Georgia still hasn’t managed to rename Runaway Negro Creek

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
67,736
27,616
Colorado
#1
But, they are working on it....

Georgia still hasn’t managed to rename
Runaway Negro Creek
Just outside Savannah, in one of the wealthiest places in the U.S., there’s an ugly token of Georgia’s history: "Runaway Negro Creek," a tiny body of water on Skidaway Island where slaves may have once escaped their life of brutality and forced labor.​
Since March, Georgia legislators have formally pushed for that area to be renamed “Freedom Creek.” The state’s Republican governor, Nathan Deal, signed an overwhelmingly supported resolution to begin the process to do so in May. And then, for several months, nothing happened.​
State archive officials failed to send the petition to the federal government’s U.S. Board of Geographic Names — it’s not clear why — until the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noted in December that no further action had been taken. State officials finally relayed the petition on Dec. 21, and the Journal-Constitution reported Jan. 1 that researchers with the Board on Geographic Names had finally received it and could begin a process to change the creek’s name....​
In Georgia, it’s believed that African-American slaves from the nearby Modena Plantation used to escape across the water to Union-occupied islands like Hilton Head or Fort Pulaski, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. And, according to the paper, this might be the creek’s second name-change. There are references to a “Runaway N---er Creek” in late-1800s editions of the Savannah Morning News....​
More: Georgia still hasn't managed to rename Runaway Negro Creek
 
Apr 2014
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redacted
#2
But, they are working on it....

Georgia still hasn’t managed to rename
Runaway Negro Creek
Just outside Savannah, in one of the wealthiest places in the U.S., there’s an ugly token of Georgia’s history: "Runaway Negro Creek," a tiny body of water on Skidaway Island where slaves may have once escaped their life of brutality and forced labor.​
Since March, Georgia legislators have formally pushed for that area to be renamed “Freedom Creek.” The state’s Republican governor, Nathan Deal, signed an overwhelmingly supported resolution to begin the process to do so in May. And then, for several months, nothing happened.​
State archive officials failed to send the petition to the federal government’s U.S. Board of Geographic Names — it’s not clear why — until the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noted in December that no further action had been taken. State officials finally relayed the petition on Dec. 21, and the Journal-Constitution reported Jan. 1 that researchers with the Board on Geographic Names had finally received it and could begin a process to change the creek’s name....​
In Georgia, it’s believed that African-American slaves from the nearby Modena Plantation used to escape across the water to Union-occupied islands like Hilton Head or Fort Pulaski, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. And, according to the paper, this might be the creek’s second name-change. There are references to a “Runaway N---er Creek” in late-1800s editions of the Savannah Morning News....​
More: Georgia still hasn't managed to rename Runaway Negro Creek
The downside to ultra-political correctness is that it erases the past. George Santayana is often quoted as saying “Those who don’t remember the past are condemned to repeat it”. If we erase the past, then no one will remember it.

Instead of seeking to change the name, I’d recommend establishing a fund to set up a learning/tourist center to help people remember the past and how “Runaway Negro Creek” got it’s name. Change it to “freedom creek” and nobody will give shit.
 
Jun 2018
5,825
1,351
South Dakota
#3
But, they are working on it....

Georgia still hasn’t managed to rename
Runaway Negro Creek
Just outside Savannah, in one of the wealthiest places in the U.S., there’s an ugly token of Georgia’s history: "Runaway Negro Creek," a tiny body of water on Skidaway Island where slaves may have once escaped their life of brutality and forced labor.​
Since March, Georgia legislators have formally pushed for that area to be renamed “Freedom Creek.” The state’s Republican governor, Nathan Deal, signed an overwhelmingly supported resolution to begin the process to do so in May. And then, for several months, nothing happened.​
State archive officials failed to send the petition to the federal government’s U.S. Board of Geographic Names — it’s not clear why — until the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noted in December that no further action had been taken. State officials finally relayed the petition on Dec. 21, and the Journal-Constitution reported Jan. 1 that researchers with the Board on Geographic Names had finally received it and could begin a process to change the creek’s name....​
In Georgia, it’s believed that African-American slaves from the nearby Modena Plantation used to escape across the water to Union-occupied islands like Hilton Head or Fort Pulaski, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. And, according to the paper, this might be the creek’s second name-change. There are references to a “Runaway N---er Creek” in late-1800s editions of the Savannah Morning News....​
More: Georgia still hasn't managed to rename Runaway Negro Creek
When I was into hiking I liked Palomar Mt in San Diego country. The Geodetic survey maps showed a primitave road up the Mt named N.... Nate Grade for an early resident of the area. I don't know when it was changed but it's now Nate Harrison Grade.
 
Likes: RNG

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
67,736
27,616
Colorado
#4
When I was into hiking I liked Palomar Mt in San Diego country. The Geodetic survey maps showed a primitave road up the Mt named N.... Nate Grade for an early resident of the area. I don't know when it was changed but it's now Nate Harrison Grade.
Is that where the observatory is?
 
Apr 2013
38,083
26,091
La La Land North
#5
I agree with Clicker above. I did argue against the Confederacy monuments that were put up in modern times but as to the ones put up say in the 1800s, they are part of history. Many of the ones taken down were put up during the civil rights push.

All kinds of statues of John A, McDonald, Canada's first Prime Minister are being taken down because he was very bigoted against the indigenous people. But he was also the main driver in the creation of Canada. And he is, like it or not a real historical fact. Taking the statues down or renaming that creek are trying to milquetoast history.
 
Jul 2018
2,153
522
Earth
#6
But, they are working on it....

Georgia still hasn’t managed to rename
Runaway Negro Creek
Just outside Savannah, in one of the wealthiest places in the U.S., there’s an ugly token of Georgia’s history: "Runaway Negro Creek," a tiny body of water on Skidaway Island where slaves may have once escaped their life of brutality and forced labor.​
Since March, Georgia legislators have formally pushed for that area to be renamed “Freedom Creek.” The state’s Republican governor, Nathan Deal, signed an overwhelmingly supported resolution to begin the process to do so in May. And then, for several months, nothing happened.​
State archive officials failed to send the petition to the federal government’s U.S. Board of Geographic Names — it’s not clear why — until the Atlanta Journal-Constitution noted in December that no further action had been taken. State officials finally relayed the petition on Dec. 21, and the Journal-Constitution reported Jan. 1 that researchers with the Board on Geographic Names had finally received it and could begin a process to change the creek’s name....​
In Georgia, it’s believed that African-American slaves from the nearby Modena Plantation used to escape across the water to Union-occupied islands like Hilton Head or Fort Pulaski, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. And, according to the paper, this might be the creek’s second name-change. There are references to a “Runaway N---er Creek” in late-1800s editions of the Savannah Morning News....​
More: Georgia still hasn't managed to rename Runaway Negro Creek
Do you want to change the name of Negro Mountain? Negro Mountain - Wikipedia
 
May 2018
6,392
4,262
Chicago
#7
I agree with Clicker above. I did argue against the Confederacy monuments that were put up in modern times but as to the ones put up say in the 1800s, they are part of history. Many of the ones taken down were put up during the civil rights push.

All kinds of statues of John A, McDonald, Canada's first Prime Minister are being taken down because he was very bigoted against the indigenous people. But he was also the main driver in the creation of Canada. And he is, like it or not a real historical fact. Taking the statues down or renaming that creek are trying to milquetoast history.
Oh, I don't know. I think I'd be pretty pissed off if some creek were named "Butt F***ing F****t Creek" sometime in the distant past and it wasn't ever changed. I'd want that changed.
 
Jul 2018
2,153
522
Earth
#10

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