dirty words...

Dec 2018
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#1
The seven dirty words are seven English-language words that American comedian George Carlin first listed in 1972 in his monologue "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television".[1] The words are: shi*, pis*, fuc*, cun*, coc*sucke*, mothe*fucke*, and ti*s

Seven dirty words - Wikipedia


fuco, fucare, fucavi, fucatus

verb

  • conjugation: 1st conjugation
Definitions:
  1. color
  2. dye
  3. paint



conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb

  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. bribe, suborn
  2. falsify
  3. pervert, corrupt, deprave
  4. seduce, tempt, beguile
 
Dec 2018
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#2
Fuc* is an obscene English-language word[1] which often refers to the act of sexual intercourse but is also commonly used as an intensifier or to denote disdain. While its origin is obscure, it is usually considered to be first attested to around 1475. In modern usage, the term "fuc*" and its derivatives (such as "fuc*er" and "fuc*ing") can be used as a noun, a verb, an adjective, an interjection or an adverb.

The word has probable cognates in other Germanic languages, such as German ficken (to fuc*)


Fuck - Wikipedia


fike (v.)
Middle English fyken "move about restlessly" (early 13c.), from Old Norse fikjask "to desire eagerly," fika (in fika sig upp "climb up nimbly," of a spider), probably from a general North Sea Germanic word related to the source of German ficken "to move about briskly." Later as "give trouble, vex" (1570s), a sense surviving especially in Scottish. Hence also fikery "vexatious trouble" (1823); fiky "causing trouble about trifles" (1768).

fike | Origin and meaning of fike by Online Etymology Dictionary
 
Dec 2018
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#3
offendo, offendere, offendi, offensus
verb

  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
Definitions:
  1. displease/annoy/vex
  2. offend, give offense (to)
  3. trouble/upset, hurt (feelings)


obfendo, obfendere, obfendi, obfensus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
Definitions:
  1. displease/annoy/vex
  2. offend, give offense (to)
  3. trouble/upset, hurt (feelings)

cura, curae


noun
  • declension: 1st declension
  • gender: feminine
Definitions:
  1. attention, care, pains, zeal
  2. concern, worry, anxiety, trouble
  3. cure, treatment


pungo, pungere, pupugi, punctus


verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. jab/poke
  2. mark with points/pricks
  3. prick, puncture
  4. sting (insect)
  5. vex/trouble


opera, operae

noun
  • declension: 1st declension
  • gender: feminine
Definitions:
  1. aid
  2. service, effort/trouble
  3. work, care
  4. [dare operam => pay attention to]



fike (v.)
Middle English fyken "move about restlessly" (early 13c.), from Old Norse fikjask "to desire eagerly," fika (in fika sig upp "climb up nimbly," of a spider), probably from a general North Sea Germanic word related to the source of German ficken "to move about briskly." Later as "give trouble, vex" (1570s), a sense surviving especially in Scottish. Hence also fikery "vexatious trouble" (1823); fiky "causing trouble about trifles" (1768).

(sounds like a 'thief')
 
Dec 2018
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#4
vanidicus, vanidici

noun
  • declension: 2nd declension
  • gender: masculine
Definitions:
  1. liar

rumpo, rumpere, rupi, ruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
Definitions:
  1. break
  2. destroy


conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. damage/ruin, undo
  2. destroy/deface
  3. digest
  4. infect
  5. spoil/rot
  6. taint/contaminate

conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. bribe, suborn
  2. falsify
  3. pervert, corrupt, deprave
  4. seduce, tempt, beguile
 
Dec 2018
1,442
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#5
United States obscenity law deals with the regulation or suppression of what is considered obscenity. In the United States, discussion of obscenity revolves around what constitutes pornography and of censorship, but also raises issues of freedom of speech and of the press, otherwise protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Issues of obscenity arise at federal and state levels. The States have a direct interest in public morality and have responsibility in relation to criminal law matters, including the punishment for the production and sale of obscene materials. State laws operate only within the jurisdiction of each state, and there are a wide differences in such laws. The federal government is involved in the issue indirectly, by making it an offense to distribute obscene materials through the post, to broadcast it,[1] as well as in relation to importation of such materials.

