Border-crossing arrests are at historic lows — but Trump is still bemoaning a 'drastic surge' in illegal immigration

May 2018
5,800
3,781
Chicago
#2
Well yeah, Trump has made this a pretty unattractive country for immigrants, legal or illegal. I lost my last roommate due to Trump. She taught English as a second language at Depaul. When Trump got elected, guess what? No foreign students felt safe coming here for school. As a result, her department was shut down. She lost her job and had to move out.
 
Jul 2014
14,425
8,755
massachusetts
#3
The "caravan" is down to 4000 people, and they are still about 1000 miles from the border.
It will be a month before they arrive, and they'll be a blip on the number of asylum requests.

Yet the fear mongers keep yammering about an invasion.
 
Nov 2012
22,986
5,049
Gamma Solaris
#4
  • But government data show the number of people arrested while trying to illegally cross the border is hovering near the bottom of a decades-long downward trend.
Border-crossing arrests are at historic lows — but Trump is still bemoaning a 'drastic surge' in illegal immigration
Here's what the trend looks like:
November 2nd, 2018 is not January 12th, 2019. Try the stats, again.

But...the meme seems to be "less isn't a problem". Okay...consider this:

Poisonous snakes kill only 5 people each year in the USA. That's 5 out of...what...320M??? Thereabouts. So???

Let a rattlesnake take up residence in your house...and...don't pay any attention to it.

Just a week ago...one cop got bit and died...leaving a five month old baby and a grieving widow, behind.
 
Sep 2018
6,679
1,118
cleveland ohio
#5
November 2nd, 2018 is not January 12th, 2019. Try the stats, again.

But...the meme seems to be "less isn't a problem". Okay...consider this:

Poisonous snakes kill only 5 people each year in the USA. That's 5 out of...what...320M??? Thereabouts. So???

Let a rattlesnake take up residence in your house...and...don't pay any attention to it.

Just a week ago...one cop got bit and died...leaving a five month old baby and a grieving widow, behind.
Anecdotal evidence is evidence from anecdotes, i.e., evidence collected in a casual or informal manner and relying heavily or entirely on personal testimony. When compared to other types of evidence, anecdotal evidence is generally regarded as limited in value due to a number of potential weaknesses, but may be considered within the scope of scientific method as some anecdotal evidence can be both empirical and verifiable, e.g. in the use of case studies in medicine. Other anecdotal evidence, however, does not qualify as scientific evidence, because its nature prevents it from being investigated by the scientific method.

Where only one or a few anecdotes are presented, there is a larger chance that they may be unreliable due to cherry-picked or otherwise non-representative samples of typical cases.[1][2] Similarly, psychologists have found that due to cognitive bias people are more likely to remember notable or unusual examples rather than typical examples.[3] Thus, even when accurate, anecdotal evidence is not necessarily representative of a typical experience. Accurate determination of whether an anecdote is typical requires statistical evidence.[4] Misuse of anecdotal evidence is an informal fallacy and is sometimes referred to as the "person who" fallacy ("I know a person who..."; "I know of a case where..." etc.) which places undue weight on experiences of close peers which may not be typical.

The term is sometimes used in a legal context to describe certain kinds of testimony which are uncorroborated by objective, independent evidence such as notarized documentation, photographs, audio-visual recordings, etc.

When used in advertising or promotion of a product, service, or idea, anecdotal reports are often called a testimonial, which are highly regulated[5] or banned in some[which?] jurisdictions. Anecdotal evidence - Wikipedia anecodotes are rarely represetative and often cherry picked