Has politics replaced religion?

Jan 2014
164
139
#31
I think that most people don’t realize that many churches accept state and federal funding to help provide services to those in need.
 
Feb 2007
3,387
1,744
New York
#32
I have something that has been burdening my heart for a long time, and I feel that this is the perfect place to share it. I was having a conversation with someone the other day, and we were discussing how all religious beliefs attempt to explain and appease the existential crises we all have; he said that we must gage our beliefs on what is good, rather than what feels good. I brought up how I feel that the issue with Western society is that it promotes short-term pleasure over long-term fulfillment. He made a very good point about how politics is a great example of this: Pleasure isn't just what we physically want, but what feeds our egos as well. People feel pleasure when their fears and hatreds are validated and justified. For evidence of this, all one needs to do is go on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram where it seems that negativity and trolling is rewarded with clout and notoriety. Most contemporary movements have fed on this desire to be as negative and offensive as possible (SJWs, the alt-right, contemporary feminists, liberals, conservatives, etc.).

The Christian gospel which preached about helping your fellow man and treating people with respect, has been replaced by modern-day cults which preach hatred for -- and domination of -- the Other. Evangelism has been replaced with internet trolling and clout chasing. I would go even farther to say that most contemporary political movements are glorified cults in which everyone is expected to act and think the same -- This, imo, is because politics has replaced religion. The desire to provide meaning to one's life is inherent in every human being, and sadly many of us fill it with meaningless nonsense.

Thoughts?
Kudos to you for a really interesting subject!

I believe that humans are programmed to seek connection. It is one of the traits of being a communal animal. Religion is one of the ways that people seek connection on a larger scale; a connection to something bigger than themselves. If you think about it, politics could absolutely fill that same need for some- the connection to something bigger than self- that religion does. Like religion, politics also tends to be one of the "core identity" subjects. Meaning that most individuals invest part of their identity as a person into their affiliation with a religion of political ideology. Because of this, a simply "I don't agree with you" for some becomes "You are wrong/inferior as a human being" by the time it reaches their ears and they respond with great hostility.
 
Jan 2014
164
139
#34
I'd like to hear more about that. Do you have any sources?
I have no published source to offer you at the moment.

What I do have is over twenty years of experience in government funding and, specifically, the allocation of tax dollars to agencies (including churches) for the purpose of providing social services.
While I won’t go into detail because of professional ethics, I can tell you that I monitored contracts for many religious groups and churches to provide social services with federal and state funds over the years.
 
Apr 2013
38,049
26,062
La La Land North
#38
No one on the left wants to hear this, but it's true. It's hard for me to admit this, but it's true. The choices we had for president in 2016 demonstrate, it's true. If things move forward as they are now, we will have a similar set of choices in 2020.
I think not. Hillary was so far the favorite going in, plus the DNC regs with their superdelegates were insurmountable.

The potential candidates for the Democrats this year are mostly far better at first look. Never say never but I am hopeful.
 
Jan 2015
3,488
2,210
MD
#39
Sadly, I have to agree with that statement.
Because I have always been intolerant of racism, misogyny, homophobia, Islamaphobia, Xenophobia, ageism, and any other form of bigotry and prejudice, I used to self-identify as a 'social justice warrior.'
No longer. They have become absolute daggers to the heart of compassionate, intelligent, righteous and equality-minded movements and agendas. When the line you spout is, as you say, puritanical and fanatical in its message, you turn away possible followers and believers and only attract the fringe lunatics and fanatics. When, as Gordy mentioned earlier, Arianna Grande is condemned by the SJWs as racist because she got a tan (?!?) or a small group of SJWs on the Purdue University campus prevail and get the pronouns representing male and female banned from campus, so that nobody can write he, her, him, she, his, hers in a scholastic paper - we have reached the line where I cannot cross and join the crowd.
"Social justice" has become less about justice and more about punishing "problematic" people. It's a cult.

No one on the left wants to hear this, but it's true. It's hard for me to admit this, but it's true. The choices we had for president in 2016 demonstrate, it's true. If things move forward as they are now, we will have a similar set of choices in 2020.
It absolutely is the truth. Will things improve? I don't know. I've learned to stop putting my faith in politicians. My faith is in Christ.
 
Jan 2015
3,488
2,210
MD
#40
Kudos to you for a really interesting subject!

I believe that humans are programmed to seek connection. It is one of the traits of being a communal animal. Religion is one of the ways that people seek connection on a larger scale; a connection to something bigger than themselves. If you think about it, politics could absolutely fill that same need for some- the connection to something bigger than self- that religion does. Like religion, politics also tends to be one of the "core identity" subjects. Meaning that most individuals invest part of their identity as a person into their affiliation with a religion of political ideology. Because of this, a simply "I don't agree with you" for some becomes "You are wrong/inferior as a human being" by the time it reaches their ears and they respond with great hostility.
Absolutely.