Election Day Holiday? GOP says No Thanks

Dec 2015
14,187
13,096
Arizona
#1
Ever since I read that the GOP doesn't want an election day holiday I've been stymied. Hmmm....why would anyone be opposed to that idea? Don't we want Americans to vote? Shouldn't we make it easier for everyone? Why not a paid holiday? Why does it have to be a Tuesday? In November?
History. There's history involved and it goes all the way back to 1845--YEP--we are expected to "honor" a tradition which began in 1845. Why you ask? The simple answer is...FARMERS. (I bet you didn't get that!)
The answer lies with America's 19th-century farmers and our agrarian society. Americans first began the custom of weekday voting in 1845, when Congress passed a federal law designating the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November as Election Day. ... because Tuesday did not interfere with the Sabbath or with market day, which was on Wednesday in many towns. So logical--why didn't we think of that?

So now, let's explore WHY the Grand OLD Party rejects the idea of a holiday to vote.
H.R. 1: For the People Act is something Mitch McConnell likes to call the "Democrat Politician Act" because SOMEHOW a holiday to vote is a "power grab that's smelling more and more like what it is." A power grab? To vote? Anyway we want?

But here's what we didn't know. There's more to H.R. 1 than a proposed holiday. The bill also would have prohibited the purging of voter rolls, which was extremely controversial in Georgia this year as the Republican candidate for governor -- Brian Kemp, then the secretary of state -- sought to purge the rolls, which coincidentally could have helped him on Election Day. The courts got involved in the voter roll issue. Kemp won the election. (See...it's okay to purge the rolls if you are a Republican!!? But what if a Democrat decided to try that?)
AND just TRY to guess WHAT other goody is included in H.R. 1....go ahead. Try. Did you guess *ending* gerrymandering?? Both parties have employed it to protect members of Congress, but Republicans have controlled more state legislatures and have used it to greater effect.
But there's more. The majority of FEDERAL WORKERS (who would get the day off) are DEMOCRATS! Is this beginning to make sense?
AND (here's the icing): A new Pew study projects the portion of nonwhite voters will grow to a third in 2020 and Latinos could overtake African-Americans as the largest nonwhite voting bloc. They voted 66% in favor of Clinton in 2016.
The national demographics have been moving against Republicans for some time, but they have been able to maintain the majority of power in Washington despite that.
The bill Democrats unveiled, with its assault on gerrymandering and enticements to bring more voters to the polls represented a challenge to that control Republicans have been able to maintain.
This is pathetic to the bone.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/31/politics/election-day-holiday-republicans/index.html
 
Dec 2016
4,411
2,282
Canada
#4
When Newt and the boys took over Congress in 94, they rode in with a "Contract With America" that was supposed to seriously propose those term limits along with other proposed reforms, so what happened? Why did the GOP drop the demand for term limits so fast? And why did so many new "contract" Republicans also forget about their term limits promise? As I recall, only one or two honored the pledge personally and retired when their agreed limit was up.

So, it's all been done before and vanished without a trace. Even back in the 90's, it was likely nothing more than a smokescreen to mask the impacts that growing amounts of campaign donations were having on all levels of government...but nobody wanted the gravy train to end!
The only reform that really counts is one that a minority of REAL progressive Democrats have made not to take corporate financing...especially from the banks, arms merchants and oil, gas and coal companies.
 
Dec 2016
4,411
2,282
Canada
#5
Ever since I read that the GOP doesn't want an election day holiday I've been stymied. Hmmm....why would anyone be opposed to that idea? Don't we want Americans to vote? Shouldn't we make it easier for everyone? Why not a paid holiday? Why does it have to be a Tuesday? In November?
History. There's history involved and it goes all the way back to 1845--YEP--we are expected to "honor" a tradition which began in 1845. Why you ask? The simple answer is...FARMERS. (I bet you didn't get that!)
The answer lies with America's 19th-century farmers and our agrarian society. Americans first began the custom of weekday voting in 1845, when Congress passed a federal law designating the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November as Election Day. ... because Tuesday did not interfere with the Sabbath or with market day, which was on Wednesday in many towns. So logical--why didn't we think of that?

So now, let's explore WHY the Grand OLD Party rejects the idea of a holiday to vote.
H.R. 1: For the People Act is something Mitch McConnell likes to call the "Democrat Politician Act" because SOMEHOW a holiday to vote is a "power grab that's smelling more and more like what it is." A power grab? To vote? Anyway we want?

But here's what we didn't know. There's more to H.R. 1 than a proposed holiday. The bill also would have prohibited the purging of voter rolls, which was extremely controversial in Georgia this year as the Republican candidate for governor -- Brian Kemp, then the secretary of state -- sought to purge the rolls, which coincidentally could have helped him on Election Day. The courts got involved in the voter roll issue. Kemp won the election. (See...it's okay to purge the rolls if you are a Republican!!? But what if a Democrat decided to try that?)
AND just TRY to guess WHAT other goody is included in H.R. 1....go ahead. Try. Did you guess *ending* gerrymandering?? Both parties have employed it to protect members of Congress, but Republicans have controlled more state legislatures and have used it to greater effect.
But there's more. The majority of FEDERAL WORKERS (who would get the day off) are DEMOCRATS! Is this beginning to make sense?
AND (here's the icing): A new Pew study projects the portion of nonwhite voters will grow to a third in 2020 and Latinos could overtake African-Americans as the largest nonwhite voting bloc. They voted 66% in favor of Clinton in 2016.
The national demographics have been moving against Republicans for some time, but they have been able to maintain the majority of power in Washington despite that.
The bill Democrats unveiled, with its assault on gerrymandering and enticements to bring more voters to the polls represented a challenge to that control Republicans have been able to maintain.
This is pathetic to the bone.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/31/politics/election-day-holiday-republicans/index.html
Naturally the GOP doesn't want an election day holiday! Too many of the wrong people would be able to vote...like people who have to work long hours for low pay.
 
