Devil in the Details the Successful version of OBAMACARE Health Care Around the World: Why Dutch System, Similar to Obamacare, is Model for USA

Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#1
Health Care Around the World: Why Dutch System, Similar to Obamacare, is Model for USA | The UMHS Endeavour Health Care Around the World: Why Dutch System, Similar to Obamacare, is Model for USA

GO DUTCH: The Netherlands leads the world in Primary Care. Photo: By User: (WT-shared) Shoestring at wts wikivoyage [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons
Perhaps the U.S. health-care system should “go Dutch.”
President Obama’s Affordable Care Act has both fans and harsh critics, but the Dutch have been using a similar, less-confusing nationalized system since 2006 that lets people take advantage of private doctors, tax deductions, government subsidization and regulation, and flat-rate, affordable deductibles. A study released in late 2013 said the Netherlands offers the best health-care system in the European Union. The Netherlands was at the top of the annual Euro Health Consumer Index (EHCI), the metric that compares health-care systems in Europe. Particularly noteworthy is how the Dutch economy comes second only to the United States in spending for health care, according to a Commonwealth Fund report, and there are many parallels between the nationalized Netherlands system and Obamacare because “the Dutch approach combines mandatory universal health insurance with competition among private health insurers” (http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/In-the-Literature/2008/May/Universal-Mandatory-Health-Insurance-in-The-Netherlands–A-Model-for-the-United-States.aspx).
For the second installment of our Health Care Around the World series, the UMHS Endeavour looks at the fundamentals of Dutch health care, its similarities to Obamacare and what makes Dutch health plans better than Affordable Care Act plans in the USA. We will explore what America can learn from this European nation as we make adjustments to our new health-care system, for the benefit of all Americans and students from U.S. and international medical schools studying to become doctors.

Why ‘Managed Chaos’ Works in the Netherlands

European health official Arne Björnberg of Swedish NGO Health Consumer Powerhouse praised the Dutch system at a conference in Brussels in November 2013, saying all countries can learn from nationalized medicine in the Netherlands.
“The Netherlands has what we call ‘a chaos system’, meaning patients have a great degree of freedom from where to buy their health insurance to where they get their healthcare service. The difference between the Netherlands and other countries is that the chaos is managed. Healthcare decisions are being made in a dialogue between the patients and the healthcare professionals,” Mr. Björnberg said.
Following are facts about the Dutch system from the Commonwealth Fund and Euractiv.com, iAmsterdam.com and CNN.
Foundations of Dutch Health Care
100% of people in the Netherlands have a regular doctor.
Everyone pays a flat-rate annual deductible of approximately €170 euros ($235 U.S.), as opposed to the high, unaffordable deductibles of up to $8,000 annually on many Affordable Care Act plans in the States.
Average life expectancy in the Netherlands is 80 (compared to 78 in the USA).
From 2009 to 2013, the Netherlands health-care system scored above all other European nations regarding patient rights and information, accessibility, prevention and outcomes.
The Dutch government introduced mandatory health insurance for middle and low-income residents back in 1941, and people with higher incomes bought private insurance.
Passage of the Health Care Prices Act in 1982 authorized the Dutch government to control physicians’ fees and total revenues. “This legislation allowed the government, for example, to replace fee-for-service payments to hospital-based specialists with lump-sum payments to hospitals,” the Commonwealth Fund’s website explains.
The Health Insurance Act passed in 2006, after years of legislation for universal health coverage, requiring all who legally live or work in the Netherlands to buy health insurance from a private insurance company.
Insurers are required by Dutch law to accept applicants at a community-rated premium.
Plans are financed with individuals’ annual income-based contributions, and employers are required to compensate employees for the contributions.
Dutch citizens and residents are fined if they do not sign up for mandatory health insurance.
Premiums are not required for children under age 18.
About two-thirds of Dutch households receive an income-related subsidy from the government—a maximum of approximately $2,200 per household per year.
The income-based contributions are transferred to a Risk Equalization Fund, which compensates insurers for taking on high-risk enrollees. In addition, insurers can use tools to protect their interests. These include managed-care techniques, such as disease management.
What Health Insurance Companies Cover As Mandated By Dutch Government
• Medical care, including care provided by general practitioners, medical specialists and obstetricians.
• Hospital treatment.
• Most medications (individual insurance companies determine what medications are covered).
• Dental care up to the age of 18.
• Postnatal care.
• Limited physiotherapy, exercise therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietary advice.
• Help to stop smoking.
• Additional premiums through supplementary private insurance plans cover dental care for adults; additional physiotherapy; and other treatment not covered under basic health-care plans.
For more information on the Netherlands health-care system, visit Euractiv.com at The Netherlands has the best healthcare in the EU: Survey and iAmsterdam.com at http://www.iamsterdam.com/en-GB/living/family-health/healthcare-and-insurance/health-insurance
YouTube Video: CNN Report on Dutch Health Care vs. the USA
Health Care Around the World: Why Dutch System, Similar to Obamacare, is Model for USA | The UMHS Endeavour



