How does the federal minimum wage rate effect all USA wage rates?

Marcus Livius

Former Staff
Sep 2017
2,666
1,345
Hell
come on man, you said that a worker in Mississippi would "suddenly" see triple pay

"suddenly" does not mean 6 years from now

that was the only reason for my post that you replied to last night,
people in this thread (including you) were talking like the wage increase was going to be overnight
It was hyperbolic. Six years to triple a salary is almost instantaneous - if you do not comprehend that, you have no clue to the schedule of wage increases for the people that we want to help. How would a company react with perhaps near insurmountable task of maintaining the same number of staff with the same hours tripling in 6 years? Most people that work for $5.15/hr would be lucky to see a $0.50 raise in six years, perhaps not even enough to keep up times. Why argue over semantics when my point is that a universal minimum wage will not work across the board, tremendously enriching some and having absolutely no impact on others unless the State or County steps in?

The idea of this min wage is noble, but like all things government, it is ill thought out and should bet should left to the municipalities to decide what is a living wage in THEIR area. That should be the focus of a federal law, not some magical number. And what the fuck happens if by 2026, inflation have surpassed this magical number for it to actually do anything for anyone it was intended to help?
 

Marcus Livius

Former Staff
Sep 2017
2,666
1,345
Hell
Moving away to have independence is better than living with family? Few of my elderly friends would choose to live with family. With small apartments, it may be impossible for family to live together. It might be sane to greatly increase low-income housing and senior centers, and the rest of the older American entitlements, but I don't see that happening. We are not being very scientific about our management of human needs. I believe the biggest reason for demanding higher wages is the rising cost of living and that can be controlled by planning low-income housing, food assistance and universal medical care.

About minimum wages, it really sucks to retire on a minimum wage income! We are not paying attention and we are not doing the math, but things would suck even more if those poor suckers weren't working for minimum wage and voting for Trump who stands against government assistance programs.
Living with family is not same as living close to family and friends. Who the hell wants to go live where they don't know anyone and having children and grandchildren is now a burden for them?

Having to move forces the elderly to leave behind their emotional support they receive from their family, friends, and the community they have lived n for the decades of their most productive years.
 
Feb 2014
3,388
1,605
Oregon
Living with family is not same as living close to family and friends. Who the hell wants to go live where they don't know anyone and having children and grandchildren is now a burden for them?

Having to move forces the elderly to leave behind their emotional support they receive from their family, friends, and the community they have lived n for the decades of their most productive years.
I agree with you. I am a great grandmother and have played an important role in raising 3 generations of children. I think this is extremely important for everyone involved and I strongly support the Older Americans Act that gives older Americans entitlements to decent housing, transportation, continuing education and active roles in society. The problem is this is a 1960's Act and few people know anything about the Older American's Act and the entitlements are poorly funded. If Trump had his way they would not be funded.

The point I wanted to make is there are alternatives to raising wages and making our workforce less competitive on the global market. More civilized nations have government assistance programs for people of all ages, and universal medical care, among other things, this means they can have low wages that make them competitive for world markets and still have a decent standard of living. We can think of this government assistance as a subsidy for industry, rather than as subsidizing individuals. We can think of it as how to be civilized and avoid social problems.

I also wanted to make it clear that retiring on a minimum wage income does not meet human needs, and all economies depend on low wage workers. These workers should be able to depend on our society for a decent standard of living because our economy depends on them.
 
Last edited:
Jul 2019
12,636
9,254
Georgia
It was hyperbolic. Six years to triple a salary is almost instantaneous - if you do not comprehend that, you have no clue to the schedule of wage increases for the people that we want to help. How would a company react with perhaps near insurmountable task of maintaining the same number of staff with the same hours tripling in 6 years? Most people that work for $5.15/hr would be lucky to see a $0.50 raise in six years, perhaps not even enough to keep up times. Why argue over semantics when my point is that a universal minimum wage will not work across the board, tremendously enriching some and having absolutely no impact on others unless the State or County steps in?

The idea of this min wage is noble, but like all things government, it is ill thought out and should bet should left to the municipalities to decide what is a living wage in THEIR area. That should be the focus of a federal law, not some magical number. And what the fuck happens if by 2026, inflation have surpassed this magical number for it to actually do anything for anyone it was intended to help?
It's almost nose to nose to the cost of living wage I give my employees every year.

Granted, they start way above minimum wage. Usually as interns. In Georgia.

Therefore, I don't see the problem.
 
Feb 2014
3,388
1,605
Oregon
It was hyperbolic. Six years to triple a salary is almost instantaneous - if you do not comprehend that, you have no clue to the schedule of wage increases for the people that we want to help. How would a company react with perhaps near insurmountable task of maintaining the same number of staff with the same hours tripling in 6 years? Most people that work for $5.15/hr would be lucky to see a $0.50 raise in six years, perhaps not even enough to keep up times. Why argue over semantics when my point is that a universal minimum wage will not work across the board, tremendously enriching some and having absolutely no impact on others unless the State or County steps in?

The idea of this min wage is noble, but like all things government, it is ill thought out and should bet should left to the municipalities to decide what is a living wage in THEIR area. That should be the focus of a federal law, not some magical number. And what the fuck happens if by 2026, inflation have surpassed this magical number for it to actually do anything for anyone it was intended to help?
When it comes to math I am an idiot, but already the cost of living is too high for low-income workers, especially if they have children. I live in a community where the cost of housing has jumped very high putting families on the streets. So waiting 6 years for an increase in pay, does not sound like a good deal to me. But now for the math question. What happens to that increase in minimum age when we figure in the rate of inflation?

