Is Poverty in Black America More the Product of Racism or Culture?

Jul 2014
14,698
8,949
massachusetts
#41
Either your friend is lying, you are lying, you are talking about 30 years ago or you have never heard of a lawyer. If something even remotely close to that happened to me i would still be counting cash.
That was like ten years ago.
It still happens today, once again your understanding of the situation doesn't reflect reality.
 
Dec 2013
33,811
19,359
Beware of watermelons
#42
That was like ten years ago.
It still happens today, once again your understanding of the situation doesn't reflect reality.
If it happened they should have sued. They would have easily won.

It sounds as if your friend is an alt right racist nazi though. Not really someone who i would be spending time w/

Or, maybe you are just making it up.
 
Nov 2012
10,823
9,016
nirvana
#43
It is mostly culture now. That is not helped with the constant harping about how the "black" citizens cannot compete....which is false. It also relates to some of the so called black leaders, who prefer to talk their community down rather than speaking to them about how they can improve their own lives and compete in our open society. The black community is sorely lacking in real, productive leaders that work to bring them all into the nation's society. They prefer to separate every




subject into skin color, either as a excuse for something or a reason to




























That tough road is not limited to our "black" citizens. Many rural areas do not have the newest or best schools....some have exceptional ones and that is because of a full community interest and involvement.
Racism is partly related. But your posts sure seem to have a direct relation to it.
 
Likes: Lyzza
Dec 2015
16,986
15,912
Arizona
#45
Culture is in constant flux. Racism is not. The black community has come a long LONG way but still has a long way to go.
In 1940, 60 percent of employed black women worked as domestic servants; today the number is down to 2.2 percent, while 60 percent hold white- collar jobs.
More than 40 percent of African Americans now consider themselves members of the middle class. Forty-two percent own their own homes, a figure that rises to 75 percent if we look just at black married couples. Black two-parent families earn only 13 percent less than those who are white. Almost a third of the black population lives in suburbia. Fifty years ago most blacks were trapped in poverty but not in urban areas. They were land laborers and sharecroppers. Manufacturing after WWII brought Blacks to our cities and they stayed. Not only did they stay, but as the decades passed they got educations, promotions, home ownership and more opportunity. Many seized those opportunities but some did not.

Racism continues to plague us. Even the most educated, wealthy, prominent in the Black community are questioned, doubted and distrusted today. Look at how often members of the Black community (doctors, attorneys, sports stars)
are victims of unwarranted verbal attacks, law enforcement, airline employees, and lost job opportunities.
AND black women have twice the struggle.
We the people recently elected a black president and what did we see? How did SOME Americans behave?
That is racism.
 
Jul 2014
14,698
8,949
massachusetts
#46
If it happened they should have sued. They would have easily won.

It sounds as if your friend is an alt right racist nazi though. Not really someone who i would be spending time w/

Or, maybe you are just making it up.
Who should have sued?
The doctor who only knew that the apartment had already been rented?

The Rental Agent who depended on small landlords for listings?

Who would they have sued, a landlord with 4 or less units for rent is exempt from the provisions of the Fair Housing Act.

Or maybe they could have sued the Doctor for dressing in a manner that the landlord found repellent......
 
Nov 2012
40,741
11,752
Lebanon, TN
#47
Product of welfare.. One of the best things of my Childhood was I had 2 parents Mother Got up in the morning went to work in Retail.. My Father worked Nights as a Firefighter on an Air Force Base, My Grandfather owned 3 Grocery Stores, all got up and went to work every day.

Our family also owned a small Family farm and I was required to work on the farm... I learned Work Ethic and the value of a pay check.

Now Generational welfare is not limited to the African American Community, this is a problem in the family trees of everyone that is on welfare for a prolonged period..

This is why I support more of a Workfare system.
 
Feb 2007
3,387
1,744
New York
#48
If it happened they should have sued. They would have easily won.

It sounds as if your friend is an alt right racist nazi though. Not really someone who i would be spending time w/

Or, maybe you are just making it up.
I will jump in with another one...

A handful of years ago a (then) friend of mine shared with me that he was working as a waiter in a diner when a black woman walked in and handed her resume to the manger. He graciously accepted it and told her he would give it to the owner and then threw it in the garbage after she left. The manager told my friend (who is white) that they don't hire black people.

Another situation that had happened quite a number of years before that happened when I was pregnant with my younger daughter. I walked into a radiology place for an ultrasound, and the secretary handed me the paperwork for welfare mothers. I politely handed it back and informed her that I had insurance but I watched her as she gave out paperwork to women that came after me. She did it by color.
 
