Health care could be behind Canada's longer life expectancy

Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#21
Nope. My detailed plan would be to remove the state completely.
how about the mental hospital you obviously belong in ,what we need is what britain has an nhs or itlay or costa rica there can be a private sector but health care for the most part should be nationalized
 
Dec 2013
31,125
18,661
Beware of watermelons
#22
In the US, in many states you could practice medicine without a license into the early 1900's, earliest licensing in the US began in the second half of the 19th century.
Back in the days when blowing smoke up your ass was an actual treatment......

And it was in 1937 that 105 people died from taking Elixir Sulfanilamide,

Yup, that was "science" same w/ leaching, lobotomy, and a number of other crazy things of the past. I wonder what will be looked back on our age as crazy and barbaric? Abortion? Sex change operations? All Elective plastic surgery?

Who knows?


Since the early 1900s, medical special interests have been lobbying politicians to reduce competition. By the 1980s, the U.S. was restricting the supply of physicians, hospitals, insurance and pharmaceuticals, while subsidizing demand. Since then, the U.S. has been trying to control high costs by moving toward something perhaps best described by the House Budget Committee: “In too many areas of the economy — especially energy, housing, finance, and health care — free enterprise has given way to government control in “partnership” with a few large or politically well-connected companies” (Ryan 2012). The following are past major laws and other policies implemented by the Federal and state governments that have interfered with the health care marketplace (HHS 2013):

  • In 1910, the physician oligopoly was started during the Republican administration of William Taft after the American Medical Association lobbied the states to strengthen the regulation of medical licensure and allow their state AMA offices to oversee the closure or merger of nearly half of medical schools and also the reduction of class sizes. The states have been subsidizing the education of the number of doctors recommended by the AMA.
  • In 1925, prescription drug monopolies begun after the federal government led by Republican President Calvin Coolidge started allowing the patenting of drugs. (Drug monopolies have also been promoted by government research and development subsidies targeted to favored pharmaceutical companies.)
  • In 1945, buyer monopolization begun after the McCarran-Ferguson Act led by the Roosevelt Administration exempted the business of medical insurance from most federal regulation, including antitrust laws. (States have also more recently contributed to the monopolization by requiring health care plans to meet standards for coverage.)
  • In 1946, institutional provider monopolization begun after favored hospitals received federal subsidies (matching grants and loans) provided under the Hospital Survey and Construction Act passed during the Truman Administration. (States have also been exempting non-profit hospitals from antitrust laws.)
  • In 1951, employers started to become the dominant third-party insurance buyer during the Truman Administration after the Internal Revenue Service declared group premiums tax-deductible.
  • In 1965, nationalization was started with a government buyer monopoly after the Johnson Administration led passage of Medicare and Medicaid which provided health insurance for the elderly and poor, respectively.
  • In 1972, institutional provider monopolization was strengthened after the Nixon Administration started restricting the supply of hospitals by requiring federal certificate-of-need for the construction of medical facilities.
  • In 1974, buyer monopolization was strengthened during the Nixon Administration after the Employee Retirement Income Security Act exempted employee health benefit plans offered by large employers (e.g., HMOs) from state regulations and lawsuits (e.g., brought by people denied coverage).
  • In 1984, prescription drug monopolies were strengthened during the Reagan Administration after the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act permitted the extension of patents beyond 20 years. (The government has also allowed pharmaceuticals companies to bribe physicians to prescribe more expensive drugs.)
  • In 2003, prescription drug monopolies were strengthened during the Bush Administration after the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act provided subsidies to the elderly for drugs.
  • In 2014, nationalization will be strengthened after the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (“Obamacare”) provided mandates, subsidies and insurance exchanges, and the expansion of Medicaid.



How Government Regulations Made Healthcare So Expensive | Mike Holly
 
Jul 2014
12,829
7,742
massachusetts
#23
Medicine that works costs a lot more than medicine that doesn't.
Doctors who know what they are doing cost more than yahoos who put up a shingle and don't know shit.
If you stopped licensing doctors, and anyone could put out a shingle and call themselves a doctor.
If you repealed all the regulation requiring drugs to be safe and effective, and let drug companies claim anything they wanted to.

