California meets greenhouse gas reduction goal years early

Apr 2013
37,107
25,315
La La Land North
#1
And it didn't even hurt. GHG emissions are now below the 1990 levels.

The California Air Resources Board announced pollution levels were down 13 per cent since their 2004 peak — as the economy grew 26 per cent since that year. The achievement was roughly equal to taking 12 million cars off the road or saving 22.7 billion litres of gasoline a year, the board said.

-~-

Greenhouse gas emissions dropped 2.7 per cent in 2016 — the latest year available — to about 430 million metric tonnes, the board said. That's just below the 431 million metric tonnes produced in 1990.

California law requires that emissions return to 1990 levels by 2020 and reach 40 per cent below that marker by 2030. The Air Resources Board has broad authority to achieve those goals in the nation's most populous state
.

California meets greenhouse gas reduction goal years early | CBC News
 
Likes: 1 person
Jun 2013
28,864
15,446
Ohio
#2
And to think California could pull that off while ascending from the world’s 6th largest economy to the world’s 5th largest economy. Too bad those “deregulated” Red States can’t hold a candle to California’s economic excellence.
 
Dec 2013
33,442
19,259
Beware of watermelons
#6
And solar electricians.

B)
Lol



Indeed, the article notes, California had the highest rate of solar power jobs per capita in 2016, thanks to its “robust renewable energy standards and installation incentives” (ie, mandates and subsidies).

In reality, it’s not a good thing at all, and certainly not a positive trend. In fact, as Climate Depot and the Washington Examiner point out — citing an American Enterprise Institute study — the job numbers actually underscore how wasteful, inefficient and unproductive solar power actually is.

That is glaringly obvious when you look at the amounts of energy produced per sector. (This tally does not include electricity generated by nuclear, hydroelectric and geothermal power plants.)

398,000 natural gas workers = 33.8% of all electricity generated in the United States in 2016
160,000 coal employees = 30.4 % of total electricity
100,000 wind employees = 5.6% of total electricity
374,000 solar workers = 0.9% of total electricity
It’s even more glaring when you look at the amount of electricity generated per worker. Coal generated an incredible 7,745 megawatt-hours of electricity per worker; natural gas 3,812 MWH per worker; wind a measly 836 MWH for every employee; and solar an abysmal 98 MWH per worker.

In other words, producing the same amount of electricity requires one coal worker, two natural gas workers — 12 wind industry employees or 79 solar workers.
https://mises.org/wire/more-solar-jobs-curse-not-blessing
 
Dec 2013
33,442
19,259
Beware of watermelons
#7
And to think California could pull that off while ascending from the world’s 6th largest economy to the world’s 5th largest economy. Too bad those “deregulated” Red States can’t hold a candle to California’s economic excellence.
Earlier this week, the LA Times reminded its readers that California has the highest poverty rate in the nation.

Specifically, when using the Census Bureau's most recent" Supplemental Poverty Measure" (SPM), California clocks in with a poverty rate of 20 percent, which places it as worst in the nation.

To be sure, California is running quite closely with Florida and Louisiana, but we can certainly say that California is a top contender when it comes to poverty:


https://mises.org/wire/why-california-has-nations-worst-poverty-rate-1
 
Dec 2013
33,442
19,259
Beware of watermelons
#9
And it didn't even hurt. GHG emissions are now below the 1990 levels.

.

California meets greenhouse gas reduction goal years early | CBC News
He's not alone. Indeed.com Chief Economist Jed Kolko notes that Census Bureau data from July 2016 to July 2017 show that California had a net loss of 138,000 people. Where did they go? Here's a hint: Texas had a net population gain of 79,000, Arizona 63,000, and Nevada more than 38,000.

California, one of the most beautiful states in the union, is a fiscal and economic mess. Its rigid regulations make it absurdly difficult to build housing, so prices have soared for both apartments and homes. Want a two-bedroom apartment? In Los Angeles, it will set you back $2,249 a month; in San Francisco it's nearly $3,400 a month.

The same sized apartment in Las Vegas costs $1,122 a month; in Phoenx, it's $1,137.

It isn't just housing. A 40% hike in the gasoline tax has hit low-income Californians hard. Income tax rates have also been ratcheted up in recent years. And regulations make it harder and harder to start a business in California. So lower-income, struggling families are being forced out of the state.

"When It Comes To Paying Taxes, California Is Bernie Sanders' Kind Of State," said a 2016 L.A. Times headline. It wasn't kidding. About 155,000 taxpayers out of 15.7 million pay half of all the state's income taxes. With the steeply progressive tax code hitting even middle-income people, it won't be long before there's an exodus of well-to-do residents, too.

There's no relief in sight. California's white elephant "high-speed rail," Gov. Jerry Brown's pet project, will cost more than $100 billion to build but carry at best a couple thousand people a day. Meanwhile, the state's one-party rule ensures that insane ideas like a $400 billion a year single-payer health care system continue to be seriously discussed, even though as any first-year accounting student would tell you it will bankrupt the state.

https://www.investors.com/politics/...oing-the-once-unthinkable-leaving-california/
 
Likes: 1 person
Nov 2012
10,581
8,736
nirvana
#10

Eighteen percent of all electricity in the United States was produced by renewable sources in 2017, including solar, wind, and hydroelectric dams. That’s up from 15% in 2016, with the shift driven by new solar and wind projects, the end of droughts in the West, and a dip in the share of natural gas generation. Meanwhile, both greenhouse gas emissions from power generation and consumer spending on power declined.

Renewables’ share of U.S. energy consumption has now doubled since 2008, as coal’s share crashed in the same period from 48% to 30%. And while the Trump administration has signaled a desire to cut funding for renewable energy and efficiency programs, the trends seem set to continue thanks to market forces.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.


Solar and wind projects made up roughly 62% of new power construction in 2017, as their cost continues to plummet. And 2.9 gigawatts of new renewable energy projects were initiated last year, while 12.5 gigawatts worth of coal plants are set to shut down in 2018 – also part of an accelerating trend. Thanks to that shift, the solar and wind industries are creating jobs faster than the rest of the economy.

The findings come from the 2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook, produced each year by the Business Council for Sustainable Energy and Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Efficiency was another big takeaway from the report. While the U.S. economy has continued a healthy expansion, total U.S. energy consumption actually declined in 2017 by 0.2%, illustrating the economy’s ability to do more while consuming less power.

Renewable Energy Surges to 18% of U.S. Power Mix | Fortune