. He returned in 1504, still thinking that he had arrived in the Indies. His prestige, however, was greatly shaken by his failure to bring the promised riches.
He died in 1506, abandoned and unconvinced that the lands discovered were a New Worl
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Old August 10th, 2017, 12:10 PM   #9
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The Vikings arrived in America circa 800 AD and ancient Egyptians arrived earlier than that because the ancient Egyptians grew corn which originated in North America,
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Old August 10th, 2017, 01:40 PM   #10
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The Vikings arrived in America circa 800 AD and ancient Egyptians arrived earlier than that because the ancient Egyptians grew corn which originated in North America,


Yes to Groelândia It's in North America.Denmark vikings stays in europe

Área
- Total 2 166 086 km²
População
- Estimativa para 2015 56 .898 hab

There's more ice than earth.

Egyptians North America have never heard of
Perhaps the Phoenicians???
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