Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
68,112
27,933
Colorado
#1
Eye-yi-yi, more truth mixed with lies, but why would anyone expect anything different? Check out the full article. Here's a couple of zingers.

Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address

DJT: Wages are rising at the fastest pace in decades and growing for blue collar workers, who I promised to fight for. They’re growing faster than anyone else thought possible.

It’s not clear which wage measure Trump might be referring to here, but by multiple measures, wages are not growing at their fastest pace in decades. Hourly wages for nonsupervisory employees are up from last year by 3.4 percent, for example — a substantial pickup from recent years, signaling a tightening labor market — but by no means the highest rate in decades.

Similarly, median hourly wage growth, as tracked by the Atlanta Fed, is up from a few years ago but is not quite at pre-recession levels and is well below where it was before the 2001 recession. Weekly wage growth, similarly, is not at its highest point in decades.


DJT: I know that Congress is eager to pass an infrastructure bill, and I am eager to work with you on legislation to deliver new and important infrastructure investment, including investments in the cutting-edge industries of the future. This is not an option, this is a necessity.

As a candidate, Trump often promised to rebuild the nation's crumbling infrastructure, and in his inaugural address, he promised a $1 trillion “national rebuilding,” saying the country's “crumbling infrastructure will be replaced with new roads, bridges, tunnels, airports, and railways gleaming across our very, very beautiful land.” He initially promised a plan within his first 100 days in office, but it took over a year for him to deliver what ended up being just an outline of a plan.

In his 2018 State of the Union, Trump upped the ante, promising to spend “at least $1.5 trillion for the new infrastructure investment that our country so desperately needs.” But his proposal, finally delivered the next month, was very light on specifics and included very little federal funding — only $200 billion over 10 years. The rest of the money would have to come from state and local taxpayers and private investors, who would most likely be repaid by higher tolls and fees. When members of both parties balked, Trump suggested he would be willing to raise the federal gas tax up to 25 cents per gallon to help fund the plan, but that idea went nowhere with many of his fellow Republicans, and the entire issue disintegrated faster than a crack in a Chicago roadway in winter grows into a gigantic pothole.

Tonight, the president again tells Congress, “I am eager to work with you on legislation to deliver new and important infrastructure investment,” but this time he offers no promises and no dollar amounts.


Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address
 
Jun 2012
41,958
15,180
Barsoom
#3
Trump has a ways to go to match Bush's 4% GDP growth rate, and that includes two recessions.
 
Jun 2013
5,707
1,735
Katmandu
#4
Eye-yi-yi, more truth mixed with lies, but why would anyone expect anything different? Check out the full article. Here's a couple of zingers.

Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address

DJT: Wages are rising at the fastest pace in decades and growing for blue collar workers, who I promised to fight for. They’re growing faster than anyone else thought possible.


Weekly wage growth, similarly, is not at its highest point in decades.



Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address
These fact checkers aren't very factual.

1549482823995.png
 
Jun 2013
5,707
1,735
Katmandu
#7
Jun 2013
5,707
1,735
Katmandu
#9
Eye-yi-yi, more truth mixed with lies, but why would anyone expect anything different? Check out the full article. Here's a couple of zingers.

Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address

DJT: Wages are rising at the fastest pace in decades and growing for blue collar workers, who I promised to fight for. They’re growing faster than anyone else thought possible.

It’s not clear which wage measure Trump might be referring to here, but by multiple measures, wages are not growing at their fastest pace in decades. Hourly wages for nonsupervisory employees are up from last year by 3.4 percent, for example — a substantial pickup from recent years, signaling a tightening labor market — but by no means the highest rate in decades.

Similarly, median hourly wage growth, as tracked by the Atlanta Fed, is up from a few years ago but is not quite at pre-recession levels and is well below where it was before the 2001 recession. Weekly wage growth, similarly, is not at its highest point in decades.

DJT: I know that Congress is eager to pass an infrastructure bill, and I am eager to work with you on legislation to deliver new and important infrastructure investment, including investments in the cutting-edge industries of the future. This is not an option, this is a necessity.

As a candidate, Trump often promised to rebuild the nation's crumbling infrastructure, and in his inaugural address, he promised a $1 trillion “national rebuilding,” saying the country's “crumbling infrastructure will be replaced with new roads, bridges, tunnels, airports, and railways gleaming across our very, very beautiful land.” He initially promised a plan within his first 100 days in office, but it took over a year for him to deliver what ended up being just an outline of a plan.

In his 2018 State of the Union, Trump upped the ante, promising to spend “at least $1.5 trillion for the new infrastructure investment that our country so desperately needs.” But his proposal, finally delivered the next month, was very light on specifics and included very little federal funding — only $200 billion over 10 years. The rest of the money would have to come from state and local taxpayers and private investors, who would most likely be repaid by higher tolls and fees. When members of both parties balked, Trump suggested he would be willing to raise the federal gas tax up to 25 cents per gallon to help fund the plan, but that idea went nowhere with many of his fellow Republicans, and the entire issue disintegrated faster than a crack in a Chicago roadway in winter grows into a gigantic pothole.

Tonight, the president again tells Congress, “I am eager to work with you on legislation to deliver new and important infrastructure investment,” but this time he offers no promises and no dollar amounts.

Fact Check: Trump's State Of The Union Address
Your fact checker is very biased, for example:

Trump
"The U.S. economy is growing almost twice as fast today as when I took office, and we are considered far and away the hottest economy anywhere in the world. Not even close. (Applause.)"


Fact checker:

"The state of the U.S. economy is strong, as indicated by last week's blockbuster jobs report. Employers added a better-than-expected 304,000 jobs in January. Since Trump took office, the U.S. has added nearly 4.9 million jobs. While that is slightly below the 5.1 million jobs added in the previous 24 months, job growth in recent months appears to be accelerating.
The GOP tax cut passed in December 2017, together with increased government spending on both military and domestic programs, undoubtedly contributed to faster economic growth. Forecasters disagree, however, on whether that faster growth can be sustained. The White House predicts continued growth in the 3 percent range for a decade. Other forecasters, including the Congressional Budget Office, believe growth will quickly slow, averaging less than 2 percent over the decade."

They didn't even cite Trump's jobs claim on jobs, which Trump claimed from election, which as accurate, dishonest. They didn't even fact check what Trump actually said about growing twice as fast, they went off on some obtuse tangent about future growth predictions.

GDP grew at 1.5% in 2016 and GDP grew at over 3% in 2018, that's the facts, Jack.