Most obscenity cases in the United States in the past century have revolved around images and films, but there have also been many cases that dealt with textual works as well, most infamously that of the 18th century novel Fanny Hill. Because censorship laws enacted to combat obscenity restrict freedom of expression, crafting a legal definition of obscenity presents a civil liberties issue.

United States obscenity law - Wikipedia


An obscenity is any utterance or act that strongly offends the prevalent morality of the time. It is derived from the Latin obscaena a cognate of the Ancient Greek root skene, because some potentially offensive content, such as murder or sex, was depicted offstage in classical drama.

Obscenity - Wikipedia


Obscenity and 'fike' in progressions:

fike (v.)
Middle English fyken "move about restlessly" (early 13c.), from Old Norse fikjask "to desire eagerly," fika (in fika sig upp "climb up nimbly," of a spider), probably from a general North Sea Germanic word related to the source of German ficken "to move about briskly." Later as "give trouble, vex" (1570s), a sense surviving especially in Scottish. Hence also fikery "vexatious trouble" (1823); fiky "causing trouble about trifles" (1768).
 
Dec 2018
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#6
Definition of rump. 1a : the upper rounded part of the hindquarters of a quadruped mammal. b : buttocks. c : the sacral or dorsal part of the posterior end of a bird.

Definition of RUMP

conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. damage/ruin, undo
  2. destroy/deface
  3. digest
  4. infect
  5. spoil/rot
  6. taint/contaminate

conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. bribe, suborn
  2. falsify
  3. pervert, corrupt, deprave
  4. seduce, tempt, beguile

con-
word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; it is the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations (such as costar), co- tends to be used where Latin would use con-.


conrumpo


rumpo, rumpere, rupi, ruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
Definitions:
  1. break
  2. destroy

Fuc* is an obscene English-language word[1] which often refers to the act of sexual intercourse

Obscene maybe because it destroys the 'love making' idea, hence;

conrumpo, conrumpere, conrupi, conruptus

verb
  • conjugation: 3rd conjugation
  • voice: transitive
Definitions:
  1. bribe, suborn
  2. falsify
  3. pervert, corrupt, deprave
  4. seduce, tempt, beguile

obscene (adj.)
1590s, "offensive to the senses, or to taste and refinement," from Middle French obscène (16c.), from Latin obscenus "offensive," especially to modesty, originally "boding ill, inauspicious," of unknown origin; perhaps from ob "in front of" (see ob-) + caenum "filth." Meaning "offensive to modesty or decency" is attested from 1590s. Legally, in U.S., it hinged on "whether to the average person, applying contemporary community standards, the dominant theme of the material taken as a whole appeals to a prurient interest." [Justice William Brennan, "Roth v. United States," June 24, 1957]; refined in 1973 by "Miller v. California":



The basic guidelines for the trier of fact must be: (a) whether 'the average person, applying contemporary community standards' would find that the work, taken as a whole, appeals to the prurient interest, (b) whether the work depicts or describes, in a patently offensive way, sexual conduct specifically defined by the applicable state law; and (c) whether the work, taken as a whole, lacks serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value.​
Most obscenity cases in the United States in the past century have revolved around images and films, but there have also been many cases that dealt with textual works as well, most infamously that of the 18th century novel Fanny Hill. Because censorship laws enacted to combat obscenity restrict freedom of expression, crafting a legal definition of obscenity presents a civil liberties issue.​
 
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Dec 2018
1,442
19
U.S
#7
Since 1857, a series of obscenity laws known as the Obscene Publications Acts have governed what can be published in England and Wales. The classic definition of criminal obscenity is if it "tends to deprave and corrupt," stated in 1868 by Lord Justice Cockburn, in Regina v. Hicklin, now known as the Hicklin test.