And how about all those people retiring with nothing but Social Security will their income keep up with the inflation? When rent jumps $100 to $400 a month, the following inflation rate does not seem realistic, but it is what we have to work with. Isn't adding $100 to a $800 rent, 8% not 1.8% and rent is not the only thing that keeps going up?

The annual inflation rate for the United States is 1.8% for the 12 months ended July 2019 compared to 1.6% previously, as published on August 13, 2019 by the U.S. Labor Department. The next inflation update is scheduled for release on September 12, 2019 at 8:30 a.m.
Current US Inflation Rates: 2009-2019 | US Inflation Calculator


https://www.usinflationcalculator.com › inflation › current-inflation-rates
https://www.usinflationcalculator.com/inflation/current-inflation-rates/
 
Oct 2009
551
106
Cliffside Park, NJ
I didn't miss your point. A few years to triple one's pay is still almost instantaneous in a worker's career. ...
Marcus Livius, HR 528, “Raise the Wage” bill, or a similar bill to increase the federal minimum wage rate is not expected to be passed through both houses of the U.S. Congress and signed by our president until some time within the year 2021. A minimum wage increase is not enacted without some lead time of a good portion of a year's time. HR 528 was drafted to increase the minimum rate in 6 annual incremental steps before attaining a minimum rate of $15 per hour.

So if HR 528 is the bill that would be eventually passed, from the bill's date of passage, which is not expected to be passed sooner than a date in excess of 16 months in the future, that will not achieve its promised purchasing power until a future date no less than 16 + ½ + 72 = 88 + ½ which would be a date no sooner than 7.75 years in our future.

You 're contending almost 8 years to "reach the announced target" is effectively an instantaneous increase? You also contend that increasing the minimum wage rate from $7.25 to $15 per hour is tripling the rate?
 
Nov 2014
3,457
417
Florida
The chances of passing a $15 minimum wage in the GOP-controlled Senate are slim to none. Even so, the bill’s passage in the House is a major step forward for low-income families.
It had been more than 10 years since lawmakers raised the federal minimum wage, the longest period in history that it’s stayed stagnant.

The current $7.25 minimum hourly rate was set in 2009, right in the middle of the Great Recession. Since then, America’s lowest-paid workers have lost about $3000/yr. when you consider the rising cost of living. The law would raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. The law would also tie future changes to changes in median workers’ pay. So if middle-class wages go up — or down — so would the minimum wage.

This bill was sponsored by 200 Democrats which means one thing. The GOP Senate may not even bring it to the floor.
The GOP: The party who LOVES America but hates Americans--particularly the poorest among us. Their fealty is to corporations.
How many states do not have a higher minimum wage? For instance minimum wage in Florida is $8.25. They should make states get rid of the tipping wage which is much lower
 
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Dec 2015
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22,345
Arizona
How many states do not have a higher minimum wage? For instance minimum wage in Florida is $8.25. They should make states get rid of the tipping wage which is much lower
Possibly 29 states have a higher minimum wage. I agree with you about the tipping wage.
 
Oct 2009
551
106
Cliffside Park, NJ
How many states do not have a higher minimum wage? For instance minimum wage in Florida is $8.25. They should make states get rid of the tipping wage which is much lower
PTIF219, your post isn't clear. Who's “they”?
Are you advocating the federal law should not have a lesser minimum-rate applicable to “tipped employees”, or are you opposed to states increasing minimum rates applicable within their state's jurisdiction? What is it you're advocating? Respectfully, Supposn
 
Feb 2014
3,388
1,605
Oregon
Marcus Livius, HR 528, “Raise the Wage” bill, or a similar bill to increase the federal minimum wage rate is not expected to be passed through both houses of the U.S. Congress and signed by our president until some time within the year 2021. A minimum wage increase is not enacted without some lead time of a good portion of a year's time. HR 528 was drafted to increase the minimum rate in 6 annual incremental steps before attaining a minimum rate of $15 per hour.

So if HR 528 is the bill that would be eventually passed, from the bill's date of passage, which is not expected to be passed sooner than a date in excess of 16 months in the future, that will not achieve its promised purchasing power until a future date no less than 16 + ½ + 72 = 88 + ½ which would be a date no sooner than 7.75 years in our future.

You 're contending almost 8 years to "reach the announced target" is effectively an instantaneous increase? You also contend that increasing the minimum wage rate from $7.25 to $15 per hour is tripling the rate?
Another way to go is to make unions strong again. Which would be better, empowering the people with unions, or putting all the power in the Federal government?

Here is the stats for states with strong unions and states that call right to have slaves the right to work.
Union affiliation by U.S. state - Wikipedia

Here is the stats for states minimum wage.
State Minimum Wages | 2019 Minimum Wage by State

top 10 best and worst US states
Top 10 best and worst US states for economy
the number of states in the top best and worst states, with "right to work law" and those that favor unions is about 50/50 so maybe my idea that unions can decrease poverty is wrong, but empowering the people might be better than giving the federal government the power to determine wages?


Interesting stats on states' wealth
Every US state economy ranked from worst to best