Christian Organizations Being Very Christian ... Again ...

Dec 2006
26,553
11,662
New Haven, CT
#1
Evangelical group wants gays removed from anti-lynching bill
Liberty Counsel Chairman Mat Staver opposes including the words "sexual orientation" and "gender identity" in a federal anti-lynching bill.
190109-mat-staver-liberty-counsel-2018-ac-422p_ca5a01ac77d97307b04c8ec40268b1ed.fit-560w.JPG
Founder and Chairman of the Liberty Counsel Mat Staver, right, speaks during live nativity scene
outside of the Supreme Court in Washington on December 12, 2018.


"The old saying is once that camel gets the nose in the tent, you can't stop them from coming the rest of the way in," Staver said in an interview with conservative Christian news outlet OneNewsNow. “This is a way to slip it in under a so-called anti-lynching bill, and to then to sort of circle the wagon and then go for the juggler [sic] at some time in the future."

Staver told OneNewsNow that his organization, which has been labeled an anti-LGBTQ “hate group” by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is lobbying lawmakers in the House to have them remove the bill’s “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” language before taking a vote.


Similarly, the group encouraged Congress in November to remove language about "sexual orientation" and "gender identity" discrimination from a trade agreement with Mexico and Canada.

Liberty Counsel did not immediately respond to NBC News' request for comment.

The anti-lynching bill, introduced in June by the Senate’s three black members — Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.— applies to lynchings motivated by a victim’s “actual or perceived religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability.”

In a statement released shortly after the bill’s unanimous Senate passage on Dec. 19, Booker called it “an emotional and historic day.”

“For over a century, members of Congress have attempted to pass some version of a bill that would recognize lynching for what it is: a bias-motivated act of terror. And for more than a century, and more than 200 attempts, this body has failed,” Booker stated. “We have righted that wrong and taken corrective action that recognizes this stain on our country’s history.”

The bill notes that at least 4,742 people, mainly African-Americans, were reportedly lynched in the U.S. from 1882 to 1968.

Evangelical group wants gays removed from anti-lynching bill
 
Dec 2006
26,553
11,662
New Haven, CT
#3
Can you imagine a group of supposed Christian leaders fighting to keep it from being made illegal to lynch gays and transgendered?!

I know they're ignorant and bigoted ... but this truly gobsmacks me.

I did know that there was an addendum on the trade agreement with Mexico that states the U.S. already complies with all gay equal rights laws (which is not true).
 
Apr 2014
3,170
1,364
redacted
#4
Can you imagine a group of supposed Christian leaders fighting to keep it from being made illegal to lynch gays and transgendered?!

I know they're ignorant and bigoted ... but this truly gobsmacks me.

I did know that there was an addendum on the trade agreement with Mexico that states the U.S. already complies with all gay equal rights laws (which is not true).
The bigotry is easy to see. Anyone who tars all of one group for the actions of a very small minority is guilty of pushing a bigoted agenda. I've seen it in racists to use examples of gang-bangers in Chicago raping a woman in order to blame all black Americans. It's a strategy that promotes hate and divides Americans who seek to find peaceful, civil ways to resolve our nation's problems.

That said, I have several problems with your proposal; First, I'd prefer religious groups stay out of politics. In many instances it violates their tax exempt status. Now you are pushing for more Christians to become involved in politics to stop assholes like the bigoted douchebags in the "Liberty Counsel". IMO, the best solution isn't to encourage more religious involvement in politics but to tighten up rules and enforcement regarding tax-exempt status of religious organizations. OTOH, I think you are more interested in lynching all Christians than in making the US a more just and fair nation.

Second, I'm against "hate crimes". Murder is murder. Lynching, multiple shootings, burning and being dragged behind a car make a murder more heinous, but it shouldn't matter the religion, gender, skin tone or any other factor either the victim or the murderers. If a friend and I are murdered by the KKK with him being black and me being white, why should the murderers be charged with extra crimes for his murder and not mine? Isn't that racist?

