List of global coups and protests occurring in 2019 - Global unrest?

Nov 2019
431
40
Upstate NY
Meme wars... I can play this game :yes:

I've got to shovel off the porch Ill be back in a few to respond
 
Feb 2006
14,537
3,076
California
As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion ..."
from the Treaty of Tripoli, signed by George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison.

"I have examined all the known superstitions of the world, and I do not find in our particular superstition of Christianity one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology. Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned. What has been the effect of this coercion? To make one half the world fools and the other half hypocrites; to support roguery and error all over the earth."
 
Nov 2019
431
40
Upstate NY
Thomas Jefferson was one of the "bad" or "morally bankrupt" founding fathers - and for some reason liberals just gush or go completely nuts over him. He was an early fan of "lite" liberal thought and ideology, I think it's fair to say he polluted the overwhelmingly conservative atmosphere of the day with a nasty liberal slant, albeit very slight, but still something that should be noted. The man did NOT sign nor was involved with, the Constitution, thank God, and his legacy is mixed, as his second term was beset with difficulties at home, including the trial of former vice president Aaron Burr. American foreign trade was diminished when Jefferson implemented the Embargo Act in the early 1800s. In 1803, Jefferson began a controversial process of Indian tribe removal. I do NOT consider Thomas Jefferson a good person or a good judge of character, nor did he accurately represent the conservative faith based ideology that was so commonplace in that time.

As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion ..."
from the Treaty of Tripoli, signed by George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison.

"I have examined all the known superstitions of the world, and I do not find in our particular superstition of Christianity one redeeming feature. They are all alike founded on fables and mythology. Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned. What has been the effect of this coercion? To make one half the world fools and the other half hypocrites; to support roguery and error all over the earth."
Need I remind you, of the Christian religion of our founding fathers. Nobody cares about your anti christian drivel, you and your armies of leftists will never be able to change history. You can lie about it and you can even believe the lies. You can have your revisionists come along and carefully sew up everything nice and neat, and prim and proper, to accent your deception. But that still makes you wrong. Christianity offers the only freedom from death. The only way is Jesus. Anything, or anyone else, leads straight to hell. Where the fires burn around the clock.



You know what other president has a strong faith in God, like George Washington did?

Donald Trump, you may know who I am referring to? He saved the nation from socialism in 2016, but the liberal socialists didnt give up, and soon enough they will be knocking on Trumps front door, with murder in their hearts, and mayhem in their minds. You might reflect on a quote from Trump, before you write him off completely you should wonder if you got everything completely ass backwards. And perhaps you deserve your fate since you let someone else decide what you should think and who you should be.

 
Feb 2006
14,537
3,076
California
Washington intended religious freedom in the United States to apply to all religions. Shortly after his inauguration as president, religious communities began writing to Washington. He told these groups that the only being to whom Americans owed an explanation of their religious beliefs was God.


The sale of a 230-year-old letter in which America’s first president speaks of “Providence” guiding the fledgling republic’s affairs has rekindled interest in how George Washington saw religion, a subject long debated among scholars, supporters and skeptics.

The letter, which came on the market Monday (Feb. 11), was sold at the asking price of $140,000 to an unnamed private collector by the Raab Collection, an antiquities dealer in Ardmore, Pa., near Philadelphia.

Written Sept. 7, 1788, to Richard Peters, at the time speaker of the Pennsylvania House, the letter captures Washington railing against the calling of a second Constitutional Convention by some states.

Washington wrote, “It would seem from the public Gazettes that the Minority in your State are preparing for another attack of the – now – adopted Government; how formidable it may be; I know not. But that Providence which has hitherto smiled on the honest endeavors of the well meaning part of the People of this Country will not, I trust, withdraw its support from them at this crisis.”

Only a week earlier, according to Raab Collection principal Nathan Raab, Washington had told his former aide Alexander Hamilton that he would accept a call to the presidency.

“Washington, who was the general in chief of the Continental Army during the war and president of the Constitutional Convention, makes a remarkable statement in this powerful letter,” said Raab. “His victory in battle and his stewardship over the convention that led to our Constitution came with the guiding influence of a higher power.”

Washington’s faith life has been studied intensely over the two-plus centuries since his death in 1799. Both deists and evangelical Christians have sought to claim Washington as one of their own.

According to historian Spencer W. McBride, author of the 2017 book “Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America,” Washington was a “very complex figure and very private when it came to religion. We know he would leave church early. He knew attending it was important for civic order, but he did not necessarily believe any one church’s teaching or sacraments were essential or right.”

McBride said Washington “believed religion was important for maintaining the civic order. Exactly what his personal religious beliefs were remains a matter of debate. He had some skepticism about the Christian denominations of his time , but it did not keep him from going to church.”

Indeed, earlier in his life, Washington was a vestryman, or member of the church council, at Pohick Church in Virginia, and as president, Washington would attend services in New York City led by William White, an Episcopal bishop. But, as White later wrote, while first lady Martha Washington would regularly partake of Communion, Washington did not.

But that didn’t make Washington a deist, or an evangelical. In her 2008 book, “In the Hands of a Good Providence,” Mary Thompson, a research historian at Mount Vernon’s Fred W. Smith National Library, claims the first president was “a devout Anglican, of a Latitudinarian bent,” a term covering the kind of uncertainty McBride ascribed to Washington.

The Washington letter is the second item relating a major figure to religion sold in recent months. In December, Christie’s auction house in New York City sold a letter written by Albert Einstein, detailing the physicist’s issues with the concept of God, for $2.9 million.
 
Nov 2019
431
40
Upstate NY
Former President Barack Obama recently made comments that have been interpreted as a warning that Democrats must not veer too far to the left — for instance, by supporting presidential candidates like Senators Bernie Sander or Elizabeth Warren in 2020.

Specifically, Obama said that his party must recognize that “the average American doesn’t think we have to completely tear down the system and remake it.”

Considering that he headlined a recent Democratic National Committee (DNC) fundraiser on Nov. 21 in Silicon Valley, where ticket prices ranged from $10,000 to $355,000, one has to wonder just how many “average Americans” the former President crosses paths with.

In trying to tip the party towards moderation, Obama said Democrats’ “ultimate goal is to defeat a president and a party that has…taken a sharp turn away from a lot of the core traditions and values and institutional commitments that built this country.”

The problem with that analysis is that it fails to appreciate how that established order — the one that former President Obama is so nostalgic for — made Donald Trump possible. Under Obama’s leadership — and both Bushes’, and Clinton’s, and Reagan’s — the elites became disconnected from the circumstances of the vast majority of a country that was, and still is, in decline.

Obama also fails to account for the convergence of several troubling socio-economic and ecological trend lines that have grown even more problematic since he left the White House.

President Obama’s decision to bail out Wall Street at the expense of the poor- and working-class had generational consequences. The destruction of trillions of dollars in family wealth accumulated over decades coincided with an ever-accelerating concentration of wealth that has only worsened under Trump.