Likes: Clara007
Feb 2007
3,387
1,744
New York
#49
Apologies, I'm rushed tonight, so sorry for the typos and absence of links. I'll try to clean this up later.

First, I think the root cause of poverty of in black America, i.e. it's original cause, is racism. First in the form of slavery and the Jim Crow and everything like it. I think that is an open and shut case. Blacks simply weren't allowed to success in early and not-so-early America. Hopefully no one disagrees with this (if so, it's back to junior high history class for you).

Where it gets interesting in 2018, i.e. today. Is racism perpetuating the poverty that it (racism) created? That's where I start to wonder. An economic achievement gap continues to exist between white and black America; again, no one could argue otherwise. Racism also clearly exists in America; all but the lunatic fringe understand this. Where the the left may (repeat, may) go wrong is to presume the latter is the exclusive cause of the former; i.e. that is all about -- and only ever about -- racism. I wonder if it is.

We know of circumstances other than racism that cause poverty. For example, we know one can greatly increase their chances of winding up poor by 1) failing to finish high school; 2) having a child at a young age; 3) having that child out of wedlock. It doesn't matter if you're black or white, these behaviors dramatically limit economic opportunities. Studies from groups at opposite ends of the political spectrum such as the Brookings Institute and the Heritage Foundation tell us the same thing: avoid these three problems and you dramatically reduce your chances of winding up poor; the data shows the assertion holds true regardless of race. It is also beyond question that these three conditions are higher among blacks in our country than they are for any other demographic. Knowing what these studies tell us and that these conditions are so regrettably high in black America, is it any surprise that an economic gap does exist?

This all leads to the uncomfortable possibility the the I've never seen the political left acknowledge: in 2018 it's individual behavior, at least in part, that is fueling the cycle of poverty in black America. The "trouble" with this reality is that avoiding these conditions doesn't require a government subsidy or a belief that the "other party" is incurably racist. It doesn't require a thesis on robber-baron-inspired racism in early 20th century production era. It doesn't require a chattering class injecting racism into every headline of the day. It takes a recognition that as individuals the choices we make have consequences, and if we wish to avoid poverty there are some choices we should and should not make. More than anything else, this realization opens up the possibility that black America is empowered to improve the condition of black America by healing itself.
It may be 2018, but remember that there are MANY people (my parents generation) living that grew up in Jim Crow and/or were taught the attitudes that come along with Jim Crow; not all of those people lived in the South. That 'invalidation of humanness' Is a generational wound that is still affecting our society today. Many children of color are growing up in environments where they are getting the very clear message that there are no opportunities and their lives will be the same as what they see around them. This is also true of many white children as well (think Appalachia, for example) and you see the same behaviors such as giving up on school, having children young etc. Racism does breed poverty to some extent but poverty breeds poverty more readily.

Ultimately, the majority of Black Americans DO NOT live in poverty. The size of the middle class is about the same, percentage-wise, as the rest of America. There is definitely a gap between what a middle class white family is making and a middle class black family, but there are many reasons for that (racism can be one). It is a known issue that having a black ethnic sounding name lessens the likelihood of getting callbacks for job interviews, for example.

Now who are you making responsible for helping these young Americans make better choices? The parents who have already not made good choices? The schools? The young teens (who, by nature, don't generally make good choices)?
 
Dec 2015
16,986
15,912
Arizona
#50
Product of welfare.. One of the best things of my Childhood was I had 2 parents Mother Got up in the morning went to work in Retail.. My Father worked Nights as a Firefighter on an Air Force Base, My Grandfather owned 3 Grocery Stores, all got up and went to work every day.

Our family also owned a small Family farm and I was required to work on the farm... I learned Work Ethic and the value of a pay check.

Now Generational welfare is not limited to the African American Community, this is a problem in the family trees of everyone that is on welfare for a prolonged period..

This is why I support more of a Workfare system.

HERE we go with the work ethic and those lazy-good-for-nothings. Here are a few statistics: Medicaid (15.3 percent) and SNAP (13.4 percent). Just 4.2 percent of the population received housing assistance in a given month in 2012, just 3 % received SSI.
Those are the categories for "welfare". Medicaid recipients are children, pregnant women, the disabled and the elderly.
44% of SNAP recipients are children in single-parent households. Housing recipients are elderly and households with (again) children and single parents.
Now what were you saying about lazy? Work ethic?
 
Likes: skews13