Google tracked his bike ride past a burglarized home. That made him a suspect.

Nov 2005
10,100
5,461
California
The email arrived on a Tuesday afternoon in January, startling Zachary McCoy as he prepared to leave for his job at a restaurant in Gainesville, Florida.

It was from Google’s legal investigations support team, writing to let him know that local police had demanded information related to his Google account. The company said it would release the data unless he went to court and tried to block it. He had just seven days.
....

In the notice from Google was a case number. McCoy searched for it on the Gainesville Police Department’s website, and found a one-page investigation report on the burglary of an elderly woman’s home 10 months earlier. The crime had occurred less than a mile from the home that McCoy, who had recently earned an associate degree in computer programming, shared with two others.

Now McCoy was even more panicked and confused. He knew he had nothing to do with the break-in ─ he’d never even been to the victim’s house ─ and didn’t know anyone who might have. And he didn’t have much time to prove it.

McCoy worried that going straight to police would lead to his arrest. So he went to his parents’ home in St. Augustine, where, over dinner, he told them what was happening. They agreed to dip into their savings to pay for a lawyer.

The lawyer, Caleb Kenyon, dug around and learned that the notice had been prompted by a “geofence warrant,” a police surveillance tool that casts a virtual dragnet over crime scenes, sweeping up Google location data — drawn from users’ GPS, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and cellular connections — from everyone nearby.

The warrants, which have increased dramatically in the past two years, can help police find potential suspects when they have no leads. They also scoop up data from people who have nothing to do with the crime, often without their knowing ─ which Google itself has described as “a significant incursion on privacy.”

Stuff like this where both parties are complicit in ignoring our rights disgust me. It's not even a talking point for either party. Not even a discussion item. Both sides are simply on-board with trampling on our rights.
 
Feb 2020
1,640
595
Houston

Stuff like this where both parties are complicit in ignoring our rights disgust me. It's not even a talking point for either party. Not even a discussion item. Both sides are simply on-board with trampling on our rights.
I feel your pain ifoundit66.

For relief, click Here
 
Aug 2019
1,449
1,689
Albuquerque, NM

Stuff like this where both parties are complicit in ignoring our rights disgust me. It's not even a talking point for either party. Not even a discussion item. Both sides are simply on-board with trampling on our rights.
Our politicians work not for the people, but for the corporations. Letting these companies sell all your data and information is BS. Europe has strict rules, while the US, with all its supposed freedoms, allows companies to make millions off spying and sharing information. Complete BS

This is something everybody should be outraged about
 
Nov 2005
10,100
5,461
California
Our politicians work not for the people, but for the corporations. Letting these companies sell all your data and information is BS. Europe has strict rules, while the US, with all its supposed freedoms, allows companies to make millions off spying and sharing information. Complete BS
This is something everybody should be outraged about
Europe has had legislation passed which protects user's confidentiality, requires explicit permission for sharing (not a "you need to fill out some hidden forms to try to opt out" method), and requires companies to purge user information on request.
The U.S. has nothing like this.

Instead of fixing the problem of companies selling data, the U.S. government partakes in it.
 
Feb 2020
1,640
595
Houston
Does that work for you?
You say you feel my pain. I would assume that you share my opinion that the problem needs to be addressed.
But are you a libertarian?
Yes, I am.

I've said it like a million times, but some on here just wants to call me "RW" to argue against a strawman.

Yes, the problem needs to be addressed.

I have an appointment coming up, but I'll come back and tell you my version of the libertarian solution.
 
Aug 2019
1,449
1,689
Albuquerque, NM
Europe has had legislation passed which protects user's confidentiality, requires explicit permission for sharing (not a "you need to fill out some hidden forms to try to opt out" method), and requires companies to purge user information on request.
The U.S. has nothing like this.

Instead of fixing the problem of companies selling data, the U.S. government partakes in it.
Yup, because this country is all about one thing and one thing only, greed. Getting the most profit, no matter the costs.
 
Nov 2005
10,100
5,461
California
Relief? Found in a Libertarian website. Why not provide a link to Disneyland?
I did a couple searches on the site to see what it's plan was.
Came up with nothing of substance. If anything, it wants to talk about government "spying" which is profoundly different from the government retrieving information from companies by buying it or issuing a warrant that realistically does not satisfy the requirements for a warrant in the first damn place.

The Libertarian Party is the only political party that supports full freedom of expression and opposes government censorship, regulation, or control of communications media and technology.​
Outside the boundaries of this issue, I read this as a complete avoidance of the issue of customer / user info sale between companies.
 
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Dec 2015
21,204
22,166
Arizona
I did a couple searches on the site to see what it's plan was.
Came up with nothing of substance. If anything, it wants to talk about government "spying" which is profoundly different from the government retrieving information from companies by buying it or issuing a warrant that realistically does not satisfy the requirements for a warrant in the first damn place.

The Libertarian Party is the only political party that supports full freedom of expression and opposes government censorship, regulation, or control of communications media and technology.​
Outside the boundaries of this issue, I read this as a complete avoidance of the issue of customer / user info sale between companies.
Of course, there was nothing of substance because the "Tarians" are a mishmash of high principles and pure nuttiness. These folks are "misunderstood", "mischaracterized", and dissatisfied with traditional party policies, but when you ask specific questions you'll get a dismissal with the following codicil: “ we support full freedom of expression and oppose government censorship, regulation or control of communications media and technology.”
To hell with D.C.
Let's self-govern because we're such honest, decent, law-abiding citizens in all things, while waving the flag of free-market everything. God bless us everyone.
Like I said: Disneyland and the Magic Kingdom.