Can someone explain the value of "Hate Crime" legislation?

Dec 2018
3,941
1,128
New England
Someone mentioned the term "hate crime" in another thread, and it reminded me of a problem I have with it.

To the best of my knowledge, "hate crime" laws do not make otherwise legal acts illegal. They are essentially a modifier to existing law, making the punishment for that crime more severe if it's deemed the perp committed the act out of some kind of "hate," and that is almost always racial hatred.

But help me here. What's really the difference between someone who committed the act of murder out of racial hatred versus, say, jealousy, or greed, or religious fervor, or any of the other extreme emotions? Is the victim any more or less dead? Is the offender any more or less a risk to society? Is the injustice done greater or less?

I just don't get it, beyond a desire on the part of some to "do something" about racial hatred. Hate crime law seems to me to be an empty gesture.
 
Apr 2019
2,995
492
America
"They" are going after the 1st amendment. In Europe you can be arrested for a hate crime for what you say. Needless to say, the government decides what hate is. Self censorship out if fear is what it will accomplish and will solve nothing, it will make things worse. And when they get worse the government will take more rights away. A beeline to totalitarianism.
 
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Nov 2018
4,861
2,565
Rocky Mountains
Someone mentioned the term "hate crime" in another thread, and it reminded me of a problem I have with it.

To the best of my knowledge, "hate crime" laws do not make otherwise legal acts illegal. They are essentially a modifier to existing law, making the punishment for that crime more severe if it's deemed the perp committed the act out of some kind of "hate," and that is almost always racial hatred.

But help me here. What's really the difference between someone who committed the act of murder out of racial hatred versus, say, jealousy, or greed, or religious fervor, or any of the other extreme emotions? Is the victim any more or less dead? Is the offender any more or less a risk to society? Is the injustice done greater or less?

I just don't get it, beyond a desire on the part of some to "do something" about racial hatred. Hate crime law seems to me to be an empty gesture.
Learn about mens rea.
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
68,577
28,370
Colorado
A hate crime is a distinct category of criminal action.

The term "hate crime" came into common usage in the United States during the 1980s, but it is often used retrospectively in order to describe events which occurred prior to that era.[9] From the Roman persecution of Christians to the Nazi slaughter of Jews, hate crimes were committed by both individuals and governments long before the term was commonly used.[4] A major part of defining a crime as a hate crime is that it is directed toward a historically oppressed group.[10][11]

As Europeans began to colonize the world from the 16th century onwards, indigenous peoples in the colonized areas, such as Native Americans increasingly became the targets of bias-motivated intimidation and violence.[citation needed] During the past two centuries, typical examples of hate crimes in the U.S. include lynchings of African Americans, largely in the South, and lynchings of Mexicans and Chinese in the West; cross burnings to intimidate black activists or drive black families from predominantly white neighborhoods both during and after Reconstruction; assaults on white people traveling in predominantly black neighborhoods; assaults on lesbian, gay, bisexualand transgender people; the painting of swastikas on Jewish synagogues; and xenophobicresponses to a variety of minority ethnic groups.
[12]

 
Apr 2019
2,995
492
America
A hate crime is a distinct category of criminal action.

The term "hate crime" came into common usage in the United States during the 1980s, but it is often used retrospectively in order to describe events which occurred prior to that era.[9] From the Roman persecution of Christians to the Nazi slaughter of Jews, hate crimes were committed by both individuals and governments long before the term was commonly used.[4] A major part of defining a crime as a hate crime is that it is directed toward a historically oppressed group.[10][11]

As Europeans began to colonize the world from the 16th century onwards, indigenous peoples in the colonized areas, such as Native Americans increasingly became the targets of bias-motivated intimidation and violence.[citation needed] During the past two centuries, typical examples of hate crimes in the U.S. include lynchings of African Americans, largely in the South, and lynchings of Mexicans and Chinese in the West; cross burnings to intimidate black activists or drive black families from predominantly white neighborhoods both during and after Reconstruction; assaults on white people traveling in predominantly black neighborhoods; assaults on lesbian, gay, bisexualand transgender people; the painting of swastikas on Jewish synagogues; and xenophobicresponses to a variety of minority ethnic groups.
[12]

That means someone else, except that individual accused gets to define that individual's hate. It is a law that can be manipulated to suit a political purpose. That is bullshit.
 
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Aug 2018
494
279
been around
....and there's the kicker. To mention how criminal migrants are destroying your society is forbidden by law.
It fits perfectly with the article on how to destroy a society; when you can't even say it's happening.....and news organizations will be banned if they say it.
One of the basic hallmarks of fascism and totittarianism is the forcible suppression of dissent; and this is the textbook instance of it's beginning.
Think it'll get better, or worse?
 
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