Obscene Publications Acts - Wikipedia


The Hicklin test is a legal test for obscenity established by the English case Regina v. Hicklin (1868). At issue was the statutory interpretation of the word "obscene" in the Obscene Publications Act 1857, which authorized the destruction of obscene books.[1] The court held that all material tending "to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences" was obscene, regardless of its artistic or literary merit.

Chief Justice Cockburn, on April 29, 1868, reinstated the order of the lower court, holding that Scott's intention was immaterial if the publication was obscene in fact. Justice Cockburn reasoned that the Obscene Publications Act allowed banning of a publication if it had a "tendency ... to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences, and into whose hands a publication of this sort may fall."[5] Hicklin therefore allowed portions of a suspect work to be judged independently of context. If any portion of a work was deemed obscene, the entire work could be outlawed.


Adoption of obscenity laws in the United States was largely due to the efforts of Anthony Comstock. Comstock's intense lobbying led to the passage in 1873 of an anti-obscenity statute known as the Comstock Act. Comstock was appointed postal inspector to enforce the new law.[6] Twenty-four states passed similar prohibitions on materials distributed within the states.[7] The law criminalized not only sexually explicit material, but also material dealing with birth control and abortion.[8] Although lower courts in the U.S. had used the Hicklin standard sporadically since 1868, it was not until 1879, when prominent federal judge Samuel Blatchford upheld the obscenity conviction of D. M. Bennett using Hicklin, that the constitutionality of the Comstock Law became firmly established.[9] In 1896, the Supreme Court in Rosen v. United States, 161 U.S. 29 (1896), adopted the Hicklin test as the appropriate test of obscenity.[10]

However, in 1933, the Hicklin test ended on the federal level when, in U.S. v. One Book Entitled “Ulysses”, 72 F.2d 705 (2d Cir. 1933), Judge John Woolsey found Ulysses to not be obscene. Avoiding the Hicklin test, he said instead that in evaluating obscenity, a court must consider (1) the work as a whole, not just selected passages that could be interpreted out of context; (2) the effect on an average, rather than the most susceptible person; and (3) contemporary community standards. Finally, adults could read something without worrying if it would corrupt a child.[11]

Finally, in 1957, the Supreme Court ruled in Roth v. United States, 354 U.S. 476 (1957) that the Hicklin test was inappropriate.[12] In Roth, Justice Brennan, writing for the majority, noted that some American courts had adopted the Hicklin standard, but that later decisions more commonly relied upon the question of "whether to the average person, applying contemporary community standards, the dominant theme of the material taken as a whole appeals to prurient interest."[13] This Roth test became essentially the new definition of obscenity in the United States.

Hicklin test - Wikipedia


Definition of prurient

: marked by or arousing an immoderate or unwholesome interest or desireespecially : marked by, arousing, or appealing to sexual desire


In Roth, Justice Brennan, writing for the majority, noted that some American courts had adopted the Hicklin standard, but that later decisions more commonly relied upon the question of "whether to the average person, applying contemporary community standards, the dominant theme of the material taken as a whole appeals to prurient interest."


Would have had reading a book of sexual 'freedom' among the masses and in public have appealed to prurient interests even if there was no sexual 'dominant' theme to the 'whole' of the material?
 
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Dec 2018
1,442
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U.S
#8
Prurient interests?




A brutally authentic tale of crime and the law in Hispanic Los Angeles. Mingling commerce, witchcraft, mysterious taboos, love and redemption, this intriguing mystery unveils the seductiveness of L.A.'s strange alliances, as a court-appointed private investigator takes on the case of two Cuban "marielitos"--followers of the voodoo-like Santeria cult--who are accused of a vicious massacre.


When did witchcraft, mysterious taboos, seduction, voodoo-like Santeria cults, vicious massacres become 'non-obscene'?
 
Dec 2018
1,442
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#9
Los Angeles/Population

4 million (2017)





Los Angeles - Wikipedia



Under 5 years 251,097 - 6.6% of total population
5 to 9 years 231,528 - 6.1% of total population
10 to 14 years 237,462 - 6.3% of total population

15 to 19 years 274,373 - 7.2% of total population

Of all 'races' in Los Angeles.

