Has politics replaced religion?

Jan 2015
3,179
2,058
MD
#22
Many passages in the Bible speak of this time.

4 “See to it that no one misleads you. 5 For many will come in My name, saying, ‘I am the Christ,’ and will mislead many. 6 You will be hearing of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not frightened, for those things must take place, but that is not yet the end. 7 For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, and in various places there will be famines and earthquakes. 8 But all these things are merelythe beginning of birth pangs.

9 “Then they will deliver you to tribulation, and will kill you, and you will be hated by all nations because of My name. 10 At that time many will [d]fall away and will [e]betray one another and hate one another. 11 Many false prophets will arise and will mislead many. 12 Because lawlessness is increased, [f]most people’s love will grow cold

13 “Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it. 14 For the gate is small and the way is narrow that leads to life, and there are few who find it.

15 “Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves.

21 “Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter. 22 Many will say to Me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many [n]miracles?’ 23 And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness.’
THIS--RIGHT HERE: “Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves."
We’ve got a whole lot of false prophets running around here. Too many.
 
Jul 2014
13,840
8,375
massachusetts
#23
It's the dogma, the certainty of religion,and of political movements that can do horrible things

 
Jan 2015
3,179
2,058
MD
#24
I don't agree regarding "no better".
I think there are members of both party who devolve into what you describe in post #1. I will happily agree with that where SJW on both sides have devolved into a lack of respect and appreciation.

However, the left has never pushed an insulting candidate like Trump to the forefront as the right has. The right actually has the sheer numbers within their party to pull that off.
In the last election, they could have nominated (and probably successfully elected) one of the nominees who wasn't acting in a way that embarrasses the country.
In the past, they nominated John McCain who looked one of his voters in the eye and said that Obama was not a secret Muslim.
“No ma’am,” McCain said. “He’s a decent family man, a citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues, and that’s what this campaign is all about.”

But not today. Today the right has elected a politician to the highest office in this land who exactly matches your description of: "negativity and trolling is rewarded with clout and notoriety"

While the left has members who would do likewise (which I think we can agree on), they are NOT the majority on the left like they are on the right today...
1. Regarding Donald Trump, it’s worth noting that many of the people who voted for him in 2016 (poor, uneducated White folks) voted Democrat in previous elections. It’s important to note why Trump was nominated and elected: The liberal elite no longer represented these people. Trump gave these people a cult to follow and he has successfully manipulated this base because of this.

2. How do you know they aren’t the majority? Have you seen the things that SJWs do on social media? They dox people just as much as the alt-right does, and they troll and clout chase as much as the right does as well. SJWs are as oppressive, dogmatic, and Puritan as they claim many on the right are.
 
Dec 2006
26,166
11,230
New Haven, CT
#25
SJWs are as oppressive, dogmatic, and Puritan as they claim many on the right are.
Sadly, I have to agree with that statement.
Because I have always been intolerant of racism, misogyny, homophobia, Islamaphobia, Xenophobia, ageism, and any other form of bigotry and prejudice, I used to self-identify as a 'social justice warrior.'
No longer. They have become absolute daggers to the heart of compassionate, intelligent, righteous and equality-minded movements and agendas. When the line you spout is, as you say, puritanical and fanatical in its message, you turn away possible followers and believers and only attract the fringe lunatics and fanatics. When, as Gordy mentioned earlier, Arianna Grande is condemned by the SJWs as racist because she got a tan (?!?) or a small group of SJWs on the Purdue University campus prevail and get the pronouns representing male and female banned from campus, so that nobody can write he, her, him, she, his, hers in a scholastic paper - we have reached the line where I cannot cross and join the crowd.
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
66,048
26,460
Colorado
#26
1. Regarding Donald Trump, it’s worth noting that many of the people who voted for him in 2016 (poor, uneducated White folks) voted Democrat in previous elections. It’s important to note why Trump was nominated and elected: The liberal elite no longer represented these people. Trump gave these people a cult to follow and he has successfully manipulated this base because of this.

2. How do you know they aren’t the majority? Have you seen the things that SJWs do on social media? They dox people just as much as the alt-right does, and they troll and clout chase as much as the right does as well. SJWs are as oppressive, dogmatic, and Puritan as they claim many on the right are.
No one on the left wants to hear this, but it's true. It's hard for me to admit this, but it's true. The choices we had for president in 2016 demonstrate, it's true. If things move forward as they are now, we will have a similar set of choices in 2020.
 
Likes: tristanrobin

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
66,048
26,460
Colorado
#27
Sadly, I have to agree with that statement.
Because I have always been intolerant of racism, misogyny, homophobia, Islamaphobia, Xenophobia, ageism, and any other form of bigotry and prejudice, I used to self-identify as a 'social justice warrior.'
No longer. They have become absolute daggers to the heart of compassionate, intelligent, righteous and equality-minded movements and agendas. When the line you spout is, as you say, puritanical and fanatical in its message, you turn away possible followers and believers and only attract the fringe lunatics and fanatics. When, as Gordy mentioned earlier, Arianna Grande is condemned by the SJWs as racist because she got a tan (?!?) or a small group of SJWs on the Purdue University campus prevail and get the pronouns representing male and female banned from campus, so that nobody can write he, her, him, she, his, hers in a scholastic paper - we have reached the line where I cannot cross and join the crowd.
I agree, and agreeing feels like a sigh of relief, like the lifting of a burden unconsciously carried, like soberly acknowledging what's true.
 
Likes: tristanrobin
Dec 2015
15,021
13,893
Arizona
#29
As a Methodist, I can tell you what's going on in my religious denomination. Politics and religion have definitely become tangled and it's a really difficult WEB for many to navigate--particularly the seniors in this retirement community, many of whom voted for Trump.
On the one hand, they are really good people. Most are educated, pretty wealthy, retired CEOS/military/white collars. They have always considered themselves to be Conservatives, but their Conservative stance seems to be toying with their Christian upbringing/history. They are generous by nature, devoted to their families, church-going volunteers. They are facing a real dilemma because.........
On the other hand, the Methodist Church SUPPORTS tolerance and diversity IN ALL THINGS. That includes the gay/trans community as they join the ranks of pastors and members and same-sex marriages. That includes the illegal immigration issue (this is Arizona--a border state). That includes gender equality--as more and more women become pastors. That includes rejecting any form of discrimination. That includes environmental protections for God's world and our part in protecting our planet, i.e. climate change debate. That includes standing firm against violence, including gun violence.
In other words--this is a pretty LIBERAL doctrine.
Some of the issues above have split congregations because Methodists are leaning more to the left. Our weekend sermons always include directives on how we can serve others, love our neighbors and support missions. Doesn't sound so hard, does it? BUT it is for some Methodists and of course like many other denominations are membership is DOWN significantly.

So to answer Gordy's question. Politics may not have REPLACED religion, but it has most certainly influenced religion--in a big big way.
 
Likes: tristanrobin
Jun 2018
4,531
1,083
South Dakota
#30
Churches used to go out and help the homeless and feed the hungry.
I did believe that this was a trend among Christian churches. I remember what it was like during my upbringing in rural Ohio. Going out in the world and settling in Southern Calif I began to develop a different view. I now spend mot of my time in rural Missouri and have again begun to change my opinion. The community service efforts of churches in the areas I've become familiar with are not only as strong as I remember but have become far more complex in their efforts. What I see as their biggest problems are how to find the people in need and how to provide assistance without appearing to be condescending.