Major Measles Outbreak in New York State

Nov 2018
3,242
1,512
Inner Space
#1
Why New York’s Measles Outbreak Is the Worst in Decades

New York State is in the middle of its worst measles epidemic in decades. Since September, the Empire State has recorded 167 cases of the measles, a highly infectious disease for which there is a widely available vaccine. That makes this the worst year for measles in the state since the 1990s, according to NBC News.

The reason for the current measles outbreak? Health officials believe the cause is a fairly straightforward combination of anti-vaccine propaganda (also known as anti-vax) combined with a lack of enforcement of school requirements that parents must vaccinate their children for contagious, spreadable diseases. Experts also suggest this outbreak, which threatens to become a major epidemic if not contained, may be due to a growing trend among some families to skip out on standard medical care, especially for children. When parents sidestep major vaccinations for their children, it can lower the herd immunity among kids and their peers. Herd immunity—that is, when enough people are vaccinated in a larger group—can prevent the wider spread of a contagious illness, even if some individuals do contract the disease.

Another cause is our widely connected world. Measles was previously all but eradicated in the United States, though international travelers have brought the disease back from other countries where it still thrives in certain communities. In terms of identifying a possible case of measles, symptoms often mimic those of the common cold: fever, muscle pain, runny nose, and sore throat, along with a telltale blotchy red skin rash.

Back in August 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was reportedly monitoring measles outbreaks in at least 21 states, caused by small groups of unvaccinated people.

Measles cases also reached a record high across Europe at the end of 2018.
 
Dec 2015
15,125
14,008
Arizona
#2
Why New York’s Measles Outbreak Is the Worst in Decades

New York State is in the middle of its worst measles epidemic in decades. Since September, the Empire State has recorded 167 cases of the measles, a highly infectious disease for which there is a widely available vaccine. That makes this the worst year for measles in the state since the 1990s, according to NBC News.

The reason for the current measles outbreak? Health officials believe the cause is a fairly straightforward combination of anti-vaccine propaganda (also known as anti-vax) combined with a lack of enforcement of school requirements that parents must vaccinate their children for contagious, spreadable diseases. Experts also suggest this outbreak, which threatens to become a major epidemic if not contained, may be due to a growing trend among some families to skip out on standard medical care, especially for children. When parents sidestep major vaccinations for their children, it can lower the herd immunity among kids and their peers. Herd immunity—that is, when enough people are vaccinated in a larger group—can prevent the wider spread of a contagious illness, even if some individuals do contract the disease.

Another cause is our widely connected world. Measles was previously all but eradicated in the United States, though international travelers have brought the disease back from other countries where it still thrives in certain communities. In terms of identifying a possible case of measles, symptoms often mimic those of the common cold: fever, muscle pain, runny nose, and sore throat, along with a telltale blotchy red skin rash.

Back in August 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was reportedly monitoring measles outbreaks in at least 21 states, caused by small groups of unvaccinated people.

Measles cases also reached a record high across Europe at the end of 2018.

I simply DO NOT understand parents who won't vaccinate their children. It's not like this is some new "trial" vaccine. MMRs have been around forever which is WHY measle, mumps and rubella have been eradicated. The schools I worked at were diligent about the paperwork for school enrollment. The inoculation shots form MUST BE signed by a physician. Are the parents scooting around that by signing the form and making up dates? There is a series of THREE vaccinations and all must be accounted for. Some districts require tetanus. What the heck is wrong with people?
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
66,188
26,549
Colorado
#3
In my childhood, moms deliberately exposed their young children to measles; better to have it when young was the thinking.
 
Likes: Sabcat
Dec 2015
15,125
14,008
Arizona
#4
In my childhood, moms deliberately exposed their young children to measles; better to have it when young was the thinking.
I remember hearing that. I remember when my boys had chicken pox. No. 1 son came home with it from pre-school. Two weeks later No. 2 son got it. AN ENTIRE MONTH of chicken pox. I about lost my mind. LOL
 
Sep 2015
13,785
5,003
Brown Township, Ohio
#7
I was 4 when I got chicken pox and 9 when I got measles. Chicken pox itched but I don't remember measles itching. I had a dearth of home made remedies to go through.
 
Apr 2015
1,778
2,052
Stockport. UK
#8
In my childhood, moms deliberately exposed their young children to measles; better to have it when young was the thinking.
It was the same way of thinking with Smallpox before vaccines were available and that was a disease that killed around 3 in 10 and left some survivors with serious scarring.
Measles is far less dangerous, but it still caused around 400 to 500 deaths a year in the USA before a vaccine became available in the 1960’s
 
Likes: Clara007

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
66,188
26,549
Colorado
#9
It is still a common misconception that measles is relatively trivial. It can cause fatalities including encephalitis and is a very serious threat to those who do not have normal immune defenses.
Undoubtedly, yet, I don't remember a single case of this in my childhood. FWIW.
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
66,188
26,549
Colorado
#10
It was the same way of thinking with Smallpox before vaccines were available and that was a disease that killed around 3 in 10 and left some survivors with serious scarring.
Measles is far less dangerous, but it still caused around 400 to 500 deaths a year in the USA before a vaccine became available in the 1960’s
Are you familiar with the genesis of polio epidemics, particularly those in the 40s and 50s?