Are There Problems With the Boeing 737 Max? A Second Deadly Crash Raises New Questions

Apr 2014
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Jun 2018
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IDK. We'll soon find out.
This condition isn't characteristic of all 737s. Just the up engined models that have repositioned the engines forward on the wing. That article I posted explains it pretty well.
If a stall were under way they should have been warned about a stall condition. If they got no warning and the plane was "normal" to them then the rapid nose down attitude change that couldn't be corrected by pulling the control yoke back to raise the nose would be terrifying. If it's a false condition then the pilots have just a few seconds to deactivate the system causing the fault. At low altitudes there may not be time to do that.

Just saw an alert that several airlines have grounded their 737-8Max aircraft.

Another tidbit, according to Fox the Lion air Boeing should not have flown due to maintenance issues.
 
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If a stall were under way they should have been warned about a stall condition. If they got no warning and the plane was "normal" to them then the rapid nose down attitude change that couldn't be corrected by pulling the control yoke back to raise the nose would be terrifying. If it's a false condition then the pilots have just a few seconds to deactivate the system causing the fault. At low altitudes there may not be time to do that.

Just saw an alert that several airlines have grounded their 737-8Max aircraft.

Another tidbit, according to Fox the Lion air Boeing should not have flown due to maintenance issues.
What makes you think stall? I didn't see that in either article.
 
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IDK. We'll soon find out.
This condition isn't characteristic of all 737s. Just the up engined models that have repositioned the engines forward on the wing. That article I posted explains it pretty well.
Yes, but the MCAS can be turned off and manually trimmed.

From your OP article: "...many airlines around the world use this model.

In the United States, American Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines are all operators, using it on routes like Miami-New York and Dallas-Chicago. Other major carriers around the world include AerolĂ­neas Argentinas, Air China, Icelandair and LOT Polish Airlines.
"

If there was a problem with the aircraft design, there'd be reports. The Max 8, as your article notes, has been flying the longest of the new models. Tens of thousands of flight hours would have been built up on the model. If there was a problem, there'd have been several close calls and reports by pilots. Just two crashes with no other problems noted on the design is a curiosity, but not necessarily a design issue. Regardless, many of the foreign airlines have grounded their Max 8s for review.
 
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Is that what they both received? False stall warnings? Agreed on the flight data recorder (FDR).

Cockpit Voice Recorders (CVR) and Flight Data Recorders (FDR)
From what I have gathered, the system can be cut off by disabling automatic trim. There also is now discussion of why the the system should have to be switched off, instead of the option of switching it on. I can't imagine any pilot flying this plane taking off again with it switched on.
 
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From what I have gathered, the system can be cut off by disabling automatic trim. There also is now discussion of why the the system should have to be switched off, instead of the option of switching it on. I can't imagine any pilot flying this plane taking off again with it switched on.
If there have been problems reported with it, that would be a good idea. As it is, if a problem develops, it can be easily turned off.
 
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If there have been problems reported with it, that would be a good idea. As it is, if a problem develops, it can be easily turned off.
"easiiy turned off" is a direct reference to the comment made about pilot training and the number of hrs in the co-pilot seat before moving into the left seat.
I still have a mental image of the pilot with the control yoke in his lap screaming for the plane to stop diving because in the panic he can't remember what to do to stop it.
 
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"easiiy turned off" is a direct reference to the comment made about pilot training and the number of hrs in the co-pilot seat before moving into the left seat.
I still have a mental image of the pilot with the control yoke in his lap screaming for the plane to stop diving because in the panic he can't remember what to do to stop it.
Since several US airlines fly the same make and model with no problems I suspect either a training issue or how foreign carriers maintain their aircraft.