Adjudicating the he said she said thing ...

Dec 2018
3,284
966
New England
#1
Ok, for the sake of discussion, let's put civil and criminal cases aside. Let's instead imagine you run a small business, say 50 or 60 employees. Your head of HR comes to your office and informs you that one of your female employees claims that she was sexually assaulted by one of your male employees in the stock room the previous day. No one else was present during the alleged attack.

The buck has now stopped on your desk. What do you do, and why?
 
Dec 2018
3,284
966
New England
#7
I'd pretty much go with my gut on who to believe.

What would you do?
While not quite the scenario I've described here, I've had to make this call before as part of my job. I go with the preponderance standard, i.e. I need to believe the accuser more than the accused. It can often come down to a subjective assessment of both individuals, but often there's at least some evidence to go with (e.g. previous, suspicious behavior; a telling of what happened that doesn't quite hang together).

It's miserable business either way as after you make the call you can't help but wonder if you got it wrong.
 
Dec 2014
27,259
14,962
Memphis, Tn.
#8
This is just my personal opinion, but I think that women should be more physicaly agressive is such situations. If one is alone with a man in such a situation and the man "grabs" the first thing she should do is SCREAM just as loudly as she can TAKE YOUR FUCKING HANDS off me!!!
If that does not make the man immediately retreat I'd suggest kicking him in the cajones as hard as possible.
Quietly walking out of the room as if nothing has happened and later filing a complaint with the HR does not always work. SOME men take a LACK of immediate and agressive resistence/retaliation as a form of permission.
Just an opinion.
 
Dec 2018
3,284
966
New England
#9
This is just my personal opinion, but I think that women should be more physicaly agressive is such situations. If one is alone with a man in such a situation and the man "grabs" the first thing she should do is SCREAM just as loudly as she can TAKE YOUR FUCKING HANDS off me!!!
If that does not make the man immediately retreat I'd suggest kicking him in the cajones as hard as possible.
Quietly walking out of the room as if nothing has happened and later filing a complaint with the HR does not always work. SOME men take a LACK of immediate and agressive resistence/retaliation as a form of permission.
Just an opinion.
I am with you there. There's been a high profile sexual harassment case here in MA; the now former president of our state senate had a problem with his much younger husband. Seems this gent was using his hubby's political clout as cover for sexually harassing men around the State House whom he found attractive. Don't know about you, but if a man attempted a second grab at me (or perhaps even a first) one of the two of us would receive a good beating, and there would be little doubt something happened.

In this way, and I suppose many others, men and women are wired differently. A depressingly large number of women suffer in silence, but during the event and afterward.
 
Dec 2015
17,074
16,015
Arizona
#10
I'd pretty much go with my gut on who to believe.

What would you do?
AND this is where reputation and patterns of behavior come into play.
If the "HE" is known for being late to work, lazy, tells an occasional falsehood or randy story--irresponsible--a joker--a trickster--fairly new to the company (and we all know people like that), "HE" has shown his true colors.
IF the "SHE" has been a long-time employee, always punctual, hard worker, honest, serious-minded--has a husband and happy family, "SHE" has shown her true colors.
If the situation is reversed----same deal. If they share the same traits, fire them both.
Reputation and patterns are the keys to making a decision of this nature.