26.2%

American FactFinder - Results


In law, a minor is a person under a certain age, usually the age of majority, which legally demarcates childhood from adulthood. The age of majority depends upon jurisdiction and application, but it is generally 18. Minor may also be used in contexts that are unconnected to the overall age of majority. For example, the drinking age in the United States is usually 21, and younger people are sometimes called minors in the context of alcohol law, even if they are at least 18.[1][2] The term underage often refers to those under the age of majority, but it may also refer to persons under a certain age limit, such as the drinking age, smoking age, age of consent, marriageable age, driving age, voting age, etc. Such age limits are often different from the age of majority.

Minor (law) - Wikipedia


Obscenity laws, minors, adults and them needing to 'live' among one another.





Originally published: 1991​



A brutally authentic tale of crime and the law in Hispanic Los Angeles. Mingling commerce, witchcraft, mysterious taboos, love and redemption, this intriguing mystery unveils the seductiveness of L.A.'s strange alliances, as a court-appointed private investigator takes on the case of two Cuban "marielitos"--followers of the voodoo-like Santeria cult--who are accused of a vicious massacre.

Hispanic or Latino of any race: 48.5%
 
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Dec 2018
1,442
19
U.S
#10
Adoption of obscenity laws in the United States was largely due to the efforts of Anthony Comstock. Comstock's intense lobbying led to the passage in 1873 of an anti-obscenity statute known as the Comstock Act. Comstock was appointed postal inspector to enforce the new law.[6] Twenty-four states passed similar prohibitions on materials distributed within the states.[7] The law criminalized not only sexually explicit material, but also material dealing with birth control and abortion.[8] Although lower courts in the U.S. had used the Hicklin standard sporadically since 1868, it was not until 1879, when prominent federal judge Samuel Blatchford upheld the obscenity conviction of D. M. Bennett using Hicklin, that the constitutionality of the Comstock Law became firmly established.[9] In 1896, the Supreme Court in Rosen v. United States, 161 U.S. 29 (1896), adopted the Hicklin test as the appropriate test of obscenity.[10]

However, in 1933, the Hicklin test ended on the federal level when, in U.S. v. One Book Entitled “Ulysses”, 72 F.2d 705 (2d Cir. 1933), Judge John Woolsey found Ulysses to not be obscene.







Angelus Temple is a Pentecostal megachurch of the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel in the Echo Park district of Los Angeles, California, United States.

The church was founded in 1923 by Aimee Semple McPherson.[1] Aimee Semple McPherson chose Los Angeles as the location of the Temple after receiving a vision of the California dream, "a little home in Los Angeles," as she prayed beside her ill daughter, Roberta. When she found the lot nearby Echo Lake, she paused silently and then said, "This is the place God would have us build."


Angelus Temple - Wikipedia


in U.S. v. One Book Entitled “Ulysses”, 72 F.2d 705 (2d Cir. 1933), Judge John Woolsey found Ulysses to not be obscene.

United States v. One Book Called Ulysses was a December 6, 1933 decision by the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York in a case dealing with freedom of expression. At issue was whether James Joyce's novel Ulysses was obscene. In deciding it was not, Judge John M. Woolsey opened the door to importation and publication of serious works of literature that used coarse language or involved sexual subjects.

The trial court's decision was upheld by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which confirmed that offensive language in a literary work is not obscene where it does not promote lust. But Judge Woolsey's trial court opinion is now more widely known, and often cited as an erudite and discerning affirmation of literary free expression.

United States v. One Book Called Ulysses - Wikipedia

Psalm 96:8 "Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name: bring an offering, and come into his courts."
Psalm 29:2 "Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name; worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness."


Los Angeles 1930 was still U.S. Why do some say that Los Angeles in 1930 was 'not different' than it is today? That 'nothing' has changed? That the same Constitution and the same lives of today are/were the same as the one(s) in 1930?
 
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