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Old August 22nd, 2017, 04:03 AM   #1
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It was official language in England

Did you know that French was an official language in England for 300 years?

There are several words from French that comes from the English language and vice versa. From the English, the French took, among other terms, "week-end", "parking" and "shampooing". English uses words such as déjà vu, garage, résumé, soufflé, mousse, baguette, buffet, restaurant, chic.

As we see, the influence of French on English is greater than in the opposite direction. This is because French was the official language in England since the Norman victory at the Battle of Hastings (1066) until the late 14th century. Almost 300 years of presence of the French language.

And it was not the only expansion of the French in its history. In addition to taking their language to the countries, mostly African, who colonized throughout the eighteenth and part of the nineteenth century, the language of the nobility in Russia was French. The aristocrats used it because they wanted to strengthen political and cultural relations with European countries, and France was one of the powers in these areas.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 09:34 AM   #2
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Did you know that French was an official language in England for 300 years?

There are several words from French that comes from the English language and vice versa. From the English, the French took, among other terms, "week-end", "parking" and "shampooing". English uses words such as déjà vu, garage, résumé, soufflé, mousse, baguette, buffet, restaurant, chic.

As we see, the influence of French on English is greater than in the opposite direction. This is because French was the official language in England since the Norman victory at the Battle of Hastings (1066) until the late 14th century. Almost 300 years of presence of the French language.

And it was not the only expansion of the French in its history. In addition to taking their language to the countries, mostly African, who colonized throughout the eighteenth and part of the nineteenth century, the language of the nobility in Russia was French. The aristocrats used it because they wanted to strengthen political and cultural relations with European countries, and France was one of the powers in these areas.
Not AN - THE But for the Hundred Years War it would be the official language still, established by a small minority, as English itself was.

Last edited by iolo; August 23rd, 2017 at 09:15 AM.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 12:58 PM   #3
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Vikings speaking French ruling England. History is weird.
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Old August 23rd, 2017, 09:15 AM   #4
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Vikings speaking French ruling England. History is weird.
Well, they had to rule Normandy first, fair play.
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Old August 24th, 2017, 10:35 AM   #5
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In the days of the Roman Empire the language spoken by the ruling elite among themselves was Greek not Latin.

Ancient Roman Language and Scripts - Crystalinks
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Old August 26th, 2017, 04:16 PM   #6
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Vikings speaking French ruling England. History is weird.
England was the Vikings' colony, that's why they spoke the Scandinavian language

Today the English language has more Latin than German.

It's crime to eat banana - in portuguese - é crime comer banana
..... .......
crime - latin
banana - árabe

similar - latim
café --árabe

puxe - latin
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Old August 27th, 2017, 04:32 AM   #7
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England was the Vikings' colony, that's why they spoke the Scandinavian language

Today the English language has more Latin than German.

It's crime to eat banana - in portuguese - é crime comer banana
..... .......
crime - latin
banana - árabe

similar - latim
café --árabe

puxe - latin
You've got your Scandinavians seriously mixed up. No part of Britain was ever a Scandinavian colony - small parts of England were (briefly) independent Norse kingdoms, and the whole of England was, also briefly, part of a united kingdom with one of the Scandinavian ones. William of Normandy had a serious claim to the throne and ruled it as king. We beat the Norsemen heavily, under Owain Gwynedd, I think, and they never came back. The Normans spoke French and made it the official language in England for a good long time.
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Old August 27th, 2017, 05:34 AM   #8
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe it was the Saxon monarch Alfred of Wessex who made peace with the "Vikings" (actually they were known then as Danes) who agreed to a precarious settlement called the Danelaw, which divided the island between Saxon and Dane from about 800 to 1100 A.D. After the battle of Hastings 1066 the Normans took possession of England as a united feudal monarchy under French nobility. The Saxon language nevertheless remained the Mother Tongue for centuries among the common people.
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Old August 27th, 2017, 05:47 AM   #9
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe it was the Saxon monarch Alfred of Wessex who made peace with the "Vikings" (actually they were known then as Danes) who agreed to a precarious settlement called the Danelaw, which divided the island between Saxon and Dane from about 800 to 1100 A.D. After the battle of Hastings 1066 the Normans took possession of England as a united feudal monarchy under French nobility. The Saxon language nevertheless remained the Mother Tongue for centuries among the common people.
No - the Danelaw didn't last anything like that long - Alfred was busy beginning the defeat of the Vikings. From that time on, however, the eastern areas were certainly part of a Norse political world. We don't know how long it took German ('Anglo-Saxon') to replace British as a spoken language in England or how far the east remained Christian under the pagan German mercenaries, but we do know that Anglo-Saxon survived as a peasant language, mixing with Norman-French to form English during the long wars with France (difficult to call on the troops to fight the foreign buggers in the foreign buggers' language). We can only judge by results - nobody in power was much interested in what mere people spoke until much later. We have a lot of Norse words in English, particularly in Yorkshire dialect, and 'Dad', 'Mam' and 'Nan' are good 'Welsh'.
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Old August 27th, 2017, 12:02 PM   #10
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No - the Danelaw didn't last anything like that long - Alfred was busy beginning the defeat of the Vikings. From that time on, however, the eastern areas were certainly part of a Norse political world. We don't know how long it took German ('Anglo-Saxon') to replace British as a spoken language in England or how far the east remained Christian under the pagan German mercenaries, but we do know that Anglo-Saxon survived as a peasant language, mixing with Norman-French to form English during the long wars with France (difficult to call on the troops to fight the foreign buggers in the foreign buggers' language). We can only judge by results - nobody in power was much interested in what mere people spoke until much later. We have a lot of Norse words in English, particularly in Yorkshire dialect, and 'Dad', 'Mam' and 'Nan' are good 'Welsh'.
The Tudors themselves were Welsh, so one might wonder how many Welsh-Gaelic words since the 1500s have been absorbed into the Mother Tongue. I also understand that Northumbria managed to stay somewhat autonomous even during the Danelaw. So Yorkish would be closer to ancient Saxon, or Scottish, if I understand correctly.
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