Executive Order for Free Speech on College Campus

Dec 2018
1,867
1,199
Wisconsin
#1
Proposed order on campus speech follows wave of complaints

While the details are slim, it's sounding like the President will sign an executive order that could limit federal funding for public colleges that limit/put restrictions on campus. Over the last 10ish years, conservative speakers have seen increased restrictions in public speaking events. While it has happened to some liberal speakers, the ratio is probably around 10 to 1. That could be because colleges are left-wing sespools. That could be because right-wingers tend to be more bat-shit crazy. Or, just a thought, the truth could be somewhere in the middle.

While I'm not a fan of executive orders as a whole, I 100% support this kind of initiative. Should college campuses be a place where young adults feel safe? Yes... students should feel PHYSICALLY safe on campus. But should their ideas be challenged? Should their positions and opinions be challenged? 1000% yes.

So while I think people like Alex Jones and Gavin McInnes are bat shit crazy and care more about getting reactions than they do discussing politics, I think they should be allowed to speak if a student organization invites them. Then you let the public listen to their batshit crazy positions and expose the fact that they're bat shit crazy.
 
Mar 2013
9,570
10,282
Middle Tennessee
#2
On this we agree. If we're going to have free speech then it needs to be free for all. It's not up to the college to refuse speakers.
 
Dec 2018
1,867
1,199
Wisconsin
#3
On this we agree. If we're going to have free speech then it needs to be free for all. It's not up to the college to refuse speakers.
One clarification for me.

- If an official college organization reaches out to invite a speaker, the college itself should not get in the way.

- If a speaker reaches out to a college (no one from the college has invited them), I think the college has the right to refuse.
 
May 2018
5,330
3,411
Chicago
#4
Sorry but no.
One clarification for me.

- If an official college organization reaches out to invite a speaker, the college itself should not get in the way.

- If a speaker reaches out to a college (no one from the college has invited them), I think the college has the right to refuse.
Agreed.
 
Mar 2013
9,570
10,282
Middle Tennessee
#5
One clarification for me.

- If an official college organization reaches out to invite a speaker, the college itself should not get in the way.

- If a speaker reaches out to a college (no one from the college has invited them), I think the college has the right to refuse.
Agreed. Colleges are under no obligation to accept an uninvited speaker or even rent them space.
 
Likes: Athena
Apr 2013
37,122
25,325
La La Land North
#6
I would insist that therefore the federal government will be financially responsible for policing and security costs when people generally hated by the student body are allowed to speak at the university.

Speech is another thing that has consequences.
 
Dec 2013
33,456
19,263
Beware of watermelons
#7
I would insist that therefore the federal government will be financially responsible for policing and security costs when people generally hated by the student body are allowed to speak at the university.

Speech is another thing that has consequences.

Um.....why?




Then again, Canadian



From wiki



Freedom of expression in Canada is not absolute; Section 1 of the Charter allows the government to pass laws that limit free expression so long as the limits are reasonable and can be justified in a free and democratic society.[1][2] This can often be the subject of controversy as some feel the conditions for reasonable justification are vague, granting the government an unreasonable amount of control over freedom of expression. Others feel that such restrictions are necessary in order to balance the fundamental freedoms of one party against those of another, and to otherwise limit political violence and tyranny of the majority. Hate speech (which refers to the advocacy and incitement of genocide or violence against a particular defined racial, ethnic, gender, sexual, religious or other identifiable group),[3][4] and obscenity (a broad term referring to literature that is unreasonable, dangerous or intensely inappropriate to society at large, such as child pornography or fraudulent medication intended to promote sexual virility),[5] are two examples that gain significant attention from the media and in public discourse.[2]
 
Feb 2014
2,641
1,199
Oregon
#8
One clarification for me.

- If an official college organization reaches out to invite a speaker, the college itself should not get in the way.

- If a speaker reaches out to a college (no one from the college has invited them), I think the college has the right to refuse.
Nonsense. Young people should not believe themselves equal to their elders. I am a conservative liberal. :lol: Just because a bunch of kids think they want something, it doesn't mean they should have it. Leadership needs judgment and authority, and if students do not like the leadership of the college, should go to a different college.

Government controlling education as it is doing with increasing boldness is a very serious issue. Talk about a threat to our liberty, this is a big threat to our liberty!
 
Dec 2013
33,456
19,263
Beware of watermelons
#9
Nonsense. Young people should not believe themselves equal to their elders. I am a conservative liberal. :lol: Just because a bunch of kids think they want something, it doesn't mean they should have it. Leadership needs judgment and authority, and if students do not like the leadership of the college, should go to a different college.

Government controlling education as it is doing with increasing boldness is a very serious issue. Talk about a threat to our liberty, this is a big threat to our liberty!

I don't think that you understand the issue.

This has nothing to do with "government controlling education" in fact it is putting more in the hands of the students, removing control from the school who has been dictating who can speak on campus.

-Independent clubs form at schools.

-these clubs invite people to their events

-the clubs schedule, organize and pay for the events.