Americans Strongly Dislike PC Culture

Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#1
The study was written by More in Common, an organization founded in memory of Jo Cox, the British MP who was murdered in the run-up to the Brexit referendum. It is based on a nationally representative poll with 8,000 respondents, 30 one-hour interviews, and six focus groups conducted from December 2017 to September 2018.

If you look at what Americans have to say on issues such as immigration, the extent of white privilege, and the prevalence of sexual harassment, the authors argue, seven distinct clusters emerge: progressive activists, traditional liberals, passive liberals, the politically disengaged, moderates, traditional conservatives, and devoted conservatives

According to the report, 25 percent of Americans are traditional or devoted conservatives, and their views are far outside the American mainstream. Some 8 percent of Americans are progressive activists, and their views are even less typical. By contrast, the two-thirds of Americans who don’t belong to either extreme constitute an “exhausted majority.” Their members “share a sense of fatigue with our polarized national conversation, a willingness to be flexible in their political viewpoints, and a lack of voice in the national conversation.”

Most members of the “exhausted majority,” and then some, dislike political correctness. Among the general population, a full 80 percent believe that “political correctness is a problem in our country.” Even young people are uncomfortable with it, including 74 percent ages 24 to 29, and 79 percent under age 24. On this particular issue, the woke are in a clear minority across allages.


Large Majorities Dislike Political Correctness - The Atlantic
 
Nov 2005
8,777
3,269
California
#3
The article also called out exactly what I was thinking...
One obvious question is what people mean by “political correctness.” In the extended interviews and focus groups, participants made clear that they were concerned about their day-to-day ability to express themselves: They worry that a lack of familiarity with a topic, or an unthinking word choice, could lead to serious social sanctions for them. But since the survey question did not define political correctness for respondents, we cannot be sure what, exactly, the 80 percent of Americans who regard it as a problem have in mind.​

Quite frankly, I can think of some examples of political correctness I see as a problem as well.
At the same time, I have noted in the past that my definition of "political correctness" is clearly different from what some conservative definitions of "political correctness" is.

Hell.
Here's an article about a conservative pedophile who whines about political correctness regarding his illegal urges.
Congressional Candidate In Virginia Admits He’s A Pedophile | HuffPost
 
Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#4
The article also called out exactly what I was thinking...
One obvious question is what people mean by “political correctness.” In the extended interviews and focus groups, participants made clear that they were concerned about their day-to-day ability to express themselves: They worry that a lack of familiarity with a topic, or an unthinking word choice, could lead to serious social sanctions for them. But since the survey question did not define political correctness for respondents, we cannot be sure what, exactly, the 80 percent of Americans who regard it as a problem have in mind.​

Quite frankly, I can think of some examples of political correctness I see as a problem as well.
At the same time, I have noted in the past that my definition of "political correctness" is clearly different from what some conservative definitions of "political correctness" is.

Hell.
Here's an article about a conservative pedophile who whines about political correctness regarding his illegal urges.
Congressional Candidate In Virginia Admits He’s A Pedophile | HuffPost

That is not very PC.

They prefer to be called MAPs

I like how you try and toss that at conservatives though. Remember salons articles about mainstreaming MAPs? (Now scrubbed)Definitely not a conservative publication.




Nice distraction though.
 
Nov 2005
8,777
3,269
California
#6
That is not very PC.
Maybe you don't define it as PC according to your definition.
It's not "PC" according to my definition.
But the point is that we don't all have the same definition of "PC".

You talk to neo-nazis, they'll complain about "PC" not allowing them to slur blacks or Jews in public.
The definition of "PC" is subjective.


I like how you try and toss that at conservatives though.
He was whining about PC, right?
#sarcasm


Remember salons articles about mainstreaming MAPs? (Now scrubbed)Definitely not a conservative publication.
We could talk about the actual article in a relevant thread.
Suffice it to summarize that Salon did not try to do the things that many try to accuse them of regarding the article.


Nice distraction though.
Not a distraction.
You may have gotten distraction, but there was a point there that you either missed or are ignoring.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2014
27,184
14,910
Memphis, Tn.
#7
That is not very PC.

They prefer to be called MAPs

I like how you try and toss that at conservatives though. Remember salons articles about mainstreaming MAPs? (Now scrubbed)Definitely not a conservative publication.




Nice distraction though.
Really? The article itself is not importtant but rather what publication it's printed in?
Exactly WHY is that?
 
Jan 2015
3,488
2,210
MD
#8
I guess I’d fall under the exhausted majority. I simply just avoid politics all together, and refuse to engage with it. My biggest issue is outrage culture. Social justice became about finding things to be angry about and whining, rather than actually working to make the world a better place.

People get outraged about trivial foolishness to the extent that the things that we actually should be outraged about don’t even matter anymore. I see why ppl don’t like SJWs now — their arguments are disingenuous, and they simply want the power that social media gives them to terrorize people.
 
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Dec 2006
26,653
11,795
New Haven, CT
#9
I always think that the P.C. should be decided by the people who are being respected in the individual circumstances.
For example: if a white man wears black face, it's racist. Now, if a white man puts on a fat stomach and a white curled wig and square glasses and impersonates Ben Franklin, but if he does the same thing in black face and impersonates an African American, it's racist. I have to admit, I'm not really sure why it's demeaning. If a kid in middle school LOVES Michael Jackson and wants to dress up like him on Halloween as a form of idol worship, it doesn't seem degrading to me. HOWEVER. It's not me that's being offended. And if the black community says they find it insulting, offensive, demeaning and degrading, there is no fucking way I'm going to say it's okay and try to come up with some kind of bizarre wackjob semantics gymnastics to attempt making it seem acceptable. If the people it's insulting say it's insulting... STOP DOING IT. Period.
And so it goes with almost all P.C. issues.
Granted, there are a few overboard ones. But, the vast majority of P.C. language is simply civilized, humane, polite, compassionate behavior towards others - unless you INTEND to be insulting and demeaning.