Lastly, I strongly support keeping government secular but the atheists who constantly demonize (<--note the irony) Christians (oddly, not Jews or Muslims) are part of the problem, not part of the solution.
 
Dec 2015
16,429
15,265
Arizona
#5
Evangelical group wants gays removed from anti-lynching bill
Liberty Counsel Chairman Mat Staver opposes including the words "sexual orientation" and "gender identity" in a federal anti-lynching bill.
View attachment 2634
Founder and Chairman of the Liberty Counsel Mat Staver, right, speaks during live nativity scene
outside of the Supreme Court in Washington on December 12, 2018.


"The old saying is once that camel gets the nose in the tent, you can't stop them from coming the rest of the way in," Staver said in an interview with conservative Christian news outlet OneNewsNow. “This is a way to slip it in under a so-called anti-lynching bill, and to then to sort of circle the wagon and then go for the juggler [sic] at some time in the future."

Staver told OneNewsNow that his organization, which has been labeled an anti-LGBTQ “hate group” by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is lobbying lawmakers in the House to have them remove the bill’s “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” language before taking a vote.

Similarly, the group encouraged Congress in November to remove language about "sexual orientation" and "gender identity" discrimination from a trade agreement with Mexico and Canada.

Liberty Counsel did not immediately respond to NBC News' request for comment.

The anti-lynching bill, introduced in June by the Senate’s three black members — Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.— applies to lynchings motivated by a victim’s “actual or perceived religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability.”

In a statement released shortly after the bill’s unanimous Senate passage on Dec. 19, Booker called it “an emotional and historic day.”

“For over a century, members of Congress have attempted to pass some version of a bill that would recognize lynching for what it is: a bias-motivated act of terror. And for more than a century, and more than 200 attempts, this body has failed,” Booker stated. “We have righted that wrong and taken corrective action that recognizes this stain on our country’s history.”

The bill notes that at least 4,742 people, mainly African-Americans, were reportedly lynched in the U.S. from 1882 to 1968.

Evangelical group wants gays removed from anti-lynching bill

Absolutely un-frickin-believable! What is to be gained from this blatant bigotry? Honestly, the Republican should just have "I am an asshole" tattooed on their foreheads.
 
Dec 2006
26,553
11,662
New Haven, CT
#7
That said, I have several problems with your proposal; First, I'd prefer religious groups stay out of politics. In many instances it violates their tax exempt status. Now you are pushing for more Christians to become involved in politics to stop assholes like the bigoted douchebags in the "Liberty Counsel". IMO, the best solution isn't to encourage more religious involvement in politics but to tighten up rules and enforcement regarding tax-exempt status of religious organizations. OTOH, I think you are more interested in lynching all Christians than in making the US a more just and fair nation.

Second, I'm against "hate crimes". Murder is murder. Lynching, multiple shootings, burning and being dragged behind a car make a murder more heinous, but it shouldn't matter the religion, gender, skin tone or any other factor either the victim or the murderers. If a friend and I are murdered by the KKK with him being black and me being white, why should the murderers be charged with extra crimes for his murder and not mine? Isn't that racist?

Lastly, I strongly support keeping government secular but the atheists who constantly demonize (<--note the irony) Christians (oddly, not Jews or Muslims) are part of the problem, not part of the solution.
A. I am totally flummoxed. I made no proposal. I have no idea what you're on about. I have long advocated for churches to lose tax exempt status for engaging in political actions. Religious GROUPS? THAT'S another ball of wax. Lobbying groups for other entities (oil, arts, insurance, medicine, etc.) are tax exempt. No reason a religious organization should be excluded from that group. But a church. That's a different story.

B. I'm in favor of hate crime legislation. I believe that people whose victimhood isn't covered by a hate crime law are just going to have to get over it. Hate crime laws are an assault on not only the immediate victim, but are used to instill fear, chaos, insecurity and self-doubt of entire communities. People just have to get over the "worth less than" route. It has nothing to do with worth more or less.

C. I am not an atheist, so I'm not going to go into all the reasons I think your last sentence has myriad presumptions and assumptions going on that are wrong.

