Major Measles Outbreak in New York State

Apr 2013
37,518
25,575
La La Land North
#11
The loss of herd immunity is starting to be felt. And according to Wikipedia, the death rate is 3 per 1000 cases. I didn't check if some survivors had ongoing issues.
 
Nov 2018
3,910
1,933
Inner Space
#13
It was the same way of thinking with Smallpox before vaccines were available and that was a disease that killed around 3 in 10 and left some survivors with serious scarring.
Measles is far less dangerous, but it still caused around 400 to 500 deaths a year in the USA before a vaccine became available in the 1960’s
I have never heard that about smallpox. Usually guarantee and avoidance was the preferred public health action. Of cowpox is a different issue and a desirable event.
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
67,328
27,219
Colorado
#15
Do you want to say something about that problem or are you looking for some information?
I was opening a conversation. :)

Polio was thought to be a common disease and didn't become a real problem until improved sanitation delayed people's first encounter with the virus.

I'm not going anti-vax here. to be clear, rather addressing a point Carlin raised, that he and his friends never were sick because as children they swam in the liquid shit of the unregulated Hudson River. Their immune systems got plenty of exercise.

It's unescapable that technology is devolving the human genome. I'm not necessarily saying that's bad.....
 
Nov 2018
3,910
1,933
Inner Space
#16
I was opening a conversation. :)

Polio was thought to be a common disease and didn't become a real problem until improved sanitation delayed people's first encounter with the virus.

I'm not going anti-vax here. to be clear, rather addressing a point Carlin raised, that he and his friends never were sick because as children they swam in the liquid shit of the unregulated Hudson River. Their immune systems got plenty of exercise.

It's unescapable that technology is devolving the human genome. I'm not necessarily saying that's bad.....
The myth, true or not, is that with the rural to urban move of Americans in the first 1/2 of the Twentieth Century, there was better sanitation, fewer outhouses less contact with the soil and potential to contract the virus. It is also possible that lower density population centers had a effect to prevent transmission. I have always had some difficult with that theory because in the 19th century there were many epidemics of smallpox. In 1918 there was the "Spanish Flu" that killed perhaps 1 million Americans. Epidemics of polio still occur in 3rd world rural countries. I don't know if there is a wild reservoir or potential for endemic condition. I think some of earlier polio infections were ignored or resulted quickly in deaths due to respiratory failure. There was no diagnostic method to diagnose the disease and it presented as a flu like syndrome with very common signs and symptoms.

I am not certain about "devolving". If you mean that the "weaker" of the species are not dying and causing gene pool changes, I would have to think about that. In one argument, maintaining weak or strong traits means greater diversity in the population. What was considered "weak" could become an important survival benefit.
 

imaginethat

Forum Staff
Oct 2010
67,328
27,219
Colorado
#17
The myth, true or not, is that with the rural to urban move of Americans in the first 1/2 of the Twentieth Century, there was better sanitation, fewer outhouses less contact with the soil and potential to contract the virus. It is also possible that lower density population centers had a effect to prevent transmission. I have always had some difficult with that theory because in the 19th century there were many epidemics of smallpox. In 1918 there was the "Spanish Flu" that killed perhaps 1 million Americans. Epidemics of polio still occur in 3rd world rural countries. I don't know if there is a wild reservoir or potential for endemic condition. I think some of earlier polio infections were ignored or resulted quickly in deaths due to respiratory failure. There was no diagnostic method to diagnose the disease and it presented as a flu like syndrome with very common signs and symptoms.

I am not certain about "devolving". If you mean that the "weaker" of the species are not dying and causing gene pool changes, I would have to think about that. In one argument, maintaining weak or strong traits means greater diversity in the population. What was considered "weak" could become an important survival benefit.
It's a given Biff, that some genetic traits that once resulted in death don't any longer, and thus these genetics remain in the gene pool.
 
Nov 2018
3,910
1,933
Inner Space
#19
The loss of herd immunity is starting to be felt. And according to Wikipedia, the death rate is 3 per 1000 cases. I didn't check if some survivors had ongoing issues.
Associated with measles infection is a peculiar persistent immunosuppression that can increase the later mortality of the patient for up to two years from other disease that require brisk and strong immune responses. The measles causes lymphocyte suppression that last many months.
 
Nov 2018
3,910
1,933
Inner Space
#20
It's a given Biff, that some genetic traits that once resulted in death don't any longer, and thus these genetics remain in the gene pool.
That may be good or bad, but is probably for the better. Diversity is important to species survival. It might be that sensitivity to measles or polio is associated with RESISTANCE to another disease.