California Paradise lost

Nov 2018
6,601
4,096
Rocky Mountains
Yeah, I feel you. When I was too busy working I actually believed that free enterprise unfettered by regulations and trickle-down worked and that wealth inequality was not a bad thing. Then a medical condition forced me to retire early and I suddenly had time to actually study those and related things and found out that supporting them was due to simplistic thinking and they were entirely wrong.
If you are a conservative when young you have no brains, if you are not a liberal when you get older, you have no heart.
 
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Dec 2014
28,691
16,329
Memphis, Tn.
I have no 401k but I do invest and I am doing well with that over the last few years since Trump. I am not a Trump historian or Fanatic so I don't know about what you said. I just know the basics. Billionaire, hot wives and girlfriends, knows how to win and is our president and will continue as.

We will see what he plans for us in the next 4 years.

FIRST the Twitter Twit has to get re-elected...
 
Mar 2020
1,429
371
Land of Freedom
You consider Miss Lindsay a hot girlfriend? Gross.
I don't know who that is. As I said, I am not a Trump fanatic or historian. To be honest, I don't vote and do not care who the president is. It doesn't affect me. I am not one of those guys who wait around for someone else to come save my ass. When things get tough the tough get tougher. You can vote for that cuts regulations, eases taxes and makes it easier to get ahead or you can vote for the guy that will raise make more regulations, taxes, lets in more illegals, makes more welfare, thus lowering you to and your kid to the lowest common denominator.

none of it matters to me, I write my own salary.
 
Mar 2020
1,429
371
Land of Freedom
The Cost of Bad Intentions

“Last year, San Francisco police fielded more than 28,000 complaints of human excrement in the streets.”


A decade ago, San Francisco was making headway against widespread vagrancy, passing laws that banned aggressive panhandling and lying on sidewalks. But lawyers from many of the city’s top firms, working pro bono to represent homeless people, fought every arrest and citation, discouraging the police. California’s state constitution also thwarted a campaign in the state’s cities, including San Francisco, to set up community courts like those that New York City established in the 1990s, where ticketed panhandlers were brought before judges immediately and often required to begin serving sentences for community service the same day that they were charged. As those efforts stalled in San Francisco, the city’s political establishment turned increasingly tolerant. By 2015, though residents had registered more than 60,000 complaints with the police over vagrancy, public urination, and other crimes associated with street people, cops arrested just 125 people on such charges. The city budget already expends $280 million on homeless services, but last November, voters approved a $250 million gross-receipts tax on city companies to pay for additional homeless services, including more shelters and hygiene programs. Critics had opposed the tax in part because in the last several years, San Francisco had already nearly doubled its homeless spending, with no appreciable effect. “What we can tell from past experience is that five years from now you’re still going to have 7,000 people out on the street,” Jim Lazarus of the city’s Chamber of Commerce said. Last year, police fielded more than 28,000 complaints of human excrement in the streets. One infectious-disease expert told a local TV station that the level of contamination on San Francisco’s streets was greater than in poor cities in Brazil, India, and Kenya. The homeless are also thought to be a key factor in the city’s rising crime. San Francisco now has the highest property crime rate of any major city in America.

 
Nov 2018
6,601
4,096
Rocky Mountains
The Cost of Bad Intentions

“Last year, San Francisco police fielded more than 28,000 complaints of human excrement in the streets.”


A decade ago, San Francisco was making headway against widespread vagrancy, passing laws that banned aggressive panhandling and lying on sidewalks. But lawyers from many of the city’s top firms, working pro bono to represent homeless people, fought every arrest and citation, discouraging the police. California’s state constitution also thwarted a campaign in the state’s cities, including San Francisco, to set up community courts like those that New York City established in the 1990s, where ticketed panhandlers were brought before judges immediately and often required to begin serving sentences for community service the same day that they were charged. As those efforts stalled in San Francisco, the city’s political establishment turned increasingly tolerant. By 2015, though residents had registered more than 60,000 complaints with the police over vagrancy, public urination, and other crimes associated with street people, cops arrested just 125 people on such charges. The city budget already expends $280 million on homeless services, but last November, voters approved a $250 million gross-receipts tax on city companies to pay for additional homeless services, including more shelters and hygiene programs. Critics had opposed the tax in part because in the last several years, San Francisco had already nearly doubled its homeless spending, with no appreciable effect. “What we can tell from past experience is that five years from now you’re still going to have 7,000 people out on the street,” Jim Lazarus of the city’s Chamber of Commerce said. Last year, police fielded more than 28,000 complaints of human excrement in the streets. One infectious-disease expert told a local TV station that the level of contamination on San Francisco’s streets was greater than in poor cities in Brazil, India, and Kenya. The homeless are also thought to be a key factor in the city’s rising crime. San Francisco now has the highest property crime rate of any major city in America.

Clearly there are more efficient, more effective options and with more long-lasting benefit.... such as imprisonment or harsher punishment. The issue is not that a convenient solution that deprives individuals of rights is needed... that is always easier especially when it is endorsed by "freedom-loving" conservatives. The issue is finding a solution to homelessness without criminalizing mental illness or poverty.
 
Mar 2020
1,429
371
Land of Freedom
This what is happening in California why people are fleeing. It also covers how the minimum wage is killing the poor.
 
Jul 2019
12,440
9,022
Georgia
This what is happening in California why people are fleeing. It also covers how the minimum wage is killing the poor.
is this the same PragerU that made that video?

 
Mar 2020
1,429
371
Land of Freedom
No, this is an independent video made by Will Witt and can be found in many places. He put a lot of research into such a short and precise video. Again, what you are trying to do is called a genetic fallacy.
 
Jul 2019
12,440
9,022
Georgia
No, this is an independent video made by Will Witt and can be found in many places. He put a lot of research into such a short and precise video. Again, what you are trying to do is called a genetic fallacy.
oh this guy


when the source is a recognized hate propaganda group, I don't care about your genetic fallacy melt.
 
Mar 2020
1,429
371
Land of Freedom
Yes, he and another genetic fallacy from you. I see you don't even live in California, so don't melt.
 
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