In colonial America, abortion was dealt with in a manner according to English common law. Abortion was typically only frowned upon,

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In colonial America, abortion was dealt with in a manner according to English common law. Abortion was typically only frowned upon, or penalized, when it occurred after “quickening,”—when a woman felt fetal movement—because it suggested that the fetus had manifested into its own separate being. Quickening could vary from women to woman, and sometimes as late as four months. Additionally, it was only penalized because it was typically seen as some kind cover-up for improper sexual relations.

States began to draft abortion legislation in the first half of the 19th century and by 1880, every state had an abortion statute. Most of these early abortion statutes were designed to protect women from medical quacks far from the established centers of American medicine—Philadelphia, New York, and Boston, for example. These early statutes (for the most part) punished only the provider of the abortion, not the woman, and either did not apply to physicians, or did not apply if the abortion was necessary to preserve the life of the woman. Therefore, except under these special circumstances, abortion was illegal.

When did abortion become legal in the United States? - DailyHistory.org
 
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In colonial America, abortion was dealt with in a manner according to English common law. Abortion was typically only frowned upon, or penalized, when it occurred after “quickening,”—when a woman felt fetal movement—because it suggested that the fetus had manifested into its own separate being. Quickening could vary from women to woman, and sometimes as late as four months. Additionally, it was only penalized because it was typically seen as some kind cover-up for improper sexual relations.

States began to draft abortion legislation in the first half of the 19th century and by 1880, every state had an abortion statute. Most of these early abortion statutes were designed to protect women from medical quacks far from the established centers of American medicine—Philadelphia, New York, and Boston, for example. These early statutes (for the most part) punished only the provider of the abortion, not the woman, and either did not apply to physicians, or did not apply if the abortion was necessary to preserve the life of the woman. Therefore, except under these special circumstances, abortion was illegal.

When did abortion become legal in the United States? - DailyHistory.org
In colonial America if a woman didn’t sink if you threw her in the water she was a witch so....
 

KnightOfSappho

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There was no such thing as abortion prior to quickening.
Clarification please...

Are you saying that abortions were not attempted before quickening or are you saying that terminating a pregnancy before quickening had no legal status?
 
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Clarification please...

Are you saying that abortions were not attempted before quickening or are you saying that terminating a pregnancy before quickening had no legal status?
English law against abortion can be traced Leges Henrici Primi of 1115, 100 years before the Magna Carta, and abortion was considered homicide. Henry de Bracton:

If one strikes a pregnant woman or gives her poison in order to procure an abortion, if the fetus is already formed or animated (quickened), especially if it is animated (quickened), he commits homicide.​

All abortion was illegal under English common law. English common law defined abortion as destroying a fētus, which was defined as a baby in the womb, which means a fētus was a living human. There are many cases of ingestive abortions in the records of ecclesiastical and the lay courts in England dating to the 15th century. According to the historical documentation, ingestive abortions were felonies punishable by death. By the end of the 16th century, both types of abortion were capital offenses.

William Blackstone defined the law as a “very serious misdemeanor.” Misdemeanors were punishable by life in prison or the confiscation of property. Quickening, according to Blackstone, was the medical confirmation of when a woman was pregnant by feeling the baby move, and prior to quickening, there was no fetus to abort according to their medical science; this was the medical test of the time and was the equivalent to a pregnancy test today. This practice, along with having your blood let and a haircut, changed once medical science discovered how to determine when conception began. Conception under English common law was when life begins. Until quickening, there was no determination that a woman was pregnant with a fetus. And it was against the law to kill or destroy a fetus, but the medical technology of the day determined a woman was pregnant by quickening.

The colonies operated under English common law. After the Revolutionary War, the states continued to use English common law as their laws, including English common law governing crimes such as abortion.

Moreover, abortion laws created by state legislatures dating back to 1821 forbid abortion once quickening was determined, which meant that a woman had confirmation she was pregnant according to the science of the times; quickening was not a technical free pass to abort a living fetus. The laws would have been zero days if they had the science at the time to show that pregnancy occurred at conception.

The “intent to abort” in Maryland in 1652 was a capital crime. In 1710, Virginia made the concealment of a pregnancy and then found with a dead baby a capital crime. In 1719, Delaware law made just the counseling of abortion an accessory to murder and your declaration of no law against abortion at the time of the Constitution. After the state legislatures started defining crimes as early as 1821, Connecticut passed legislative making abortions illegal.

After the American Medical Association declared in 1859 that life began well before quickening, and an abortion at any stage was killing a human life, the state laws were changed to make it illegal to perform any type of abortion at any stage. If this knowledge had been available in the colonies, then abortion at any stage would have been punishable by death.
 
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English law against abortion can be traced Leges Henrici Primi of 1115, 100 years before the Magna Carta, and abortion was considered homicide. Henry de Bracton:

If one strikes a pregnant woman or gives her poison in order to procure an abortion, if the fetus is already formed or animated (quickened), especially if it is animated (quickened), he commits homicide.​

All abortion was illegal under English common law. English common law defined abortion as destroying a fētus, which was defined as a baby in the womb, which means a fētus was a living human. There are many cases of ingestive abortions in the records of ecclesiastical and the lay courts in England dating to the 15th century. According to the historical documentation, ingestive abortions were felonies punishable by death. By the end of the 16th century, both types of abortion were capital offenses.

William Blackstone defined the law as a “very serious misdemeanor.” Misdemeanors were punishable by life in prison or the confiscation of property. Quickening, according to Blackstone, was the medical confirmation of when a woman was pregnant by feeling the baby move, and prior to quickening, there was no fetus to abort according to their medical science; this was the medical test of the time and was the equivalent to a pregnancy test today. This practice, along with having your blood let and a haircut, changed once medical science discovered how to determine when conception began. Conception under English common law was when life begins. Until quickening, there was no determination that a woman was pregnant with a fetus. And it was against the law to kill or destroy a fetus, but the medical technology of the day determined a woman was pregnant by quickening.

The colonies operated under English common law. After the Revolutionary War, the states continued to use English common law as their laws, including English common law governing crimes such as abortion.

Moreover, abortion laws created by state legislatures dating back to 1821 forbid abortion once quickening was determined, which meant that a woman had confirmation she was pregnant according to the science of the times; quickening was not a technical free pass to abort a living fetus. The laws would have been zero days if they had the science at the time to show that pregnancy occurred at conception.

The “intent to abort” in Maryland in 1652 was a capital crime. In 1710, Virginia made the concealment of a pregnancy and then found with a dead baby a capital crime. In 1719, Delaware law made just the counseling of abortion an accessory to murder and your declaration of no law against abortion at the time of the Constitution. After the state legislatures started defining crimes as early as 1821, Connecticut passed legislative making abortions illegal.

After the American Medical Association declared in 1859 that life began well before quickening, and an abortion at any stage was killing a human life, the state laws were changed to make it illegal to perform any type of abortion at any stage. If this knowledge had been available in the colonies, then abortion at any stage would have been punishable by death.
This is 2018, and abortion is legal by American law, and we use modern medical science to make medical decisions, of which is between only a woman and her doctor.
 
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KnightOfSappho

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Jimmy your answer was a bit beyond the scope of the question. From what I gleaned from your answer, abortion essentially had no status before quickening because of the medical capabilities of the time.
 
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Barsoom
Jimmy your answer was a bit beyond the scope of the question. From what I gleaned from your answer, abortion essentially had no status before quickening because of the medical capabilities of the time.
That is the gist.