Do you think it would be an improvement?
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#24
Medicine that works costs a lot more than medicine that doesn't.
Doctors who know what they are doing cost more than yahoos who put up a shingle and don't know shit.
If you stopped licensing doctors, and anyone could put out a shingle and call themselves a doctor.
If you repealed all the regulation requiring drugs to be safe and effective, and let drug companies claim anything they wanted to.

Do you think it would be an improvement?
people would die there is a reason these relgulations were created in the first place.. to deregualte to that point is absolute insanity anyone who would even suggest such a thing is not living in the real world, i honeslty feeel sorry for anyone that insane
 
May 2018
3,748
2,218
Chicago
#25
Why do Canadians live longer than Americans?
Canadians are outliving Americans, in some cases, by as much as a decade. Is public healthcare the secret to longevity?

When Erick Bauer was first diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF) as an infant, his parents were told he'd be lucky to make it to his 20th birthday.

Now turning 32 and expecting his first child, Mr Bauer attributes his relatively good health to the close relationship he has with his medical team at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto, which he says helps him maintain a healthy and active lifestyle.

He takes about 60 pills a day to help control the hereditary disease, which can affect the lungs, pancreas and gastro-intestinal tract.

"For all those younger CF patients who live with the disease right now, it is really important to just keep searching for that cure or that control for that disease," he told the BBC. "That is my hope for the future."

Life expectancy for cystic fibrosis patients has increased much faster in Canada than it has in the US, a new study published this month in the Annals of Internal Medicine found.
Gee, it doesn't take a rocket scientist. Universal healthcare works. Good god, why is anyone even still against this?

No one should need a study to tell them this basic fact. At 51 years of age, having lived un the USA and being a huge fan of the free market (I'm in advertising for god's sake) it is obvious that the free market does not work for everything. There are certain things that we all should be able to agree are not best served by the free market- police, fire departments and medical care.

Those should all be basic things we can expect from a civilized society. And they need to be paid for with taxes. The police and fire departments are, but what good does it do you if you're rescued in a fire, but can't pay your medical bills after a fireman saved your life? If a police officer saves your life after you've been shot, what good is done if you go bankrupt after your medical bills to remove the bullet?

If you get cancer, why should that cost you your life's savings and endanger your family as well?

It shouldn't. But in the USA, the richest country in the world, it does. And that to me, as a lifelong US citizen, is unacceptable.
 
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Jul 2015
4,792
2,181
chicago
#26
Medicine that works costs a lot more than medicine that doesn't.
Doctors who know what they are doing cost more than yahoos who put up a shingle and don't know shit.
If you stopped licensing doctors, and anyone could put out a shingle and call themselves a doctor.
If you repealed all the regulation requiring drugs to be safe and effective, and let drug companies claim anything they wanted to.

Do you think it would be an improvement?
You are talking about Doctors but frankly that is not the topic. The topic is of course about regulation of healthcare Basically about insurance. The deregulation part is about getting the government out of the way of me contracting for private insurance with an insurer.
 
Jul 2015
4,792
2,181
chicago
#27
Gee, it doesn't take a rocket scientist. Universal healthcare works. Good god, why is anyone even still against this?

No one should need a study to tell them this basic fact.
I'm against it because it would be better if it were run as a private matter.Sure we can have public clinics for indigent people. That is fine. This should have nothing to do with me making my own private arrangements with an insurance company.
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#28
You are talking about Doctors but frankly that is not the topic. The topic is of course about regulation of healthcare Basically about insurance. The deregulation part is about getting the government out of the way of me contracting for private insurance with an insurer.
private insurace is why it costs so much canada and uk have state run systems that spend about half per capita back home in holland the system is totally private there is no madicare or medicaid its all private insurance, HOWEVER IT IS HEAVILY REGUALTED AND SUBSIDIZED Netherlands : International Health Care System Profiles Netherlands : International Health Care System Profiles deregualtion makes it more expensive and pre existing conditions and such are not covered if it isnt regualted its a con a farce they take your oney and let you die
 
Sep 2018
5,666
948
cleveland ohio
#29
I'm against it because it would be better if it were run as a private matter.Sure we can have public clinics for indigent people. That is fine. This should have nothing to do with me making my own private arrangements with an insurance company.
I'm against it because it would be better if it were run as a private matter.Sure we can have public clinics for indigent people. That is fine. This should have nothing to do with me making my own private arrangements with an insurance company.
could i respectfully ask how you feel about the swiss system , which is primarily private sector run Switzerland : International Health Care System Profiles