D. For the record. This is a small forum and most of us have been around for along time and know each other. I'm a Jew who has converted to Christianity. Most people here know that. I'm NOT going into a long litany of my life's spiritual journey and why not all Christians are the Christians I am speaking about when discussing bigoted and ignorant Christian leaders, churches or organizations. I'm simply not doing it. For the same reason I do not condemn ALL right wing conservatives as fat orange turd Dear Leader Kool Ade suckers. But I do not feel the need to put quotes and explanations around every single thing I write to keep from having my words thrown back at me.
 
May 2018
5,676
3,681
Chicago
#9
The bigotry is easy to see. Anyone who tars all of one group for the actions of a very small minority is guilty of pushing a bigoted agenda. I've seen it in racists to use examples of gang-bangers in Chicago raping a woman in order to blame all black Americans. It's a strategy that promotes hate and divides Americans who seek to find peaceful, civil ways to resolve our nation's problems.

That said, I have several problems with your proposal; First, I'd prefer religious groups stay out of politics. In many instances it violates their tax exempt status. Now you are pushing for more Christians to become involved in politics to stop assholes like the bigoted douchebags in the "Liberty Counsel". IMO, the best solution isn't to encourage more religious involvement in politics but to tighten up rules and enforcement regarding tax-exempt status of religious organizations. OTOH, I think you are more interested in lynching all Christians than in making the US a more just and fair nation.

Second, I'm against "hate crimes". Murder is murder. Lynching, multiple shootings, burning and being dragged behind a car make a murder more heinous, but it shouldn't matter the religion, gender, skin tone or any other factor either the victim or the murderers. If a friend and I are murdered by the KKK with him being black and me being white, why should the murderers be charged with extra crimes for his murder and not mine? Isn't that racist?

Lastly, I strongly support keeping government secular but the atheists who constantly demonize (<--note the irony) Christians (oddly, not Jews or Muslims) are part of the problem, not part of the solution.
These assholes DESERVE to be demonized. They're evil! Calling out evil is not part of the problem. Evil people like these idiots are the problem.
 
Apr 2014
3,170
1,364
redacted
#10
A. I am totally flummoxed. I made no proposal. I have no idea what you're on about. I have long advocated for churches to lose tax exempt status for engaging in political actions. Religious GROUPS? THAT'S another ball of wax. Lobbying groups for other entities (oil, arts, insurance, medicine, etc.) are tax exempt. No reason a religious organization should be excluded from that group. But a church. That's a different story.

B. I'm in favor of hate crime legislation. I believe that people whose victimhood isn't covered by a hate crime law are just going to have to get over it. Hate crime laws are an assault on not only the immediate victim, but are used to instill fear, chaos, insecurity and self-doubt of entire communities. People just have to get over the "worth less than" route. It has nothing to do with worth more or less.

C. I am not an atheist, so I'm not going to go into all the reasons I think your last sentence has myriad presumptions and assumptions going on that are wrong.

D. For the record. This is a small forum and most of us have been around for along time and know each other. I'm a Jew who has converted to Christianity. Most people here know that. I'm NOT going into a long litany of my life's spiritual journey and why not all Christians are the Christians I am speaking about when discussing bigoted and ignorant Christian leaders, churches or organizations. I'm simply not doing it. For the same reason I do not condemn ALL right wing conservatives as fat orange turd Dear Leader Kool Ade suckers. But I do not feel the need to put quotes and explanations around every single thing I write to keep from having my words thrown back at me.
A. Untrue. The title of your thread is enough but the fact you posted an article without comment indicates you agree with the content of that article. Additionally your second post, post #3, indicates your feelings towards Christians.

B. A point where you and I can agree to disagree. I dislike special rules for special people. It's a bad precedent. You disagree. Fine.

C. Could have fooled me given your constant attacks on Christians. Regardless of what belief system you choose to label yourself, the fact remains you have a strong dislike for Christians. Why?

D. So you say. Actions speak louder than words and words matter.
 

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