‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss

Oct 2010
65,422
26,040
Colorado
#1
6,000 percent fewer invertebrates in less than 50 years.

Good, huh? Maybe not....

‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss

Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized. Huge numbers of bugs have been lost in a pristine national forest in Puerto Rico, the study found, and the forest’s insect-eating animals have gone missing, too.

In 2014, an international team of biologists estimated that, in the past 35 years, the abundance of invertebrates such as beetles and bees had decreased by 45 percent. In places where long-term insect data are available, mainly in Europe, insect numbers are plummeting. A study last year showed a 76 percent decrease in flying insects in the past few decades in German nature preserves.

The latest report, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that this startling loss of insect abundance extends to the Americas. The study’s authors implicate climate change in the loss of tropical invertebrates.

Lots more: ‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss
 
Nov 2012
9,000
3,623
Chicago
#2
6,000 percent fewer invertebrates in less than 50 years.

Good, huh? Maybe not....

‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss

Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A new report suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized. Huge numbers of bugs have been lost in a pristine national forest in Puerto Rico, the study found, and the forest’s insect-eating animals have gone missing, too.

In 2014, an international team of biologists estimated that, in the past 35 years, the abundance of invertebrates such as beetles and bees had decreased by 45 percent. In places where long-term insect data are available, mainly in Europe, insect numbers are plummeting. A study last year showed a 76 percent decrease in flying insects in the past few decades in German nature preserves.

The latest report, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that this startling loss of insect abundance extends to the Americas. The study’s authors implicate climate change in the loss of tropical invertebrates.

Lots more: ‘Hyperalarming’ study shows massive insect loss
Yep, insects just hate a warm climate.:rolleyes: I think we continue to exist without mosquitos; although there would be some unhappy fish.:think:
 
Apr 2013
35,870
24,360
Left coast
#3
As with bees, more and more scientists are becoming concerned with the pesticide and herbicide residuals that are building up in all the environments. Less discussed in media but potentially much more harmful than microplastics.
 
Oct 2010
65,422
26,040
Colorado
#5
Thirty-five percent of the world’s plant crops require pollination by bees, wasps and other animals. And arthropods are more than just pollinators. They’re the planet’s wee custodians, toiling away in unnoticed or avoided corners. They chew up rotting wood and eat carrion. “And none of us want to have more carcasses around,” Schowalter said. Wild insects provide $57 billion worth of six-legged labor in the United States each year, according to a 2006 estimate.
...The loss of insects and arthropods could further rend the rain forest’s food web, Lister warned, causing plant species to go extinct without pollinators. “If the tropical forests go it will be yet another catastrophic failure of the whole Earth system,” he said, “that will feed back on human beings in an almost unimaginable way.”​
A recent analysis of climate change and insects, published in August in the journal Science, predicts a decrease in tropical insect populations, according to an author of that study, Scott Merrill, who studies crop pests at the University of Vermont. In temperate regions farther from the equator, where insects can survive a wider range of temperatures, agricultural pests will devour more food as their metabolism increases, Merrill and his co-authors warned. But after a certain thermal threshold, insects will no longer lay eggs, he said, and their internal chemistry breaks down...."​
The list of changes attributable to warming environment grows. This is a time when true leaders step up and lead. Our leader?

You have scientists on both sides of [climate change]," Trump told the Associated Press during an interview. "My uncle was a great professor at MIT for many years: Dr. John Trump. And I didn’t talk to him about this particular subject, but I have a natural instinct for science, and I will say that you have scientists on both sides of the picture."​
That would make perfect sense, of course, if scientific knowledge was normally passed through the bloodline and science is really just the art of trusting your gut and calling it good. But it's not. The UN report was compiled by 91 scientists from 40 countries who analyzed more than 6,000 scientific studies, and actively choosing to ignore a global coalition of experts—including ones within our own government—is just dangerous and stupid. But, of course, that means little to Trump, who basically just decided to recycle that same rhetoric he used after Charlottesville to say that there are somehow two sides to fact-based science.​
During the interview, Trump also claimed that he is "truly an environmentalist" and said that, yes, while he can agree on the fact that the climate changes, it also "goes back and forth, back and forth," so we shouldn't sweat it too hard. Again, this is all based on his "natural instinct," which apparently supersedes whatever UN scientists prepared that harrowing report. These are the same natural instincts that previously led Trump to stare directly at the sun during a solar eclipse and believe that exercise is bad because humans have finite energy, so take that as you will.​

More: Trump Says He Gets Climate Change Because of His 'Natural Instinct for Science'
 
Likes: Hollywood
Sep 2018
6,579
1,086
cleveland ohio
#6
Thirty-five percent of the world’s plant crops require pollination by bees, wasps and other animals. And arthropods are more than just pollinators. They’re the planet’s wee custodians, toiling away in unnoticed or avoided corners. They chew up rotting wood and eat carrion. “And none of us want to have more carcasses around,” Schowalter said. Wild insects provide $57 billion worth of six-legged labor in the United States each year, according to a 2006 estimate.
...The loss of insects and arthropods could further rend the rain forest’s food web, Lister warned, causing plant species to go extinct without pollinators. “If the tropical forests go it will be yet another catastrophic failure of the whole Earth system,” he said, “that will feed back on human beings in an almost unimaginable way.”​
A recent analysis of climate change and insects, published in August in the journal Science, predicts a decrease in tropical insect populations, according to an author of that study, Scott Merrill, who studies crop pests at the University of Vermont. In temperate regions farther from the equator, where insects can survive a wider range of temperatures, agricultural pests will devour more food as their metabolism increases, Merrill and his co-authors warned. But after a certain thermal threshold, insects will no longer lay eggs, he said, and their internal chemistry breaks down...."​
The list of changes attributable to warming environment grows. This is a time when true leaders step up and lead. Our leader?

You have scientists on both sides of [climate change]," Trump told the Associated Press during an interview. "My uncle was a great professor at MIT for many years: Dr. John Trump. And I didn’t talk to him about this particular subject, but I have a natural instinct for science, and I will say that you have scientists on both sides of the picture."​
That would make perfect sense, of course, if scientific knowledge was normally passed through the bloodline and science is really just the art of trusting your gut and calling it good. But it's not. The UN report was compiled by 91 scientists from 40 countries who analyzed more than 6,000 scientific studies, and actively choosing to ignore a global coalition of experts—including ones within our own government—is just dangerous and stupid. But, of course, that means little to Trump, who basically just decided to recycle that same rhetoric he used after Charlottesville to say that there are somehow two sides to fact-based science.​
During the interview, Trump also claimed that he is "truly an environmentalist" and said that, yes, while he can agree on the fact that the climate changes, it also "goes back and forth, back and forth," so we shouldn't sweat it too hard. Again, this is all based on his "natural instinct," which apparently supersedes whatever UN scientists prepared that harrowing report. These are the same natural instincts that previously led Trump to stare directly at the sun during a solar eclipse and believe that exercise is bad because humans have finite energy, so take that as you will.​

More: Trump Says He Gets Climate Change Because of His 'Natural Instinct for Science'
this is god punishment for destroying his works