High School Students Disqualified From Debate After Quoting Ben Shapiro, Jordan Peterson

Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#31
Sabcat lives in a log cabin on the Prairie and near Colorado. Sabcat showed me a picture of his muscle car, 1969 Hemi Dodge Daytona if not mistaken

No. That was not my car. I postes a picture of a sweet old charger because someone kept dodging my point. Would love an old charger but probably would get an early mustang if i was going to pick up a 60s car.

I drive a bimmer
 
Nov 2005
8,773
3,268
California
#32
They do the speed reading because for evidence to be presented the whole thing has to be read and it is a timed event. It is a common practice. If you recall there were highlighted parts. That was most likely the parts they intend on using.
I get why they do it. The portion I bold-faced above is entirely matching my experience.

However, where the <bleep> do you see anybody doing that type of crap anywhere else in society other than like auction houses which follow a regular routine and all you really need to catch is the next bid amount and whether somebody has satisfied it...

To me, high school debate was about more than just piling in as many arguments as you could. A big part of it was about public speaking and presenting your arguments in a cogent manner.
If all that was needed is to have it read even though you would need the text to follow along, the speech and presentation portions become prefunctory when they shouldn't be. Moreover, as I tried to follow along reading, I found his speed speech distracting.

To put it another way, you have expressed annoyance with the length of posts.
The impact of speed reading is essentially to increase the length / number of the arguments introduced, while reducing the audio comprehension of the speaker.

Finally, he mentioned giving a copy of the statements to others to help with comprehension. While he was acting as the negative team, the very thought of handing an exact copy of my affirmative plan to another team is appalling to me (in my debate experience context).
Similarly for "negative" arguments. I would want to file that paper in my case and use somebody else's research/quotes to adapt to future debates.


With that said, I think the debate structure of different regions can vary widely and there may be a lot more to the way the region involved does their debate that I don't know / appreciate. I just found it odd and annoying.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#33
I get why they do it. The portion I bold-faced above is entirely matching my experience.

However, where the <bleep> do you see anybody doing that type of crap anywhere else in society other than like auction houses which follow a regular routine and all you really need to catch is the next bid amount and whether somebody has satisfied it...

To me, high school debate was about more than just piling in as many arguments as you could. A big part of it was about public speaking and presenting your arguments in a cogent manner.
If all that was needed is to have it read even though you would need the text to follow along, the speech and presentation portions become prefunctory when they shouldn't be. Moreover, as I tried to follow along reading, I found his speed speech distracting.

To put it another way, you have expressed annoyance with the length of posts.
The impact of speed reading is essentially to increase the length / number of the arguments introduced, while reducing the audio comprehension of the speaker.

Finally, he mentioned giving a copy of the statements to others to help with comprehension. While he was acting as the negative team, the very thought of handing an exact copy of my affirmative plan to another team is appalling to me (in my debate experience context).
Similarly for "negative" arguments. I would want to file that paper in my case and use somebody else's research/quotes to adapt to future debates.


With that said, I think the debate structure of different regions can vary widely and there may be a lot more to the way the region involved does their debate that I don't know / appreciate. I just found it odd and annoying.

It is almost exactly like it is currently here.

You are given the topics long in advance. You arrive prepared for both sides. You draw a time/room/side. Depending you have from them to refine your approach.

You hand a packet w/ all the evidence that you may use/introduce to the judges. So you say booklet four, page three (or however you identify the evidence) then blast thru it. Then go back and make the point.

This is done for a few reasons most notably so your not just making stuff up and that entire article is introduced therefore the other team has the opportunity to use it in its entirety against you.
 
Nov 2005
8,773
3,268
California
#34
It is almost exactly like it is currently here.
You are given the topics long in advance. You arrive prepared for both sides. You draw a time/room/side. Depending you have from them to refine your approach.
You hand a packet w/ all the evidence that you may use/introduce to the judges. So you say booklet four, page three (or however you identify the evidence) then blast thru it. Then go back and make the point.

This is done for a few reasons most notably so your not just making stuff up and that entire article is introduced therefore the other team has the opportunity to use it in its entirety against you.
1) From the snippets seen, the entirety of the article was not on that sheet. Somebody "copy/pasted" and then reprinted the statement.
Quite frankly, I would be fascinated to see how that "entire article" aspect plays out because I don't see how people can just carry around entire articles like that. We had prepared a LONG LIST of possible pieces of information and counter-arguments, most of which were never used.
To have to give the entirety of the article for all of that? I just can't see it happening...

2) If I give you a paper that says "Abraham Lincoln said that ____" vs telling you in my speech, how does that give you a better way to prove it false?
 
May 2018
3,948
2,916
USA
#35
No. That was not my car. I postes a picture of a sweet old charger because someone kept dodging my point. Would love an old charger but probably would get an early mustang if i was going to pick up a 60s car.

I drive a bimmer
Some people love paying too much for mediocre cars.