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Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#5
Nope.. if you were winning you would not have had to begin the 2nd thread
to be honest i will tell you why i do that, if a thread gets long and my email gets a reply i click on it it takes me to the thread, but the repose gets lost in pages of respenses, i do that because i lost the thread, so i start a new one for clarity to be completely honest it does not have anything to do with a feeling i am losing in all honesty i get confused and lost and cant find the proper place to reply so a start a new thread,thats the ruth the whole truth and nothing but the truth..i have long threads they give me headaches waiding through them
 
Nov 2012
40,545
11,692
Lebanon, TN
#6
to be honest i will tell you why i do that, if a thread gets long and my email gets a reply i click on it it takes me to the thread, but the repose gets lost in pages of respenses, i do that because i lost the thread, so i start a new one for clarity to be completely honest it does not have anything to do with a feeling i am losing in all honesty i get confused and lost and cant find the proper place to reply so a start a new thread,thats the ruth the whole truth and nothing but the truth..i have long threads they give me headaches waiding through them
Whole Truth, The US (when you become sick the odds of you surviving is greater)

When you take the life expcectancy of those that ACCESS the healthcare system (not killed instantly in an accident) the US has the longest life expectancy in the world.

I will post the data again if you wish.. then you can start the 3rd thread.
 
Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#7
Whole Truth, The US (when you become sick the odds of you surviving is greater)

When you take the life expcectancy of those that ACCESS the healthcare system (not killed instantly in an accident) the US has the longest life expectancy in the world.

I will post the data again if you wish.. then you can start the 3rd thread.
thats a fake statistic, its just playing with numbers to try to deny that americans life much shorter life spans then europeans or canadians because our health care sux
 
Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#8
thats a fake statistic, its just playing with numbers to try to deny that americans life much shorter life spans then europeans or canadians because our health care sux
gun shot wounds and poor diet contribute but heart disease and other diseases and not accident they are preventable and universal systems are much better at preventing these, for example canda has stricter gun laws, canada makes it harder to get a driver license and consequantly have fewer auto accidents drug abuse and alcohol and tobacco kill less people because the health care system has programs to help people have bette diets and quit unhealthy habits prevention is cheaper than cure , so its not just the health care system but in the end our whole society is dangerous to human life too
 
Nov 2012
40,545
11,692
Lebanon, TN
#9
No, because he have a massive number of Automobile accidents that is the number one cause of death for children.
We live high Risk life
 
Nov 2012
40,545
11,692
Lebanon, TN
#10
gun shot wounds and poor diet contribute but heart disease and other diseases and not accident they are preventable and universal systems are much better at preventing these, for example canda has stricter gun laws, canada makes it harder to get a driver license and consequantly have fewer auto accidents drug abuse and alcohol and tobacco kill less people because the health care system has programs to help people have bette diets and quit unhealthy habits prevention is cheaper than cure , so its not just the health care system but in the end our whole society is dangerous to human life too
Yes 9,000 deaths caused by Gunshot wounds do play into it.

but 36,000 that die due to Car accidents, 38,000 people that are accidently poisoned, and 33,000 people that die from falls plays a MUCH GREATER roll in the cause of death.

FastStats
[QUOTE
All unintentional injury deaths
  • Number of deaths: 146,571
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 45.6
  • Cause of death rank: 4
Unintentional fall deaths
  • Number of deaths: 33,381
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 10.4
Motor vehicle traffic deaths
  • Number of deaths: 37,757
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 11.7
Unintentional poisoning deaths
  • Number of deaths: 47,478
  • Deaths per 100,000 population: 14.8
][/QUOTE]


Notice Firearms did not even make the list.

Heart attack survival rates in UK lagging behind other countries, report says

Using figures from 2011, Focus on: international healthcare comparisons, published by the Nuffield Trust and the Health Foundation says that ten per cent of heart attack patients over the age of 45 die after 30 days in the UK, compared to 8.2 per cent in Norway, 8.4 per cent in New Zealand, and 8.5 percent in Sweden
Now you say Heart Disease if you have an MI in the US your survival rate does not even make the list as the lowest


Notice the US did not make the list, notice WHICH COUNTRIES have the lowest survival lists.



Canada, the 11 worst, UK 4th worst, Netherlands 3rd worst.
 
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