California cities fight homeless rights bill

Jun 2014
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4,380
United States
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California Cities Oppose Homeless 'Right to Rest' | Al Jazeera America

An influential league of California cities is opposing a bill that would allow people to rest in public areas — a position that homeless activists argue is consistent with the group's history of supporting abuses against marginalized groups.

The Right to Rest bill, which moves to a state Senate hearing on April 7, would allow homeless individuals to sit, stand, eat or rest without it being a criminal offense.

Municipal laws in California targeting these behaviors have skyrocketed in past years, a recent report showed, with researchers identifying over 500 restrictions in California municipalities — nearly nine laws per city, on average.

The League of California Cities, an association of California city officials that work to influence policy decisions, drafted a petition last week against the bill, arguing that it doesn’t provide a solution to homelessness and would "undermine the ability of all others to access clean and non-threatening public spaces."

For rights advocates, that's tantamount to calling the homeless dirty and threatening.

The League “hides or puts a veil over the race and class issues that are really behind this … but it always seeps through,” said Paul Boden, executive director of the Western Regional Advocacy Project (WRAP).

“Bottom line,” Boden said, the League is saying, “‘We don’t want to see these people, and we want to preserve our authority to pass and enforce these laws, so if too many come around to make us uncomfortable, we can use these laws to get rid of them.’”

The homeless are not the first marginalized group targeted by the League in its over 100-year history, according to documents provided by the Western Center on Law and Poverty (WCLP), an organization that works on the behalf of low-income Californians.

Past League targets for the removal from public space or even entire municipalities include Chinese, Japanese and African Americans, as well as “any person who is diseased, maimed, mutilated, or in any way deformed so as to be an unsightly or disgusting object,” according to the documents.

To counteract the League of California Cities’ opposition to the bill, WRAP, WCLP and other social justice groups sent a letter to Jim Beall, chairman of the California Transportation and Housing Committee, who will oversee this week's hearing on the bill. In it, the advocacy groups placed the group’s resistance to the Right to Rest bill into a long history of antipathy toward the downtrodden.
Human rights are really becoming an issue in this nation which loves to pretend it's "Christian". What a crock.
 
Apr 2013
34,274
23,154
Left coast
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Depending on how things like "rest" are defined, I would agree with at least the intent of this bill.
 
Jun 2014
11,878
4,380
United States
#3
Depending on how things like "rest" are defined, I would agree with at least the intent of this bill.
Why? Wouldn't it be better to pass a bill increasing the number of affordable housing units and making mental health hospitals by taxing the rich than beating up the homeless all the time?
 
Apr 2013
34,274
23,154
Left coast
#5
Why? Wouldn't it be better to pass a bill increasing the number of affordable housing units and making mental health hospitals by taxing the rich than beating up the homeless all the time?
Aggressive panhandlers and belligerent homeless need some type of controlling. Yes, improvements in the areas you are talking about is justified in some cases, but there are also lots of cases of the problems being self-inflicted. And many homeless do nothing to try and fix their situation where there is no justification for their inaction.

But there is no way I or my family should be accosted trying to enter a business or just walk down a street by some homeless person who thinks the world owes them a living.