Fascism was not left-wing !!!

Sep 2018
5,666
946
cleveland ohio
#1
Again the idea that people in the united states are so fucking ill informed and easily swayed , makes it obvious they are sheep incapable of independent thought
as asimov said so may years ago its like americans are proud of being stupid and proud of the stupid things they say
To say that fascism is an extremism of the political right, as defined in historical terms, is reasonable for the following reasons :

  • All actually-existed fascist states practised business-friendly economic policies, even if they were not ideologically laissez-faire. They could have easily done otherwise — this was after all the 1930s, the heyday and apogee of socialism as an ideology. But no fascist in power even contemplated taking the Soviet route of destroying the capital- and land-owning classes.
  • All actually-existed fascist states repressed labour unions, socialists, and communists. Despite the worker-friendly rhetoric of fascists, they in actual power regimented labour in such a way as to please any strike-breaking capitalist of the 19th century. The Nazis, for example, forced workers into a single state-controlled trades union (DAF), which controlled wage growth and prevented striking and wage arbitration. Businesses (some, not even most), by contrast, were given incentives to consolidate into Morgan-style industrial trusts as shareholers and engage in contractual relations as monopolists or near-monopolists with other trusts and with the state.
  • Communists have a demonstrated record of erasing traditional society root and branch — exterminating aristocrats, industrialists, landowners, priests, kulaks, etc. Fascists in actual power, despite their modernist reputation, seem almost traditional in comparison. In Mussolini’s Italy, the king, the titled nobility, the church, the industrialists, the landholders, and the mafia slept soundly at night. The chief innovation of fascism was not really in political economy, but in political community.
  • Self-proclaimed fascist parties in Europe in the 1920s and 1930s pinched their votes from the middle-class and conservative parties, not primarily from the socialists and the communists to whom their traditional constituencies (urban workers) mostly remained loyal. In Germany’s election of 1932, the Social Democrats and the Communists maintained their usual proportion of the combined vote (~35%), but the other traditional parties were substantially weakened, even hollowed out, with only the Catholic Zentrum maintaining double-digit strength (~12%).
  • Big business interests either were strong supporters of the fascists once in power, or (in some countries) had backed them well before their seizure of power.
  • Fascists fetishised law & order, and made a cult out of the armed forces.
  • Amongst observers in non-fascist countries, it was conservatives and businessmen, not progressives, who were the most numerous to express admiration for the fascists. There were a few prominent socialists like H G Wells who applauded some aspects of Mussolini’s regime, but these were mostly amongst intellectual kooks, and their significance pales in comparison to the conservative reaction which varied from enthusiastic approval of a bulwark against communism to benign indifference.
  • Other self-proclaimed fascists — those who took their inspiration from Hitler and Mussolini in the 1930s — were unambiguously conservative in the unambiguously traditional sense, without the “modernist” touches which set Hitler and Mussolini apart. If I had to use three words to describe Franco, the best ones would be “God, Country, Property”.
  • The Nazis were sui generis and idiosyncratic, an outlier amongst fascists, and perhaps they really shouldn’t be pegged into the left-right spectrum. But if they had to be, their political economy was clearly capitalist and therefore clearly distant from revolutionary or egalitarian socialism.
Actual fascists who came to power behaved in a similarly labour-repressive, business-friendly, violently antisocialist way, albeit with national variations. Why were they so unanimous in their hysterical hatred of communists and socialists ? Could it have been that there was some “ideological space” for property and capitalism amongst fascists, albeit not well articulated theoretically ?

In the 1920s British conservatives generally approved of Mussolini, and liberals and socialists generally criticised him. I don’t mean that conservatives wanted fascism in Britain, but they thought it was an effective antidote to communism, admired fascist law & order, and found in it a healthy example of national pride. Of course Churchill was an early admirer of Mussolini and remained one until the early 1930s, and he took the nationalist side in the Spanish civil war.

There were ambivalences and exceptions on both left and right, but the general trend is of disapproval on the left and approval on the right. Moreover, appeasement of the Nazis in the 1930s was, at root, motivated by conservative fears of Bolshevism and the feeling that the Nazis were the lesser of two evils.

You can find some positive things uttered about Mussolini by the left-wing British press until 1924 or so, because the nature of Italian fascism was not yet clear and some people still believed fascism was a working-class phenomenon. But 1924 is a clear dividing line, because in that year a famous Italian socialist by the name of Matteotti was murdered by Mussolini’s regime and the destruction of the Italian left was in full swing.

(2)

At least in peace time, the Nazi regime largely respected property rights (at least of those deemed Aryan enough). It did not, with one major exception, nationalise industries; nor did Nazi economic policies use brute compulsion and peremptory diktats against businesses. Rather the Nazis relied on incentives and manipulation to get what they wanted out of the private sector. From “The Role of Private Property in the Nazi Economy: The Case of Industry” :


Fascism was not left-wing !!!
 
Likes: leekohler2
Jun 2012
41,363
14,997
Barsoom
#2
Fascism is as far left as it can be based on the political spectrum of what constitutes the left end of the spectrum.
 
Sep 2018
5,666
946
cleveland ohio
#5
Fascism is as far left as it can be based on the political spectrum of what constitutes the left end of the spectrum.
i knda liked mussolini hitler was just crazy off the chart left right doesnt even matter hitler was pre evil mussolini was alright for many years hitler led him astray
 
Sep 2018
5,666
946
cleveland ohio
#7
Fascism is as far left as it can be based on the political spectrum of what constitutes the left end of the spectrum.
In the mid-1930s, the Nazi regime transferred public ownership to the private sector. In doing so, they went against the mainstream trends in western capitalistic countries, none of which systematically reprivatized firms during the 1930s. Capitalism and Nazism
 
Sep 2018
5,666
946
cleveland ohio
#8
Thanks for posting this, Bill. Very informative and a nice bit of history for those who aren't aware.
which is most americans dumb ass americans
Isaac Asimov > Quotes > Quotable Quote

“There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.”

― Issac Asimov