Is it accurate to refer to protestants as Christians, or should they be referred to as Judeo-Christians?

Nov 2017
2,161
994
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#1
Here's my understanding about Christianity:

The Roman Catholic & Orthodox churches are Christian, tracing their origins all the way back to Jesus Christ as the founder of those churches. This is prior to major events that created protestant churches, such as the Lutheran church around the 1520s, the Anglican church around the 1530s by England's King Henry VIII, and later the Mormon church around the late 1820s.

The protestant churches use what's referred to as the King James Version of the bible; the original King James version of the bible, which came out in 1611, was the same as the traditional Christian bible. In 1885, this changed; the New Testament books remained the same, but some of the Old Testament books were removed, and the reason this was done by the protestants was because these books aren't in the Hebrew scriptures.

I've heard this term Judeo-Christian used around quite a few times, and given that the protestants changed their bible to be more like the Jewish bible, it's sort of like a merger of Judaism and Christianity, hence my question - are protestants actually Judeo-Christians rather than regular Christians?

This is just purely a matter of curiosity, for me; I'm not religious, so it actually makes no difference to me. I just want to see what people have to say about this.
 
Feb 2019
1,765
423
here and there
#5
Here's my understanding about Christianity:

The Roman Catholic & Orthodox churches are Christian, tracing their origins all the way back to Jesus Christ as the founder of those churches. This is prior to major events that created protestant churches, such as the Lutheran church around the 1520s, the Anglican church around the 1530s by England's King Henry VIII, and later the Mormon church around the late 1820s.

The protestant churches use what's referred to as the King James Version of the bible; the original King James version of the bible, which came out in 1611, was the same as the traditional Christian bible. In 1885, this changed; the New Testament books remained the same, but some of the Old Testament books were removed, and the reason this was done by the protestants was because these books aren't in the Hebrew scriptures.

I've heard this term Judeo-Christian used around quite a few times, and given that the protestants changed their bible to be more like the Jewish bible, it's sort of like a merger of Judaism and Christianity, hence my question - are protestants actually Judeo-Christians rather than regular Christians?

This is just purely a matter of curiosity, for me; I'm not religious, so it actually makes no difference to me. I just want to see what people have to say about this.
I don't think anyone cares.

You are talking to a group that is not easily offended, so it's not like a jihadist will come out and kill you or your house will be surrounding by protesters screaming obscenities wearing vagina hats and demanding social justice
 
Nov 2017
2,161
994
.
#6
I don't think anyone cares.

You are talking to a group that is not easily offended, so it's not like a jihadist will come out and kill you or your house will be surrounding by protesters screaming obscenities wearing vagina hats and demanding social justice
Are you sure they won't get offended? If I go up to protestants & say "you're not a Christian, you're actually a Judeo-Christian", they'll just say "good point, I never realized it before"?
 
May 2019
821
172
USA
#7
Judeo-Christian is just a term describing the links between Abrahamic religions and Christianity. Christianity, as in the coming of a Messiah was foretold in the Torah. When the Christian Messiah was perceived to have arrived, his teachings became the Christian religion. This is not that hard to understand.
 
Nov 2012
2,821
1,723
Rhondda
#8
Islam reveres Jesus more than do most Jews, let's face it. The fact that the Bishop of Rome attempted to establish a bullying dictatorship over Constantine's 'Church' is hardly relevant to Christianity in any way, surely?
 
Dec 2015
17,337
16,318
Arizona
#9
Judeo-Christian is a political term. It gained widespread popularity, as pastors, politicians, and pundits seized on the term to mobilize the spiritual forces of America against "godless" communism. It became an ethical/moral expression and basically threw a bone to the Jews--an invitation to the country club.
Eisenhower: "With us of course it is the Judeo-Christian concept but it must be a religion that all men are created equal."
 
Jul 2018
2,287
555
Earth
#10
Here's my understanding about Christianity:

The Roman Catholic & Orthodox churches are Christian, tracing their origins all the way back to Jesus Christ as the founder of those churches. This is prior to major events that created protestant churches, such as the Lutheran church around the 1520s, the Anglican church around the 1530s by England's King Henry VIII, and later the Mormon church around the late 1820s.

The protestant churches use what's referred to as the King James Version of the bible; the original King James version of the bible, which came out in 1611, was the same as the traditional Christian bible. In 1885, this changed; the New Testament books remained the same, but some of the Old Testament books were removed, and the reason this was done by the protestants was because these books aren't in the Hebrew scriptures.

I've heard this term Judeo-Christian used around quite a few times, and given that the protestants changed their bible to be more like the Jewish bible, it's sort of like a merger of Judaism and Christianity, hence my question - are protestants actually Judeo-Christians rather than regular Christians?

This is just purely a matter of curiosity, for me; I'm not religious, so it actually makes no difference to me. I just want to see what people have to say about this.
That is an interesting point of view. No one has ever expressed it on any forums I've read. The people who led the movement to delete the Apocrypha were real scummers.