Here's how Ayn Rand helped turn the US into a selfish and greedy nation

Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#11
Dissagree.

Not my god



Individualism vs. Collectivism: Our Future, Our Choice

The fundamental political conflict in America today is, as it has been for a century, individualism vs. collectivism. Does the individual’s life belong to him—or does it belong to the group, the community, society, or the state? With government expanding ever more rapidly—seizing and spending more and more of our money on “entitlement” programs and corporate bailouts, and intruding on our businesses and lives in increasingly onerous ways—the need for clarity on this issue has never been greater. Let us begin by defining the terms at hand.

Individualism is the idea that the individual’s life belongs to him and that he has an inalienable right to live it as he sees fit, to act on his own judgment, to keep and use the product of his effort, and to pursue the values of his choosing. It’s the idea that the individual is sovereign, an end in himself, and the fundamental unit of moral concern. This is the ideal that the American Founders set forth and sought to establish when they drafted the Declaration and the Constitution and created a country in which the individual’s rights to life, liberty, property, and the pursuit of happiness were to be recognized and protected.

Collectivism is the idea that the individual’s life belongs not to him but to the group or society of which he is merely a part, that he has no rights, and that he must sacrifice his values and goals for the group’s “greater good.” According to collectivism, the group or society is the basic unit of moral concern, and the individual is of value only insofar as he serves the group. As one advocate of this idea puts it: “Man has no rights except those which society permits him to enjoy. From the day of his birth until the day of his death society allows him to enjoy certain so-called rights and deprives him of others; not . . . because society desires especially to favor or oppress the individual, but because its own preservation, welfare, and happiness are the prime considerations.”1

Individualism or collectivism—which of these ideas is correct? Which has the facts on its side?




Individualism vs. Collectivism: Our Future, Our Choice - The Objective Standard
again it doesnt matter pay your taxes or go to jail, i have no problem with that, your greed doesnt make me feel sorry for you it makes me hate you
 
Sep 2018
6,679
1,112
cleveland ohio
#12
Dissagree.

Not my god



Individualism vs. Collectivism: Our Future, Our Choice

The fundamental political conflict in America today is, as it has been for a century, individualism vs. collectivism. Does the individual’s life belong to him—or does it belong to the group, the community, society, or the state? With government expanding ever more rapidly—seizing and spending more and more of our money on “entitlement” programs and corporate bailouts, and intruding on our businesses and lives in increasingly onerous ways—the need for clarity on this issue has never been greater. Let us begin by defining the terms at hand.

Individualism is the idea that the individual’s life belongs to him and that he has an inalienable right to live it as he sees fit, to act on his own judgment, to keep and use the product of his effort, and to pursue the values of his choosing. It’s the idea that the individual is sovereign, an end in himself, and the fundamental unit of moral concern. This is the ideal that the American Founders set forth and sought to establish when they drafted the Declaration and the Constitution and created a country in which the individual’s rights to life, liberty, property, and the pursuit of happiness were to be recognized and protected.

Collectivism is the idea that the individual’s life belongs not to him but to the group or society of which he is merely a part, that he has no rights, and that he must sacrifice his values and goals for the group’s “greater good.” According to collectivism, the group or society is the basic unit of moral concern, and the individual is of value only insofar as he serves the group. As one advocate of this idea puts it: “Man has no rights except those which society permits him to enjoy. From the day of his birth until the day of his death society allows him to enjoy certain so-called rights and deprives him of others; not . . . because society desires especially to favor or oppress the individual, but because its own preservation, welfare, and happiness are the prime considerations.”1

Individualism or collectivism—which of these ideas is correct? Which has the facts on its side?




Individualism vs. Collectivism: Our Future, Our Choice - The Objective Standard
excuse me it isnt the ten suggestions its the bloody ten commandments!
 
Dec 2016
5,101
2,620
Canada
#15
This is such a silly, desperate attempt at sn argument. The state steals wealth from the people and if we object to this theft we are dubbed "hypocritical" when we find a way to extract some of it back.

Ridiculous
I'm just thankful that artificial immortal persons (corporations) don't steal wealth from the people!
Amazon Gets $3 Billion in NY Tax Breaks While Underfunded Public Transport Enters ‘Death Spiral’

Non-libertarians might also want to watch this 12-minute lecture by James Henry on how Amazon is typical of how corporate welfare bums play one city or state against each other to grab tax "incentives."

Systematized Tax Evasion: Cheating Competition