Et Tu, Jim Mattis?

Dec 2015
13,242
12,088
Arizona
#1
If almost any other member of President Trump’s cabinet had sought to justify his deployment of thousands of troops to the border by talking about the threat of Mexican revolutionaries more than a century ago, it probably would have sailed right past me. Hyperbole, hysteria and convenient invocations of history are the native tongue of this administration, whose members were either fluent in it beforehand or picked it up quickly.

But Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who recently evoked that specter, was supposed to speak a better language. He was known to be a saner sort — not just the proverbial adult in the room but the conscience amid the corruption and the barricade against disaster. I like to think that millions of American parents instructed their children to expand their bedtime prayers. Watch over Mommy. Protect Daddy. And don’t let anything bad happen to General Mattis.
Well, something bad happened to General Mattis.
On Wednesday he traveled to southernmost Texas to visit those troops. The trip was a good and necessary thing. President Trump, for all his lip service to venerating the military, doesn’t go out of his way to mingle with or pay tribute to servicemen and servicewomen; somebody has to make them feel appreciated and important. That was Mattis’s noble goal. He was trying to assure them that if they missed Thanksgiving, it wouldn’t be for naught.
But that wasn’t doable without dabbling in deception, because the propping up of this president requires it.
In Mattis’s case, it required Pancho Villa.
Pancho Villa was a Mexican revolutionary who, along with hundreds of armed followers, attacked an American border town, burning houses and killing people, before retreating back into Mexico, where President Woodrow Wilson ordered him pursued. Mattis revisited that episode in remarks to reporters on his way to Texas.

“I think many of you are aware that President Wilson 100 years ago — a little over 100 years ago — deployed the U.S. Army to the southwest border,” he said. “The threat then was Pancho Villa’s troops, a revolutionary, raiding across the border into the United States — New Mexico — in 1916.”

Interesting. Also irrelevant. There’s no Pancho Villa in the caravan of migrants proceeding north through Mexico. Trump has admitted as much. He didn’t say so explicitly, but it’s beyond obvious in his near-total silence about the situation since the midterms.

Before Election Day, the caravan was a Trojan Horse for jihadists. It was an “invasion” of such menace that soldiers might have to respond to any rocks thrown by the invaders with bullets. Trump used such overheated imagery in an effort to activate his base. To lend credibility to this scaremongering, he dispatched the troops.

Now they’re laying concertina wire when they’re not twiddling their thumbs, and Trump has pretty much stopped mentioning the supposed enemy heading their way. Just like that — poof! — the caravan ceased to be an emergency. Apart from a rare, terse reappearance on Friday night, it exited his tweets.

More here: Opinion | E Tu Jim Mattis?

My advice: Don't stay too long, Jim.Your Trump side is showing. Follow Nikki Haley's lead.
 
Likes: Hollywood
Nov 2012
8,885
3,593
Chicago
#2
If almost any other member of President Trump’s cabinet had sought to justify his deployment of thousands of troops to the border by talking about the threat of Mexican revolutionaries more than a century ago, it probably would have sailed right past me. Hyperbole, hysteria and convenient invocations of history are the native tongue of this administration, whose members were either fluent in it beforehand or picked it up quickly.

But Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, who recently evoked that specter, was supposed to speak a better language. He was known to be a saner sort — not just the proverbial adult in the room but the conscience amid the corruption and the barricade against disaster. I like to think that millions of American parents instructed their children to expand their bedtime prayers. Watch over Mommy. Protect Daddy. And don’t let anything bad happen to General Mattis.
Well, something bad happened to General Mattis.
On Wednesday he traveled to southernmost Texas to visit those troops. The trip was a good and necessary thing. President Trump, for all his lip service to venerating the military, doesn’t go out of his way to mingle with or pay tribute to servicemen and servicewomen; somebody has to make them feel appreciated and important. That was Mattis’s noble goal. He was trying to assure them that if they missed Thanksgiving, it wouldn’t be for naught.
But that wasn’t doable without dabbling in deception, because the propping up of this president requires it.
In Mattis’s case, it required Pancho Villa.
Pancho Villa was a Mexican revolutionary who, along with hundreds of armed followers, attacked an American border town, burning houses and killing people, before retreating back into Mexico, where President Woodrow Wilson ordered him pursued. Mattis revisited that episode in remarks to reporters on his way to Texas.

“I think many of you are aware that President Wilson 100 years ago — a little over 100 years ago — deployed the U.S. Army to the southwest border,” he said. “The threat then was Pancho Villa’s troops, a revolutionary, raiding across the border into the United States — New Mexico — in 1916.”

Interesting. Also irrelevant. There’s no Pancho Villa in the caravan of migrants proceeding north through Mexico. Trump has admitted as much. He didn’t say so explicitly, but it’s beyond obvious in his near-total silence about the situation since the midterms.

Before Election Day, the caravan was a Trojan Horse for jihadists. It was an “invasion” of such menace that soldiers might have to respond to any rocks thrown by the invaders with bullets. Trump used such overheated imagery in an effort to activate his base. To lend credibility to this scaremongering, he dispatched the troops.

Now they’re laying concertina wire when they’re not twiddling their thumbs, and Trump has pretty much stopped mentioning the supposed enemy heading their way. Just like that — poof! — the caravan ceased to be an emergency. Apart from a rare, terse reappearance on Friday night, it exited his tweets.

More here: Opinion | E Tu Jim Mattis?

My advice: Don't stay too long, Jim.Your Trump side is showing. Follow Nikki Haley's lead.
You forgot your quotes, I don't believe you wrote that article.:think: However it's a good opinion piece.:)
 

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