Nov 2012
39,602
11,531
Lebanon, TN
#6
Ever since I read that the GOP doesn't want an election day holiday I've been stymied. Hmmm....why would anyone be opposed to that idea? Don't we want Americans to vote? Shouldn't we make it easier for everyone? Why not a paid holiday? Why does it have to be a Tuesday? In November?
History. There's history involved and it goes all the way back to 1845--YEP--we are expected to "honor" a tradition which began in 1845. Why you ask? The simple answer is...FARMERS. (I bet you didn't get that!)
The answer lies with America's 19th-century farmers and our agrarian society. Americans first began the custom of weekday voting in 1845, when Congress passed a federal law designating the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November as Election Day. ... because Tuesday did not interfere with the Sabbath or with market day, which was on Wednesday in many towns. So logical--why didn't we think of that?

So now, let's explore WHY the Grand OLD Party rejects the idea of a holiday to vote.
H.R. 1: For the People Act is something Mitch McConnell likes to call the "Democrat Politician Act" because SOMEHOW a holiday to vote is a "power grab that's smelling more and more like what it is." A power grab? To vote? Anyway we want?

But here's what we didn't know. There's more to H.R. 1 than a proposed holiday. The bill also would have prohibited the purging of voter rolls, which was extremely controversial in Georgia this year as the Republican candidate for governor -- Brian Kemp, then the secretary of state -- sought to purge the rolls, which coincidentally could have helped him on Election Day. The courts got involved in the voter roll issue. Kemp won the election. (See...it's okay to purge the rolls if you are a Republican!!? But what if a Democrat decided to try that?)
AND just TRY to guess WHAT other goody is included in H.R. 1....go ahead. Try. Did you guess *ending* gerrymandering?? Both parties have employed it to protect members of Congress, but Republicans have controlled more state legislatures and have used it to greater effect.
But there's more. The majority of FEDERAL WORKERS (who would get the day off) are DEMOCRATS! Is this beginning to make sense?
AND (here's the icing): A new Pew study projects the portion of nonwhite voters will grow to a third in 2020 and Latinos could overtake African-Americans as the largest nonwhite voting bloc. They voted 66% in favor of Clinton in 2016.
The national demographics have been moving against Republicans for some time, but they have been able to maintain the majority of power in Washington despite that.
The bill Democrats unveiled, with its assault on gerrymandering and enticements to bring more voters to the polls represented a challenge to that control Republicans have been able to maintain.
This is pathetic to the bone.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/31/politics/election-day-holiday-republicans/index.html
Several GOP States passed term limits, Robert Byrd, D WVA sued and had them overturned.
 
Mar 2013
8,980
9,707
Middle Tennessee
#7
When Newt and the boys took over Congress in 94, they rode in with a "Contract With America" that was supposed to seriously propose those term limits along with other proposed reforms, so what happened? Why did the GOP drop the demand for term limits so fast? And why did so many new "contract" Republicans also forget about their term limits promise? As I recall, only one or two honored the pledge personally and retired when their agreed limit was up.

So, it's all been done before and vanished without a trace. Even back in the 90's, it was likely nothing more than a smokescreen to mask the impacts that growing amounts of campaign donations were having on all levels of government...but nobody wanted the gravy train to end!
The only reform that really counts is one that a minority of REAL progressive Democrats have made not to take corporate financing...especially from the banks, arms merchants and oil, gas and coal companies.

Power corrupts. Absolute power, corrupts absolutely.

Typical tactic. Good old banana republic politics. The government in power becomes corrupt, uses all sorts of unimaginable and evil tactics to retain power. Then along comes a revolutionary who leads the people into revolt and overthrows the evil government. Only once they're in power wind up resorting to the exact same unimaginable and evil tactics employed by the previous administration. Viva la Revolution !!

Newt's contract with America was the equivalent of a coup to overthrow a decades of mostly democratic majority congresses. Only to toss that contract once they had won their objective. Their primary object became to retain their power. Two years into the Obama presidency, the country was still reeling from the housing market crash. Unemployment, was still double digit. Millions were losing their houses. The stock market was slowly recovering but was still on a roller coaster of a ride.

And Mitch McConnell said the Republican party's "first and most important goal was to make Obama a one term president".
 
Likes: imaginethat
Mar 2013
8,980
9,707
Middle Tennessee
#10
Several GOP States passed term limits, Robert Byrd, D WVA sued and had them overturned.
AK, AZ, CA, CO, FL, ID, ME, MA, MI, MO, MT, NE, NV, ND, OH, OK, OR, SD, WA, and WY. The legislature in New Hampshire and Utah passed laws limiting the
tenure of their Members of Congress.

Not all the states were GOP states and the actual lawsuit that overturned their laws came out of Arkansas !!!! Had nothing to do with Robert Byrd.
 
Likes: imaginethat