EV's not suited for police cars

RNG

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Apr 2013
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Is sounds more like software issues due to safety features for Joe Average drivers.
 

Marcus Livius

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Sep 2017
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Is sounds more like software issues due to safety features for Joe Average drivers.
Software has nothing to do with this:

The vehicles’ range is a central issue as well.

The battery reserves of the cars, which already take an inconveniently long time to charge, can’t even make it through a single shift without the need to be plugged back in.
And I'm assuming that does not even involve a chase or rapid response.
 
Mar 2013
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Most “police” cars are purpose built for police duty. As such they often lack features found on civilian units and or have those features controlled by the driver. They also come with equipment not found on civilian units. So yes some of their complaints are entirely “software” issues. If the manufacturers ever intended those vehicles to be used in that manner they would offer them with a list of features that could be added or subtracted to suit the department’s needs. Seriously? An i3 or a Leaf as a “pursuit” vehicle??? That’s hysterical.

It sounds like they just went out and bought civilian models and pressed them into service. They would, in all likely hood, have found the bread and butter versions of any modern car just as compromised as the EV save the recharge issue which anyone with three brains cells should have seen coming 10 miles out.

You wouldn’t take a Ferrari off roading or mud bogging and you wouldn’t take your jacked up F250 to the local road race track day.

It sounds like they’re blaming the vehicles for not performing a job they weren’t designed or equipped to do.
 
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The biggest problem my son the cop brought up is the inability to use them in static situations. Road blocks and other situations require the unit to sit in one place for long periods of time with the engine running and lights on etc. Also the units are "relay" stations for their communications. The radio on the officer is linked to the unit which then relays it on the net to the dispatchers. If that car goes dead the officers cannot communicate. They also have their networked computers running on the data net provided by the unit.
 
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Marcus Livius

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From the link:
Let me try this another way.

Software cannot solve the battery capacity which is affecting the range and endurance of the vehicle which is a central issue from the article. which I will quote again:
The vehicles’ range is a central issue as well.

The battery reserves of the cars, which already take an inconveniently long time to charge, can’t even make it through a single shift without the need to be plugged back in.
To improve conducive driving, the automatic and regenerative braking needs to be overridden, which will FURTHER REDUCE the range of electric vehicles as it relies on the brake system as recharge the battery. If you had never driven an electric vehicle before, each time you take your foot of the throttle, it automatically applies brakes. Law enforcement officers are trained to drive aggressively, while common before are taught to drive defensively. Police likes to ride up your butt with theirr vehicle. Maybe software changes can overcome the automatic braking due to proximity sensors, but removing the regenerative braking will further reduce range which already is grave concern, nor will it change the resulting INCONVENIENTLY LONG TIME TO CHARGE - again as declared by a statement in the article. An electric patrol car will be down TOO long and cannot serve two consecutive shifts or a single extended shift, let alone a single normal uneventful shift.
 
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imaginethat

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Oct 2010
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Let me try this another way.

Software cannot solve the battery capacity which is affecting the range and endurance of the vehicle which is a central issue from the article. which I will quote again:

To improve conducive driving, the automatic and regenerative braking needs to be overridden, which will FURTHER REDUCE the range of electric vehicles as it relies on the brake system as recharge the battery. If you had never driven an electric vehicle before, each time you take your foot of the throttle, it automatically applies brakes. Law enforcement officers are trained to drive aggressively, while common before are taught to drive defensively. Police likes to ride up your butt with theirr vehicle. Maybe software changes can overcome the automatic braking due to proximity sensors, but removing the regenerative braking will further reduce range which already is grave concern, nor will it change the resulting INCONVENIENTLY LONG TIME TO CHARGE - again as declared by a statement in the article. An electric patrol car will be down TOO long and cannot serve two consecutive shifts or a single extended shift, let alone a single normal uneventful shift.
More powerful engines are standard in gasoline-powered patrol cars.

Put more powerful battery packs in electric-powered patrol cars.

Frankly, I don't care whether Police go to EVs right away, but it's funny to see raw resistance to technological change.

Also, the elephant in the room is that EVs aren't suited for police us according to some folks ... because those damned liberals like EVs. Don't any one of you folks deny that, please.
 

Marcus Livius

Former Staff
Sep 2017
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More powerful engines are standard in gasoline-powered patrol cars.

Put more powerful battery packs in electric-powered patrol cars.

Frankly, I don't care whether Police go to EVs right away, but it's funny to see raw resistance to technological change.

Also, the elephant in the room is that EVs aren't suited for police us according to some folks ... because those damned liberals like EVs. Don't any one of you folks deny that, please.
I'm not resistant to technological change. If I was, I would be reading a Bible next to a wood fire and a whale-oil lamp right now sitting on a solid wood chair crafted entirely by non-electrical hand tools while the womenfolk are washing my tunic and beeches in a wooden tub by rubbing them with a bar of hand soap made mostly of lard against a wooden washboard.

I would be the first to buy an electric vehicle once it meets my requirements and price range. Besides for computers, electronics, and airbags which all cars have, the greatest money pit for combustion engine cars are related to smog compliance, from initial air intake down to the end of the tailpipe.

People complain that the life expectancy of an EV is 100K miles. Well, so is a catalytic converter, the two or more oxygen sensors, all the evap values and sensors, the air intake sensor for EACH cylinder. Lord knows how many oil changes and filters, radiators, and fuel injection issues, at least one fuel pump that goes into to equation that no one complaining about batteries ever bring up. Need I go on?

There is a place for EV as of now for some people, but not all, and at this moment while there may be a place for EV for police depts, it does not appear to be a PATROL vehicle. Many PD's have purchased EV's, but not for use for patrol, they primarily for such things as administrators/outreach programs/crime scene workers/cold case detectives/etc.

More powerful battery packs for patrol cars? What does that even mean? The car is designed for a particular voltage. If you mean batteries that can store more energy and for a longer period of time, what is best is already installed. Do you mean additional batteries? Where are they going to safely put it and not have to go through crash and safety evaluations again and not further compromise the mission of the police patrol car?

Have you actually been in a modern day police car? The reason while so many US PD's went to the Ford Explorer was because during the recession, Ford stopped producing Lincolns, which shared the chassis, and drive train of Ford Crown Victoria which was the most common patrol car of police, highway patrol, and sheriff depts. The Ford Explorer was the smallest vehicle that that could be uses as a universal vehicle to meet the requirements of most of their missions. Most depts/agencies of size and budget also had a few Mustangs or Chargers for the pure interceptor role because Explorers unlike the Crown Vics did not the room for modification under the hood.
 
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